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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there. I've posted several messages about pH changing greatly after allowing tap water to sit for 24+ hours.

I believe pH variation is what shocked our first betta last year.

Anyway, it seems there is a string sentiment here to simply use warm water straight from the tap and that allowing water to age is an outdated/unnecessary step for healthy fish.

I found this great article: http://www.ratemyfishtank.com/articles/107

I'm hoping a similar article will be posted here.

My tap water pH goes from 7.4 to 8.2 in 24 hours. The tank stays steady at 8.2. Our 2nd betta seems to be thriving.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Water conditioner is great but cannot stabilize the pH instantly.
 

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Really interesting stuff! Thanks for the input! I'm glad I've never had to deal with this. . .my well planted tanks run the same Ph as tap - but it would be good to know that it's a possibility. I'm not so sure if all of the information in this article is correct, though. . . I'd like to see some stronger sources sited. Here is another interesting, and related article. . . http://www.cichlid-forum.com/articles/carbon_dioxide_planted_tank.php
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the article. It is interesting how plants can affect the pH by using up the carbon dioxide.

Since the pH of my tap water changes just from sitting in a bucket for 24 hours, and matches the tank pH, I don't think the plants in my tank are causing the high pH.

I'm sure many people have water with good buffering capabilities. Either due to the particular well water in my area or due to the whole house water softener system, my water doesn't have good buffering. For instance, the indian almond leaf has not affected the tank pH (but made all the little snails disappear).

If I don't keep some aged water on hand, I may cause a pH shock if I have to do an emergency water change.

It would be helpful if others did the experiment on their own water:

1) tap water fresh from the pipe pH
2) tap water sitting in a jar for 24 hours and again at 48 hours pH
3) water conditioned tap water fresh from the pipe pH
4) water conditioned tap water sitting in a jar for 24 hours and again at 48 hours pH
5) pH of tank before water change
6) pH of tank after water change

Other gases can be present in the water besides carbon dioxide.

The suggestion of the board is to keep a stable pH for the fish, without use of pH up/down chemicals, yet if one does not test, one cannot fully understand their particular pH situation.

Looking forward to more information on this - more dialog and a solution for folks who have unique water!
 

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You should really open a thread on this out on the open forum, where there will be a lot more people to see it and offer input. We aren't allowed to post links to other forums, but I'm betting you'll still find a lot of discussion about it. Maybe in our advanced discussion area? I know we have a LOT of different water types out there, and I'd love to hear what they would have to add to the discussion.

Link us up if you decide to, I'd love to follow that thread - and can think of a few members to point in that direction. . .

^.^
 

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Discussion Starter #5
OK. Thank you! I'll try.

Not one person has chimed in to support what I've found with my water which is why I posted here. I feel as if there is a strong sentiment that aging water is old fashioned/unnecessary/burdensome and not recommended.
 

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Well I think it's rather time consuming for some. There is no way I can deal with buckets for my 2 75 gallon tanks so we opt for speed sometimes.
I use a python hose straight from the tap... but I've never been one to do massive water changes unless it's an emergency...I'm more inclined to do 2 smaller ones back to back... dilute things down slower so to speak. Less shock.
I don't understand all the science to it either but do know that water finds its way back to its original PH when we try to change it. Maybe that is part of why it seems to "settle" to a PH value over the next 24 hours.
Frankly if there's a bucket of water sitting out, I'll find a way to trip over it or knock it over!!

Just be careful posting articles on the open forum... we can't post links to other forums if they are the same genre to our own. At the same time we must give credit where credit is due. It's a hard one to balance on a forum. Explaining or providing an answer to a question and not breaking a rule by sharing a link to read it elsewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sure. That would be a big issue for a large tank.

I'm referring to the betta fish community, bettafish.com, where tanks are typically 1.5-5 gallons and 50-100% water changes are not uncommon. Daily, twice weekly and/or weekly water changes are common for the betta fish tank. Sorry for not being more specific, I often forget that bettafish.com is just a small part of the greater website.
 
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