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Hey all,

I was just wondering what one would need to do in order to domesticate a wild fish. I was thinking about (in the future) buying an appropriate sized tank and catching a river fish....I know there are a LOT of factors involved here, just wanting to gather some info!
 

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well that i dont no you should test there water or something. see if theres salt in the water and try to make it just like there place same plants and sand . every thing you could do do it. mite be able to take plants from the lake or pond were you get the fish. :wink:
 

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Now thats just TORTURE in my book!!!! You take a wild fish out of there natural habitat, which is usually a huge lake with unlimited swimming room and putting them in, to them, a little tank!!!!!!!! Poor fishy's... :shock:
 

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flattrack23 said:
Now thats just TORTURE in my book!!!! You take a wild fish out of there natural habitat, which is usually a huge lake with unlimited swimming room and putting them in, to them, a little tank!!!!!!!! Poor fishy's... :shock:
Or I can catch them, skin them, and eat them...which is what people do when they catch fish. I'm not talking about sticking a 10 pound catfish in a 12 gallon tank. :roll:
 

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having wild fish is a big thing 4 some, they are more money, more people want them, or some just fancy trying "natives". if a wild fish is there next to a non wild fish in a LFS it would be the wild that sold more, malawi keepers have a big thing 4 getting nice fish F0/wild, a fish in a tank is a fish in a tank whether wild, tank bred or fryed.

others will and have got other views but these are mine :wink:
 

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bolty said:
if a wild fish is there next to a non wild fish in a LFS it would be the wild that sold more.
or that was the case in the LFS i worked in (west dorset aqu)
 

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I worked in a state park in Virginia. We had Fish displays in 125 gallon tanks with local fish. We actually took water directly out of the river and put it in the tank with the fish. We used an emperor filter. As far as the fish went, I think they enjoyed the tank. They never had to hunt for food. I would feed them everyday and they would come to the top of the tank for the food like any domestic fish.
 

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wat if.... I keep the fish in my tank until one day I am too poor to afford food. Can I eat it? Or will the fake flake food/pellets make it nasty tasting? Imagine yourself taking/eating vitamins and bread everyday, how will that affect you?
 

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You shouldnt have to do anything different with a wild fish than one you bought from a fish store. You might have a hard time getting the wild fish to eat prepared foods, some will only eat live. If you do get it and have trouble getting it on prepared ask me more about it.
 

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jd254 said:
wat if.... I keep the fish in my tank until one day I am too poor to afford food. Can I eat it? Or will the fake flake food/pellets make it nasty tasting? Imagine yourself taking/eating vitamins and bread everyday, how will that affect you?
Many restaurants raise their fish and have people eat them. I wouldn't want to do it to my own fish I raised, since I would have gone attached to them already.
 

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One time I had one of my 300g tanks set up with natives. Large mouth bass, smallmouth bass, redeared sunfish, blue gills, black crappie, pike, channel cat, looked cool. Had a large peice of bog wood with a hook and bobber caught in it. Even had an empty beer bottle stuck in the sand. (I emptied it first). No heater, though. Most natives cannot handle the same high temps that tropicals do. I used a chiller to keep my water in the high 50s to low 60s. Filtered very heavy with power heads to create a current. I guess the fish liked it, didn't lose any. All were released after about 2 years into a private pond.
 

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I have kept all kinds of wild critters that I've caught here in southwest MO. I highly recommend minows, darters, and madtom catfish for smaller tanks. For a large tank, you could try sunfish or rock bass. I have had sunfish and bass become so tame that they would eat from my hand. They are particularly fond of eathworms, insects, and fishmeat. Be sure to check with the local laws on certain species. I released my two 7" smallmouth bass when I found out that here it is illegal to remove one less than 15" from the lake.
 

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Nick said:
Now thats just TORTURE in my book!!!! You take a wild fish out of there natural habitat, which is usually a huge lake with unlimited swimming room and putting them in, to them, a little tank!!!!!!!! Poor fishy's... :shock:
It maybe torture to you but you might be saving a life. Here in Jersey if you are trying to catch bass and you are catching sunnies all day long ,someone will crack.
The small ones are good for catching huge bass. Sometimes (probably most of the time), they get stepped on, stabbed, and really 'tortured'. That being the case, they are better off in someones take to be looked at.
Just to clear the record. If and when I go fishing, Im catch and release...
 

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I'm with Gump this time... the requirements shouldn't be any different than any other aquarium fish, however... it's the "change" that will cause shock and in some cases, death. I would suggest checking water params at the lake the fish is coming from, and trying to mimic those, in particular pH and KH.. and temp. It's also a good idea to fluctuate temps as in their natural habitat. If it's warm year round, keep it warm all the time... if it cools off for a few months, turn the heater down during those months.. etc.

Also, remember that the wild caught are usually more sought after due to their brighter colors and natural habits, but once a fish has been kept in captivity for a long time, that is likely to change. The fish no longer have to provide for themselves, and they also have a change in diet. A large reason for their brighter colors is because of diet.

As Gump said, also, you may find it a challenge to get this fish to eat. Some species of fish are also known to be very skittish and shy, and will "freak out" if put into a "clear box of water".

One thing I didn't see mentioned is that in doing something like this, you'll want to watch water params in the tank for the first couple of months, and may need to do extra maintenance. This fish, if caught with a hook, will have an injury that will need time to heal without infection setting in. Fish have wonderful healing abilities, but the water params need to be kept in really good shape for that to happen. In this kind of situation, I would suggest NOT medicating it for any injuries. Wild fish are going to be more sensitive to meds. Clean water and good, healthy food are all they should need to heal.

So, tell us, what kind of fish are you talking about? What is native in your area?
 

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Native species are also of the cold water variety. That means in most cases, no heater. It also means that you may need to use a chiller to get the water cool enough. I went through the "native phase" a few years back. I set up one of my 300g tanks complete with and empty Bud(buuuurrrrp) bottle, broken fishing line, empty JW Dant bottle buried in the sand. Looked cool. I had a couple of largemouth, redear sunfish, crappie, smallmouth, and channel cat. I used a chiller. If the water got to warm I had to ward off fungus and other maladies. You gotta keep them cool.
 
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