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Hi there! What size tank is this? Needless to say, if you want your fry to survive you will have to remove them, that's a tank full of predator fish. :)
 

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Hey again John.
There are quite a few stocking issues with this tank, that I can only start to address. I'll go in order. First, the African knife, 45 gallons is just a tad small for one of these fish- I'd say more along 60 gallons would be suitable for one. Not the biggest issue in this tank right now, however. He will enjoy feasting on platy fry. Actually, every single fish in this tank will enjoy feasting on platy fry --minus perhaps the plecos-- so again if you want survivors I'd remove them.

Next, African leaf fish-- two fish are commonly sold by this name. Which one of these does your leaf fish look like:




These are two very different fish, so it's important to know. My suspicions are that you have the first one pictured, as the second fish is a much more delicate species.

Moving onwards, your two Bala Shark. I am no expert in freshwater sharks, but a quick glance at our profile says they grow to 14", like schools, and need at least a 6' long tank (125 gallons). If possible I'd rehome them while they're smaller, as small fish are easier to get rid of. You can click the highlighted name to view their profile, also.

I am not completely sure what your "Silvertip shark" really is, maybe someone else could chime in on that one.

Your Plecostomus, how big is he? Chances are he will also outgrow your tank.

Your albino pleco, by small, do you mean he is a bristlenose perhaps? It'd help to know what species this is.

Glass barb, again, not sure exactly what species this truly is, but the school is a little slim right now.

Your danio school is definitely too small, I'd get at least three more. However, do not purchase anymore fish until you sort out what's currently in there.

Needless to say, some fish are going to have to go, I would not keep those big sharks or other predators in with smaller barbs, danios, and platy. If you are fond of any of the larger fish I listed, I would definitely invest in a much larger tank for them.

This is a lot of info to take in, at this point I'd be choosing between "the big guys" and an upgrade, or the smaller community guys and clearing out the larger fish.
 

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Help

The Thing Is, It Is My Brothers tankk Cause he lives with us. so i really cant just go in there and say to take it out. we've had the tank for a while, no issues.
1- The First Leaf FIsh Is The One I Have
2- The Bala Sharks Arent Really A Big Growing Fish. There Not Even Really Sharks.
3- The Silvertip Shark Is Basically A Very Small Version Of A Catfish, Once Again...Not A Real Shark..
4- The Knife Fish just keeps to himself in the rock decor we have in there. he doesnt pick on the other fish. or do they pick on him. he doesnt even come out unless food is there or the light is off and its dark outside.
5- Honestly, This Is The Only Thing We Could Think Of Considering Our First Time Having Fry And The Last Minute Decision. The Danio Were Eating Every Fry That Came From The Mom, So I Put Her Into A Larger container Just so she can have them and most of them can live. then put them back in there. but as of now. only 2 fry have survived :( But we took a net that was for the tank and layed it across the hood so it hangs in the water, but no fish can get in, and the fry are safe but still in the same environment.and the fry is in the net. (2 of the fry lived) <-- And That Was Just Tonight. I Also Heard That She Will Have 2 More Batches Of Fry Within The next week or 2. and ill post a pic when i can of the tank so you have an idea.
6- the regular plecostomus is about 2 1/2 - 3 inches. and the albino is about 1 inch.
the picture is a close resemblance i found online. it is not a bristlenose, that is for sure.
 

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Ya. That silvertip shark isn't a small catfish. It's a large migratory species that grows about foot long. What you have is a baby. Sources here Ariopsis seemanni - Planet Catfish and here Ariopsis seemanni (Colombian Shark Catfish) - Seriously Fish as we don't have it in our profiles.

Glass barbs just appear to be a color morph of the common rosy barb (neat trick about this forum is that when you see a name highlighted, you can click on that for more info).

Olympia has pointed out the major problems in your stocking. And they are serious. Just because the fish appear fine to you doesn't mean they actually are. Fish can't communicate stress as well as dogs and cats can. I highly suggest that you rehome everything except the platies and the danio. Tell your brother to do the research on these fish. He'll see the problems.
 

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Jeez: What do want us to say, John? Everything will be okay if you only believe?

Your Bro made some horrible, impulsive and uneducated choices and this tank represents a looming disaster in the making. (At least I think it was your brother, but maybe you just said that to throw us off the trail. If it's your brother's tank, how come you bought the fish? If you bought the fish, why can't you behave responsibly and re-home them? Pick a story, and stick with it, man!)

If you bought these at a fish store, chances are they will take them back. They may even trade you for something more appropriate.

All the information posted so far with respect to these species is spot on, based on my experience and reading.

Balas may not be large now, but ideally should be housed in groups in very large tanks (more than 125 gallons). They grow to more than a foot in length and are timid, tending not to do as well singly or in pairs.

Columbian Bull shark Catfish is a predatory cat that, as it grows, will be able to eat adult platies, not just their fry. It will be able to eat danios, it will be able to eat glass barbs. At about a foot long or more at maturity, it has a voracious appetite and a large mouth to easily accomodate small fish. As I see it, this is the most "dangerous" fish you have to the majority of current tank residents.

Leaf fish are beautifully camouflaged predators and the baby platies make excellent leaf-fish food. I am surprised any remain. Depending on what species they are, they may grow large enough to eat larger prey, which would mean other fish in the tank will be in jeopardy.

Virtually everyone is told to buy a pleco to eat algae, but plecos are more trouble than they're worth UNLESS you actually do like them and want them. But as for eating algae, they never seem to eat the kind you have, or eat it from wherever you wish they would, or eat enough of it. Add to that the fact that these also become huge fish that make large amounts of waste and you realize they do not clean your tank, they simply add to the problem. Even if you have a pleco or two that eat a little algae, you are now more responsible than ever for maintenance and water changes, and now at an even greater frequency and volume owing to the huge bioload they add in this tank. Re-home them and get smaller bristlenose or Ancistrus cats, if you truly want loricarid catfish. Only if you want them. Seriously, despite everything you have been told, they ARE NOT NECESSARY to a successful tank.

The whole stocking plan needs to be redone, top to bottom.

At this point I would re-home the plecos, Balas and Columbian (silvertip) catfish unless you have a 125 where they can go immediately. They will either outgrow the space, or simply die (a more likely situation) from being cramped and kept in water conditions that will be increasingly difficult to keep well.

The leaf fish should be in their own tank, because they are predatory and will be looking for the opportunity to ambush whatever they can fit in their mouths.

I would keep the platies, danios and glass barbs, and work from there: even so, I would like to know the exact species we are dealing with here before making recommendations: "3 danios I think" requires some further explanatiuon.

The current stocking plan is like extreme cage fighting: many go in but very few will get out of this alive.
 

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Columbian Bull shark Catfish is a predatory cat that, as it grows, will be able to eat adult platies, not just their fry. It will be able to eat danios, it will be able to eat glass barbs. At about a foot long or more at maturity, it has a voracious appetite and a large mouth to easily accomodate small fish. As I see it, this is the most "dangerous" fish you have to the majority of current tank residents.

Leaf fish are beautifully camouflaged predators and the baby platies make excellent leaf-fish food. I am surprised any remain. Depending on what species they are, they may grow large enough to eat larger prey, which would mean other fish in the tank will be in jeopardy.
I just want to add.. if this is indeed a Columbian shark, it will die soon. It sounds harsh, but there's no avoiding this one. Young Columbian sharks are born in fresh water, however as they grow they must be acclimated into brackish water --at least-- and preferably full salt water. This is not an easy fish to keep for this reason.

The "leaf fish" in question is Ctenopoma acutirostre, another large predator reaching 6-8". Commonly known as leopard ctenopoma or spotted climbing perch. :)
 

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So I guess the leaf fish is the true danger to the tank. And "John0216" is the true danger to the Columbian Bull Shark Catfish!
 

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I agree with what other members have posted.

You may think all is well now, but i can assure you it is not. You simply cannot combine non-compatible fish in a small space without the fish being harmed by the stress all the issues mentioned do cause them.

To put it in another context which may make sense since many of us can relate more to dogs and cats: you can't put a vicious dog in a closed room with a cat and not expect trouble. And that is what has happened here in this aquarium. Some tough decisions will have to be made or the fish will suffer, as they already are. This is a fact of science, not just someone's opinion.

Byron.
 

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Byron makes a valid point which we do not much like hearing as aquarists: some of this information leaves the realm of opinion and is as close to "covering law" as you can get within the hobby. Some fish plain and simple cannot ever be made to work in the same tank with certain others or in a tank of a certain size or in solitude, apart from the company of their kind.

We want what we want, but considering the immensity of the water systems these animals left in order to pace about in the glass boxes we call fish tanks, we would do better to want the best for the fish, first and foremost. We would do better to work out a viable stocking plan in the first place, rather than working on other people, after the fact, to tell us things that we know, instinctively, will be bad, unworkable advice.

So my hope is that John will let us help him fix the problem, here, and quit resisting. I know you can ask another ten so-called experts and some of them may tell you what you want to hear. But whatever they tell you, seriously John, most of these fish are doomed. After the trouble starts, the people who tell you this is a good combination of fish will not have good advice to share. . .

Look around, John: this is a damned fine group of aquatic helpers you have here!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Help

Byron makes a valid point which we do not much like hearing as aquarists: some of this information leaves the realm of opinion and is as close to "covering law" as you can get within the hobby. Some fish plain and simple cannot ever be made to work in the same tank with certain others or in a tank of a certain size or in solitude, apart from the company of their kind.

We want what we want, but considering the immensity of the water systems these animals left in order to pace about in the glass boxes we call fish tanks, we would do better to want the best for the fish, first and foremost. We would do better to work out a viable stocking plan in the first place, rather than working on other people, after the fact, to tell us things that we know, instinctively, will be bad, unworkable advice.

So my hope is that John will let us help him fix the problem, here, and quit resisting. I know you can ask another ten so-called experts and some of them may tell you what you want to hear. But whatever they tell you, seriously John, most of these fish are doomed. After the trouble starts, the people who tell you this is a good combination of fish will not have good advice to share. . .

Look around, John: this is a damned fine group of aquatic helpers you have here!
You guys are a great help. but im just saying. i dont have the funds to rehome these fish or even talk to my brother about it. he is very hard headed and i told him but he says there fine. i said more than 6 people said something but hes still sticking with his idea of ok.
 

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Well, at least the Columbian shark died, right? :-( One less problem in the tank. I'm afraid the only way your brother will learn is by watching his fish die one by one. Some people don't listen to sound advice.
 

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Re-homing fish requires no funds. You bag them up, take them back and if they are still in saleable shape, try to negotiate a trade for something that will work.

I am still confused as to why you said you spent "Good money" on these fish yet continue to claim you can't do anything with regard to this tank because it is your brother's.

Come clean about whose tank this is and who the heck's in charge of it. This is the stuff that makes me impatient: prevarication!

And feel free to take our advice or not, but as Olympia mentions, it won't be pretty going forward.

The Bala sharks WILL DIE. It makes much more sense to try to get something for them now, rather than wait to flush them.
 

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I'm just going to step out and say-- we've done all we can, I think it's best not to go about this in an aggressive manner and back off for now. There's no need to continue this in such a manner, if John ever decides he wants to change things, he shouldn't be afraid to come back here and ask for advice again.

:)
 
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