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Discussion Starter #1
Hy everyone!

Could you guys help me identify what kind of algae am I facing here? I looked up the type of algaes but i wasn't able to identify it. I have two bets, but I won't say it yet because I don't want to lead you in the wrong direction with it.
It grows on my Cryptocoryne and on my Elodea, but also on the thermometer and on the glass off the tank. :( It can not be removed from the leafs or at least it is very hard to remove it.

Thank you in advance!
 

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Hello Norb...

It appears to me to be a type of Hair algae. Most livebearing fish will remove it. If you're a fan of standard Goldfish, they'll make short work of it too. Some algae is a good thing. It's a good natural water filter. if it becomes a problem, you can reduce the amount you feed and avoid fish foods that have phosphate. You can up your water changes too. This will remove some of the dissolved nutrients that algae like to feed on.

M
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hello!

My tank is a bit small for goldfish :D, it has around 40 liter water in it, it's actual volume is 52 L. To be honest I don't know if the fish food that I feed to my fis contains phosphates or not, I will look it up. I do 2x 30-40% water changes/week, I believe it should be enough.
 

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Hello again...

One larger water change a week is all your tank really needs. It takes up to a week for toxins from the dissolving fish waste to begin to build up in the water. By removing and replacing half the water once a week, you'll be able to remove toxins well before there's time for them to build up to the point your fish will be at risk. But, it's important that you don't feed your fish too much. More food, means more waste material. By keeping to one large water change a week, you improve the water quality and save yourself the time of getting out the gear to change the water a second time.

M
 

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I agree that it is some type of Hair Algae. That type of algae is common in planted tanks when the ratio of light, fertilizer, and CO2 are off a bit. But you don't have much of it, and small amounts of algae in a tank are pretty normal. Two water changes a week are excellent, and if keeping particularly fragile fish (e.g. Discus) that is often recommended. I would say weekly is good basic maintenance for standard fish. Really the more water changes the better, because fish are creating waste not just from their feces and urine but also constantly through respiration with their gills, and the less that is allowed to build the healthier for your fish. You can go up to daily water changes and that would only improve the health and condition of your fish. There's really no such thing as too many water changes, as long as you don't change so much of the water with water of a different temperature or paramater at once that it shocks the animals. In my experience, Amano Shrimp are very good at removing hair algae from plant leaves, so if you don't have any fish that would eat the shrimp you might give some Amanos a try. 1-2 Amano Shrimp per 10 gallons should do the job.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hello again...

One larger water change a week is all your tank really needs. It takes up to a week for toxins from the dissolving fish waste to begin to build up in the water. By removing and replacing half the water once a week, you'll be able to remove toxins well before there's time for them to build up to the point your fish will be at risk. But, it's important that you don't feed your fish too much. More food, means more waste material. By keeping to one large water change a week, you improve the water quality and save yourself the time of getting out the gear to change the water a second time.

M
Alright, thank you :) !
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I agree that it is some type of Hair Algae. That type of algae is common in planted tanks when the ratio of light, fertilizer, and CO2 are off a bit. But you don't have much of it, and small amounts of algae in a tank are pretty normal. Two water changes a week are excellent, and if keeping particularly fragile fish (e.g. Discus) that is often recommended. I would say weekly is good basic maintenance for standard fish. Really the more water changes the better, because fish are creating waste not just from their feces and urine but also constantly through respiration with their gills, and the less that is allowed to build the healthier for your fish. You can go up to daily water changes and that would only improve the health and condition of your fish. There's really no such thing as too many water changes, as long as you don't change so much of the water with water of a different temperature or paramater at once that it shocks the animals. In my experience, Amano Shrimp are very good at removing hair algae from plant leaves, so if you don't have any fish that would eat the shrimp you might give some Amanos a try. 1-2 Amano Shrimp per 10 gallons should do the job.
Thank you!

I actually got myself 4 red cherry shrimps 3-4 weeks ago. I also had problems with having diatoms, and they did a pretty good job on that, it is almost gone, but they doesn't seem to like this hair algae. Do you think that Amano Shrimps would like it, or they eat the same things?
 

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Amano Shrimp are definitely more partial to hair algae than other algae eaters. Diatoms are soft and tend to be every algae eater's favorite, but shrimp and fish that would happily snack on diatoms often ignore hair algae. Amano Shrimp eat most types of algae, including hair algae and black beard algae that most other algae eaters won't, as well as diatoms and the more typical green algae.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Amano Shrimp are definitely more partial to hair algae than other algae eaters. Diatoms are soft and tend to be every algae eater's favorite, but shrimp and fish that would happily snack on diatoms often ignore hair algae. Amano Shrimp eat most types of algae, including hair algae and black beard algae that most other algae eaters won't, as well as diatoms and the more typical green algae.
Nice. I will try to get 1 or 2 then :).
 
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