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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm just wondering...........where do you get your water from for water changes? Does it come right out of the tap, into a container and into the tank OR do you fill up a container/containers, store them and use when doing a water change?

I saved and cleaned out some 1 gallon plastic milk containers. I let hot water sit in each one over night and really rinsed each out. Then, I would fill with tap water and sit near the aquarium. Since our tank is only a 5 gallon one, I only keep 3 gallons b/c I never do more than a 50% water change which would be 2 1/2 gallons. I keep them at room temperature, so they are only a few degrees cooler than the water in the tank.

But, I'm starting to wonder if that "bottled" water is fresh enough for doing a water change. "Right out of the tap" would definitely be fresh water and, using an aquarium thermometer, I could make sure the tap water is very close to the temperature of the tank water.

So, which do you do??
 

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Neither, hose it in straight from the tap.
 

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For 2 of the tanks dechlorinated tap water stands overnight in a container with a heater to bring it up to temp. The third uses a tap-RO 50/50 mix which is also brought upto temp overnight.

One issue for us of using water straight out of the tap is that it is 'artificially buffered' and the pH adjusts itself by anywhere between 0.5 and 1.0 when allowed to stand overnight. This could result in a fairly large swing in the tank for biggish water changes. With the system employed we see a pH swing of less than 0.01 in the tank using the RO mix and less than 0.10 in the other two.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I KNOW that you have to be kidding.......right? Anyway, we live in an apartment with no faucet access for a hose inside or out.

I do know that a number of really serious fish/aquarium owners keep stored water and use it for water changes. These are folks with multiple tanks in different sizes. Even if we wanted to be that "serious" about the hobby, living in an apartment w/limited space wouldn't allow us to be.


Neither, hose it in straight from the tap.
 

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They make adapters to fit hoses to sinks. Local hardware store will hook you up. Pun intended ;-)
 

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At 37, I am too old to carry buckets. ROFLMAO! Just kidding. I actually use this wonderful product http://www.aqueonproducts.com/products/water-changer.htm

It hooks right up to my faucet. I turn on the tap to create suction and then when I am done vacuuming I use my thermometer to adjust temp to match tank temp and close the lever to redirect the water back through the hose to the tank. I add my dechlorinator for roughly the amount of water I took out and refill. I keep the hose above water level as this help gas off chlorine (chloramine [don't know if it is in my water] is not gassed and this is why I use API Tap Water Conditioner). I also move it back and forth so any temp changes are not in one spot. It also creates LOTS of bubbles. Sometimes with rearranging plants and picking off dead leaves it could take me 90+ minutes. I can't imagine carrying 2 gallons of water at a time to fill up 10-15 gallons in the tank. Not that I have far to go may 20 feet but I used carry bucket of tank water up stairs to empty and fresh water down stairs to fill.
 

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I surely wouldn't have the tanks I have if I had to use buckets.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Don't even need a hose to do a water change (up to 50%) in our 5 gallon tank! Connecting a hose to our faucet to do a partial water change sounds somewhat ridiculous......we are only changing 1 gallon to 2 1/2 gallons of water. Gotta say I'm definitely LOL!! Anyway, living in an apartment is not the same as living in a house or condo you're buying. When buying/living in a house or condo, you can pretty much do anything to it you want. Definitely not the case with apartment living.

Most experience "fish people" on forums live in houses where they can have multiple aquariums. We only have one and are pretty much sticking with just one.

All I wanted to find out was.........is the water the same (freshness) whether being stored in a container until it's "water change time" or coming directly out of tap into a container and then into the tank? My wife think the water from the tap into a container and directly into the aquarium would be much fresher than water be stored. Heck, I don't know.

They make adapters to fit hoses to sinks. Local hardware store will hook you up. Pun intended ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Not to get off of my topic, but I'm wondering how many of you who have multiple aquariums have other pets as well..........as in dogs and/or cats?
 

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I live in an apartment with my 125s, 90 and little tanks.

I use the water changer (but not the pump) on the little tanks too. For less than a 5 gallon, I don't think it would be worthwhile though. 10 gallon? Absolutely. 5 gallon - can go either way.

I have 2 chihuahuas.

My girlfriend, agent13, has all her tanks, 4 dragons, 2 kids and a dog. When I move down there in September, we will have 5 big tanks, 4 dragons, 3 dogs, 2 kids and NO BIRDS!
 

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Not to get off of my topic, but I'm wondering how many of you who have multiple aquariums have other pets as well..........as in dogs and/or cats?
I have a 50 gallon, a 2 gallon (in the process of upgrading to 10 gallon) and 2 cats.

If my husband would let me I would set up my 35 gallon hex tank. He does;t understand the need for multiple tanks.

I do use the water changer to suck water out of the 2 gallon and then I fill a bucket with water to refill it. It is only a betta in this tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, from what we understand, nobody in our apt complex has an aquarium, but us. And, with the furniture we got, there is just enough room for this hexagon tank and that's pretty much it.

I still believe that most "Aquarist" live in houses........with the number of tanks that I've seen that members have, it would take a house to have them. IMO, that is.

I live in an apartment with my 125s, 90 and little tanks.

I use the water changer (but not the pump) on the little tanks too. For less than a 5 gallon, I don't think it would be worthwhile though. 10 gallon? Absolutely. 5 gallon - can go either way.

I have 2 chihuahuas.

My girlfriend, agent13, has all her tanks, 4 dragons, 2 kids and a dog. When I move down there in September, we will have 5 big tanks, 4 dragons, 3 dogs, 2 kids and NO BIRDS!
 

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I think you're right as far as the big tanks are concerned. But I don't think tank size dictates how serious someone is about the hobby. There are many with small tanks that are much more serious about the hobby than I am, despite my 450 gallons of fish tanks. All that shows is I've made a serious investment in the hobby. Doesn't make me more serious about keeping fish. I couldn't care less about breeding the fish, or about keeping plants. I don't know about lighting, don't care about water chemistry. I think the serious hobbyist that you speak of has a more complete knowledge base of the hobby than the number or size of their tanks might show.
 
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agreed it depends greatly, on what you are doing and how you prefer to setup. its not hard to fit a lot of tanks in a smallish area. Also the amount of time it takes to care for varies for setups. I have 7 tanks about 160g, and about 60g kept in storage bins, in an apartment and more empty tanks stored.
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Discussion Starter #15
Well, to a Beginner, both of you would be pretty serious in the hobby........with that many tanks. Again, IMO.

From what I've read, wife and I are fairly old (age) to be Beginners in aquarium stuff. We are in our mid 60's and sure don't see people at LFS in that age bracket in the fish/aquarium section looking for their first aquarium as a Beginner.

Anyway, we do appreciate the help we are getting here, but we sure didn't intend to have this aquarium costly for us. We have a 20 foot power boat for that. LOL

Actually, the next forums we will get involved with will be for dogs, since that will be our next pet. A Shih Tzu.
 

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So you see that there are many ways to do water changes. Mostly it really doesn't matter how you do it as long as you're doing it to provide the best environment for your fish.
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Actually, the next forums we will get involved with will be for dogs, since that will be our next pet. A Shih Tzu.

Oh no! Stay away from dog forums! Only things worse are parenting and political forums.....
 

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Wow this topic got busy after I mentioned my hose!
 
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Wow this topic got busy after I mentioned my hose!
Shouldn't have gone flashing your hose about then ;-)

All I wanted to find out was.........is the water the same (freshness) whether being stored in a container until it's "water change time" or coming directly out of tap into a container and then into the tank? My wife think the water from the tap into a container and directly into the aquarium would be much fresher than water be stored. Heck, I don't know.
Assuming that the container is protected and the amount of stuff that can be absorbed from the surrounding environment is limited then there should be very little difference between what is coming out of the tap and water that you are storing (bearing in mind the amount of time you are likely to be storing it for). Obviously the water chemistry can alter over the first 24hrs (as in the pH over here). Whether you can use water straight out of the tap will depend upon the chemistry of that water and the chemistry of the tank itself. I store and cycle the RO mix for three days and have it circulating in a tank which has a cover glass but is far from 'air tight' and the TDS during that time alters by only a few points. If you have been storing water in the bottles and have not had an issue then I would continue with that as it is working for you and doesn't seem to be a problem, I certainly wouldn't worry about storing for a short period of time.
 

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I know people who have to alter their water chemistry before adding it to the tank - they use a holding tank to prepare the water prior to the water change and simply pump it to their tank.
 
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