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DanaJ said:
My fiance's coworker(who has a 35 gallon tank, I think) mentioned an under gravel filter (?) Are they good generally or should they be used for specific tanks etc? Pros and Cons?
UG filters are considered old-fashioned nowadays. If you want plants, UG filters are not recommended as they cause too much disturbance on the plant roots which can upset the plants.
If your substrate is sand, UGFs will clog easily. There is a tendency for UGFs to create anaerobic(or dead) spots which can harm your fish as dead spots simply release toxic substances.
Cleaning is often done by an almost strip-down of the tank.

I have no idea how reverse-flow undergravel filter actually works but here is the link about it unless some members here provide lots of information about it.:) I've never gone to this matter yet.:)
 

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DanaJ said:
I'm definately into bottom feeders like algae eaters(smaller kinds).
Choose either otos or BNs.:)
Avoid the Chinese Algae Eater which are often sold as 'Algae Eater'. There is a lot of horrible truth behind this 'cute' face.:shake: Juveniles do consume algae but as they mature, they have a tendency to become more aggressive and eat the slime off the fish. The slime is actually a mucous membrane which is the protective covering of the fish. Removal of this results into vulnerability of fish to diseases.

Good luck with the plan.:thumbsup: To tell you the truth, this one is the most exciting part when it comes to setting up the tank.:mrgreen:
 

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DanaJ said:
Wow okay, that was really interesting about what you said in regards to the chinese algae eater! I had no idea at all! I'm glad you said something, I wouldn't have known. What else should I know about them, if anything?
We've had lots of people complaining about CAEs when they bought them.:shake: Those fish have been harassing their tankmates to death. I had them before and I never wanted to recall those horrible scenarios where they chased other fish to death and even suck the slime off most of my fish.:sob:

Will dig more options for you.:)

Siamese Algae Eater
These fish are excellent at consuming black brush algae which are often hard to remove. Growing to almost 5 inches, they are peaceful but have a tendency to bicker on the members of their own species.
These fish seem long-lived. At least in my experience.
(Come to think of it. I'm about to celebrate my SAE's five years birthday :crazy: )

Oh, in case you don't know, try to feed the BNs with veggies. If not, they'll turn into the live plants for food.:blink: Lettuce, cucumber, zucchini are a few ones I can mention.:)
 

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DanaJ said:
Do they do well with others kinds of algae eaters or do you think they're best with their own, and if so how many should I get?
Only one. SAEs tend to bicker with each other. They are peaceful with other species though.
I had no idea about the veggie thing! It is amusing in a way!
Lol...I did find this one amusing the first time I heard plecs need veggies or they'll turn to the plants.:sarcastic: :mrgreen:

I think we've had too much with bottom dwellers.:crazy: What about the surface and mid levels?:)

Danios and hatchets are good options for the surface. Do ensure you have glass covers as hatchets love to jump. Floating plants also discourage jumping.

Someone here has Glowlight Danios(Danio choprae).
Here's the thread.:)

As for surface, there are many species of barbs, rasboras and tetras to choose. I prefer the Nannostomus beckfordi, Cardinal tetras and Diamond tetras for mid level. Diamonds are so stunning.:love:
If you want rasboras, go with Rasbora heteromorpha or Rasbora hengeli. If you want a go with some expensive nano fish, Galaxy Rasboras are great.:love: They are new to the hobby so you'll find them very expensive.
Cherry barbs are what I'd prefer in the barb category.

You don't have to choose all of them. You can choose which species you like. The more in number, the lesser in species is better than having too many species and then having less in number per species.:sarcastic: Way hard to understand this statement.:sob:
 

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DanaJ said:
Any suggestions on an easier way to research different types of fish easily? Like a chart with a photo description, and important info about each fish? Something all in one place?
I had made a list of lots of fish species months ago.:) Not complete but the list has almost everything that are commonly available in your lfs.:)
Characins
Cyprinids
As there are several species of danionins and rasboras, I had to link the wikipedia to the thread. There's not much time to even keep updating the list.

Here's one for Galaxy Rasboras.

PlanetCatfish: Cat-eLog(Corydoras)
Note that you can't see all species in the market. Some of the cories were never imported at all hence you rarely can see some of those cories.

Nannostomus beckfordi
Diamond Tetra
 

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musho3210 said:
DO NOT GET A RED TAIL SHARK, THEY NEED LIKE 1000 GALLON TANKS!!!

Red tail sharks arent peacefull and they grow very very very big. Do not get these for a 29 gallon tank. I dont think a 29 gallon can fit any sharks....
I was positive you're referring to Red-tailed catfish, rather than Red-tailed black shark.:)
29 gallons is ok as long as there are lots of hiding places provided for it to stake a territory but I will warn you that with a labeo, it limits your choices of fish as they get quite aggressive.:shake:
 

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Neons should be fine. Don't worry about NTD. It rarely occurs. As long as you maintain the tank well, you don't have to worry about diseases, etc.:)

Try lemon tetras, diamond tetras and beacon tetras. Nice fish.:love: :thumbsup:
 

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tophat665 said:
I lost 3 of my last 10 neons to NTD. They just have to be isloated IMMEDIATELY when you suspect they have it, and it won't spread. Not a big deal in a 99 cent schooling fish (sucks to be the fish, mind you).
I was not saying that if there is NTD, leave it alone. Of course, you have to remove the afflicted or suspected fish immediately. NTD rarely happens but if suspected, then isolation here it goes. NTD can happen but I wouldn't worry too much about it. Just get along with tank maintenance rather than trying to think about NTD which could destroy your pleasures of enjoying the hobby.
 

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Hi Dana.:wave:

What's your stocking plan so far?:mrgreen:

Hope everything goes well.:)
 

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DanaJ said:
I do like the neon or cardinal tetras, although I don't know if they are worth the risk of NTD. I understand if I keep up on other things, it sounds like a small chance.
Cardinals would be your better choice if you don't like neons.:) Cardinals apparently are immune to NTD so have a go with this one.:)
Again, I'm going to bring up the red tailed black shark. Apparently it's not really a shark, grows to be around 5 inches and is generally good in a community tank. Does anybody have one of these, or can give me more info?
RTBS are pretty territorial and in a 29 gallons tank, it can easily harass other tankmates so best to leave it for a 55 gallons where there is more space for it to stake out territories.
Does anyone have banded rummy nose tetra?
I haven't heard of banded rummies. There are 3 species you can look into. Hard to explain the differences.:shake:
Petitella georgiae
Hemigrammus rhodostomus
Hemigrammus bleheri
 

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I have heard from veteran fishkeepers that their neons keep dying compared to their past experiences. My father is also in disbelief as he used to keep neons before and they don't die unless they reach old age or if afflicted with diseases. Problem is their quality(more like genetics) is declining due to inbreeding and mass production.:shake:

Water quality also plays one of those factors responsible for the survival of the neons.

Edited to correct something.:crazy:
 

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musho3210 said:
well since ntd wont really kill your danios (hopefully) i think it will be fine to have neons. If you have good water quality, healthy diet, loving care, i think your fish wont have NTD let alone any sickness.
I agree. Tiptop water conditions will reduce the chances of any diseases afflicting the fish. Dirty water will make matters worse.:shake:
 

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musho3210 said:
so now that weve covered tetras, why guarmie do you want (how do you spell guarmie the correct way?)
Gourami.:mrgreen:
I prefer honey gourami(Colisa sota).
 

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DanaJ said:
LOL is that type of kissing gourami NON agressive or what?
They are non-aggressive.:) They just have a tendency to treat small fish as snacks.
Would just avoid this species unless you plan an upgrade.:)
 

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DanaJ said:
Can you get java moss at your LPS? Is it hard to maintain? I don't really know anything about java moss and the aquarium :oops: Would it be okay if that was the only actual living plant? I don't really intend to have any live plants in this aquarium, but if java moss is easy, maybe:)
Nope. Javan moss are quite easy to maintain. They do not demand too much lighting so a 1wpg(watt per gallon) should suffice.:)
It's fine to have one species of plant. You will want more though. Elodea densa is another plant I recommend. Undemanding and fast growers.
Other plants worth a try are hornworts(Ceratophyllum demersum) and Javan fern.
Javan ferns are low-light plants but they are quite slow growers so don't expect any much growth from them.

By the way, I'm thinking you are referring to Colisa labiosa as the thick-lipped gourami. They should be fine in your tank. Provide your tank with floating plants such as elodeas and hornworts.
Oh and the side note for you. You'll notice some dangling white roots on the elodeas. Not a problem. They just look messy but I love messy-looking tanks if they are because of dangling roots.:crazy:
 

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DanaJ said:
So it's basically necessary to have floating live plants if you want gouramis?
I'm not sure I'm ready for that step!
I wouldn't even know where to put the moss either. I'm a mess! :oops:
There's nothing wrong with a messy-looking tank because of the plants.:mrgreen: The gouramis do like to have territories. They are anabantids hence they have a preference for dwelling on surface areas. There are exceptions though. Some anabantids differ from each other so the rule of dwelling too much on surface will not apply on every species of anabantids.
 

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DanaJ said:
Ahh okay, I read they do tend to stay toward the surface bc they need air.
Can they be fake plants at the top?;)
Oh and yes those were the thick lipped ones I was referring to.
Doesn't matter if your plants would be fake or live. I prefer live ones though. They can consume excess nitrates thereby ensuring the nitrates won't exceed to dangerous levels which would inhibit your fish's growth and even kill them. I prefer elodeas for floating plants.

If you want duckweeds(Lemna minor), prepare for trouble.:mrgreen: Because they can reproduce so fast that they are almost impossible to control.:shake: Good at clogging filter intakes and depriving other plants of light. Hence they are considered as 'pests'.:wink2:

There are advantages though. They discourage your fish from jumping if your tank is open-topped and serve as hiding sanctuaries for fry.:)
 

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DanaJ said:
Question: Could you get 2 gouramis of differing varieties? What about a pair of gouramis, and a pair of dwarfs? Just curious.
I'd stick to only a pair in the dwarf gourami's case. Males are often aggressive against each other. It may be possible having two pairs of honey gouramis as I don't see them getting very aggressive at all.
 

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DanaJ said:
Hm okay interesting. I definately like the male gouramis. Not a huge fan of the females, but we'll see and think about the situation and stocking list:)
Not a good idea to have all males. Male gouramis often bicker with each other so the presence of females would be recommended. My lfs had a tank full of male dwarf gouramis(females are so rare here) and I was shocked that most of them have their fins already torn badly.:shake:
Male dwarf gouramis tend to be aggressive. I had one without the female and he guarded his territory aggressively. Mind you, he creates a bubblenest using bits of plants and thread algae.:shock2: Whether you have females or not, it's best not to have more than one male gourami in a 29 gallons.:)
 

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bettababy said:
As for rummynose tetras, again you're talking about a "difficult" fish to keep. IF you can get them to settle in, they tend to thrive, but the hard part is getting them to settle in to begin with. Rummynose will be less tolerant of condition changes, much more prone to stress, and need extremely passive tank mates, such as the neons. I'm not sure I'd mix the rummynose with fiesty danios, as the stress of the chasing would be a bit much for them.
Agreed on this. I've tried rummies before and they seem a trouble to even transport.:shake: IMO, transporting them to your home proves very tricky. I struggled with three batches.
First-8 out of 10 died
Second-2 out of 13 died
Third-None died
The reason the mortality rate was decreasing is because I sorted it out to myself that the plastic bag should be laid horizontally to allow bigger surface area. This alone also confuses me at times.:shake: :wink2:
The other solution come up by the lfs employee is taping all corners of the plastic bag to prevent the rummies from trapping themselves which could easily kill them.

As for compatibility with danios, it can be done as long as your tank is heavily-planted. Thickets of plants give them a sense of security thus reducing stress which could easily kill them.

Another thing is they often serve as indicators of your water quality. Anything wrong with your water quality and their bright red coloration on the pretty heads will fade.

Pls be careful when selecting tankmates for them. They are often victimized by tankmates into harassments. I struggled to keep them alive in my tank mostly because some of my fish like the blue rams love to hunt them down and even kill them.:shake: 'Tis a great disappointment for such beautiful rummies.:sob:
 
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