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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ive noticed that the plants on just one side of my tank are dying. I just figured at first that I had just got some bad plants and that was the reason. But I decided to swap some of the plants around and now the ones that were once healthy (on the other side of the tank) are browning and the ones that were doing rough are now doing ok. The healthy side is the same side as where my filter inlet is. Could that have something to do with it? The plants in question seem to only be my amazon swords. There are a few java ferns and some water wisteria in the tank as well and they do just fine regardless of where in the tank they are planted. Thanks
 

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I am not a plant expert. I am just going to share some thoughts and ideas based on several books I have. One book is, "The Natural Aquarium," by Satoshi Yoshno and Doshin Kabayashi 1995.

My experience, (and what the books say), is that Amazon Swords need high lighting requirements. A tank your size should have 60 watt incandescent, which is 800 Lumens, or around 20 CFL. They are saying to keep the lights on 15 hours a day, unless it is next to a window, and in that case 12 hours a day.

They use river sand, (again I am just using gravel myself). At least a sand/gravel combination seems to be what the books say is best.

They are using a canister filter for two of their tanks, but for the all swordplant tank they are using an outside filter with three chambers.

They have about 20 fish showing in their pictures.

They do a water change 1/3 every 2 weeks.

They use fertilizer. Perhaps, your Catfish population is a bit too high? Those fish could be eating nutrients that the plants need?

Here is a big difference that I think you have hit the nail on the head as to the problem. I think that it is possible that your filter situation you are talking about is somehow breaking up the CO2 on one side of the tank. Amazon Swordplants love CO2! The only time I have had success is adding CO2. The book says to add CO2, and the Japanese independent fish store also had great success adding liquid CO2. In the old days they added CO2 by overpopulating the tank with fish.

If you are not doing it, and you can on a 29 gallon, you should make a CO2 Generator. How to Make a CO2 Reactor for an Aquarium: 11 Steps - wikiHow This is easy to do with a 2 Liter bottle!
It will last for around 2 weeks and then will need to be changed again. 1 to 2 cups of Sugar, 1/2 TSP Yeast, water and you ready to go. Cheap, and it works!
 

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Just a thought here. Swords are heavy root feeders and I find even with weekly vacuuming My fish..( most of them in all of my tanks) poop near the intake,,, and better yet around a plant in that area giving any rot feeder a better chance there. Have you tried root tabs? They do so soso well with with root tabs once per month and good lighting
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
All very good suggestions. I use a liquid fertilizer once a week following the dosing on the back. Its made by aqueon I believe. I'm about to do a lot of shifting though now that my main tank has finished cycling and most of my plants will be placed into my 10 gallon since I am converting the main tank to blackwater
 
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