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Almost five weeks ago, I started a new 60g saltwater tank. I cycled the tank with live rock and two weeks in, my levels looked good. I added a Coral Beauty, Black Sebae Clownfish, and a Firefish. My levels increased across the board immediately but through water changes and cleanings, I was able to stabilize the tank. Now, I realize it was too much too quick.

About five days ago, I noticed my Firefish's organs behind his gills looking red and some fin rot. Two days ago, I started seeing red lesions (look like scratches or popped blood vessels) on his abdomen toward his tail. I attached two pics to show you what I am talking about.

I have read that this may be a bacterial infection. The issue seems to be aggravated by the fact that my Clownfish has started to be aggressive toward the Firefish and has begun to nip at him. Any suggestions for treatment and protecting the Firefish so he recovers?

Salinity 1.023
Ammonia: 0ppm
Nitrite: 0ppm
Nitrate: 4ppm
PH: 8.2

My Clownfish also has an abnormal growth which started two weeks ago. I am posting a separate question for help dealing with that.
 

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Can you remove the aggressor or better yet do you have access to a quarantine tank? If you can get a tank setup with water from your main tank along with some seasoned filter media,rock,and a small amount of live sand\crushed coral you can get a decent quarantine going.If you plan on treating for anti bacterial or copper of any sort you can skip the live rock and sand and be ready to do several water changes. In fact with any treatments you want to have water on hand incase of fluctuations in ammonia or more sensitive fish reacting negatively to the medications.

I prefer a quarantine that has a lower salinity to weaken the offenders in question.

Did the ammonia get high in your tank? That can cause burns on the gill area especially sensitive fish like the fire fish.

The salt water hobby is very unforgiving in certain respects.
 

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Can you remove the aggressor or better yet do you have access to a quarantine tank? If you can get a tank setup with water from your main tank along with some seasoned filter media,rock,and a small amount of live sand\crushed coral you can get a decent quarantine going.If you plan on treating for anti bacterial or copper of any sort you can skip the live rock and sand and be ready to do several water changes. In fact with any treatments you want to have water on hand incase of fluctuations in ammonia or more sensitive fish reacting negatively to the medications.

I prefer a quarantine that has a lower salinity to weaken the offenders in question.

Did the ammonia get high in your tank? That can cause burns on the gill area especially sensitive fish like the fire fish.

The salt water hobby is very unforgiving in certain respects.
Thanks for the tips. I plan on setting up a QT today given the symptoms exhibited by my fish. I read about using a hypo salinity tank. What level salinity do you recommend?

Ammonia got as high as 2.0ppm. If high ammonia is the culprit that would explain the redness around the gills but what about the lesions/scratches on the abdomen? Any additional advice you can offer would be much appreciated.
 

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To get the full benefits of hyposalinity you can bring it down to .010 but some fishes don't take it so well and I start off at about .017 and change that depending on the treatment and fish. It is also possible the fish acquired the damage form fleeing as they tend to dart about and under rocks rather fast or it could be from a confrontation.You may be able to get the clown out and keep the water chemistry pristine then target feed the fire fish good frozen foods and see if he recovers naturally.
 
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