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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking of purchasing the smallest external canister filter available to maintain the conditions of a (approx. 5G) fish bowl.

My dilemma is that even the smallest canister filter will still be too strong/powerful for the bowl.

I'm wondering if the canister filter pumps out 200 L/H, can I use valves/clamps on the tubing to possibly slow down the flow to 50 L/H?

My main concern is, would this have any adverse affect to the running of the powerhead/impeller?
 

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Sorry I can't help. I just use plants with no filters.




My .02
 

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I assume you're looking to add water volume? I would ditch the canister and make either a sump or bog filter for it. I filled an external breeder box with matrix/plants/sponges, added a pump and it was ready to go. It's slow enough for that size, but using an air pump only (over an electric) wasn't enough to circulate. Slowing the intake of a canister filter will kill the motor and you're asking for a disaster to slow the outtake that much.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My dilemma is the fish bowl is pretty well established with shrimp, a pair of breeding Endlers & is fully planted & hard-scaped with driftwood & rocks.

I have a sponge filter (powered by an air pump) inside the bowl, however it kept dislodging & floating so I glued a plastic base to it & then buried the base beneath gravel, rock & plants. It was only weeks later I realised I wouldn't be able to successfully detach the sponge itself for cleaning purposes without dislodging the gravel & rock & possibly endangering the shrimp in the process.

That's why I started playing with the notion of a small external canister filter.

I also thought of customising an above sump/trickle filter but being a round fish bowl, the unit would block & reduce the light source for the plants.

I think I'm just going to have to accept that the sponge is going to be a permanent fixture & rely on the shrimp to hopefully feast on the waste that builds up...

Now I'm wondering what would be more beneficial?

A 20% weekly water change OR a 50% monthly change?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Originally the bowl was simply just for plants & snails.
A nice self-sufficient ornamental piece with the sponge filter to stop the water from going stagnant.

Then I found some shrimp in another tank & decided to transfer them to the bowl. Surprisingly they seem to be thriving better in the bowl than the tank. Then came the pair of Endlers.
 

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If it were me I would remove the filter and stop doing water changes and just replace the water that evaporates with no chemicals added.


Looks to me like you have a nice balanced out eco system that should not be disturbed.


But that's just me and my .02
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Cheers BBob, the filter needs to stay. As I mentioned the filter's pretty much grounded into the gravel...too much of the tank would be disturbed by attempting to remove it.

I'm pretty comfortable at this stage with the notion of no water changes.
But once the Endlers (& shrimp) start multiplying I may feel the need to do minimal water changes in the future.
 
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