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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
hello. my nitrate test is showing 80ppm. and i thought it was supose to be around 25ppm so why do you guys think the reason behind this is and what can i do to prevent this if it is a bad thing
 

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Is this the API Master Test? If so, the NitrAte test is notorious for faulty readings. Shake it really, really, REALLY well, then when it's really well shaken, shake it some more. Be sure to follow the instructions for the tests too.

If you've done this and the levels are still high then a good way to reduce the levels is through weekly water changes.

What size tank is this, and how often are you doing water changes currently, and what percentage of the tank water are you changing?

It's also possible that your water source is naturally high in NitrAtes, so it's never a bad thing to test your tap water to see if that's the case.

I'm sure some others might have some ideas for you.
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
i am the petstore aqua keeper i have 5- 800L tanks and all reading realy high. i do a 25% water change on all my tanks every week and prime them daily from water evp and loss.

i will test them again. how bad is it for the fish to have nitrate lvls this high?

and i am useing the master test kit XD
 

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i am the petstore aqua keeper i have 5- 800L tanks and all reading realy high. i do a 25% water change on all my tanks every week and prime them daily from water evp and loss.

i will test them again. how bad is it for the fish to have nitrate lvls this high?

and i am useing the master test kit XD

Some argue that nitrAte level's need to exceed several hundred ppm, before they have negative effect on fishes,(I ain't one of these ) but elevated nitrAtes as a result of organic waste from fishes,food's, is an indication of dirty enviornment and larger weekly water changes,keep filter media clean, are fastest way to remove dissolved organics ,solids.
20 to 40 ppm is aim for most folk's and seem's to work well for fishes longterm health.
Maybe try changing 50 percent of water weekly, and see if this does not lower the Nitrate levels fairly quickly.
 

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This is a petstore? Five 200 gallon (800L) tanks would make for a rather small store.

However, stores always grossly overstock the tanks. More fish = more waste = more nitrates. Under 40 is a good goal, I would be 60 as the upper limit.

Larger stores have systems that continously change water throughout the entire day. You should definitely do 50% each week, and consider doing a mid-week change if that isn't enough.
 

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There is no magic number for nitrates; the goal is to keep nitrates low, as low as possible, and as close to zero as possible. Nitrate is a toxic substance to all fish. Some species tolerate higher levels than others, but long-term nitrate is harmful. None of the fish we maintain in aquaria live in natural habitats with nitrate levels much above zero, which should tell us something.

You haven't given us the nitrate number for your source water (presumably tap water), and if this is the issue or part of it, there are ways to handle it. If the nitrate is partially or solely occurring within the aquaria, then increasing water changes [50% weekly], lessening the fish density, curtailing feeding and having live plants that are relatively fast-growing (stem and floating plants are ideal) are all ways of handling it. I realize that if these are store tanks, you are under situations that would not be encountered by home aquarists, but the same practices apply.

Byron.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanx guys.

i will be testing the nitrate lvls when i get to work this morning.
since i work in a pet store i cant change the amount of fish i have in my tanks.

the 5 800L tanks are broken in to 50l tanks all connected to one sump wich in toatle contains 800l
not a massive part of the store but dose take up one wall.

i will put up another thread later on today about my normal water nitrate lvls. thanx for your help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
nitrate lvls

hi guys/ gals me again. i have tested the lvls in my normal water supply and there showing between 0ppm so i think somthing is wrong with my water. i will start doing a 25% water change 3 times a week starting today to try and decreass the nitraste lvls.

in the tanks i have alot of diffrent plants some in great health some in realy poor. will having more plantys in my tanks increase or decrease nitrate lvls. i will cut down on feeding aswell.

if anyone has any other ideas please let me know asap.
thanks
Velgore
 

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hi guys/ gals me again. i have tested the lvls in my normal water supply and there showing between 0ppm so i think somthing is wrong with my water. i will start doing a 25% water change 3 times a week starting today to try and decreass the nitraste lvls.

in the tanks i have alot of diffrent plants some in great health some in realy poor. will having more plantys in my tanks increase or decrease nitrate lvls. i will cut down on feeding aswell.

if anyone has any other ideas please let me know asap.
thanks
Velgore
Plant's that are thriving will help lower nitrate level's.
Plant's that are doing poorly or dieing, pollute the water rather than provide any benefit's.
 

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There is no magic number for nitrates; the goal is to keep nitrates low, as low as possible, and as close to zero as possible. Nitrate is a toxic substance to all fish. Some species tolerate higher levels than others, but long-term nitrate is harmful. None of the fish we maintain in aquaria live in natural habitats with nitrate levels much above zero, which should tell us something.

You haven't given us the nitrate number for your source water (presumably tap water), and if this is the issue or part of it, there are ways to handle it. If the nitrate is partially or solely occurring within the aquaria, then increasing water changes [50% weekly], lessening the fish density, curtailing feeding and having live plants that are relatively fast-growing (stem and floating plants are ideal) are all ways of handling it. I realize that if these are store tanks, you are under situations that would not be encountered by home aquarists, but the same practices apply.

Byron.
I believe 20 to 40 ppm Nitrate reading while not being perhap's a magic number,, will be acceptable for the health of most fishes we keep.
As for nitrate being toxic to all fish, studies do show that perhap's some species are much more tolerant than other's, but the studies done were in my view too brief to render a clear picture of long term exposure and effect's on embryo development, fry number's, etc, except for the few game fish that most studies were performed on.
Some studies on tropical's were also performed but they too were perhap's a week or two, and the concentration was increased rather quickly as opposed to observing the long term effect's of exposure.
I would submit that fish don't need to start dying,before they feel the effect's of organic waste in their enviornment. Fish don't get sick ,die,or heal ,overnight.


Nitrate level's as a result of inorganic mineral salt's such as KNO3 that many add to planted aquariums is much less harmful than the break down of organic substances(fish waste ,foods,) and subsequent nitrate reading's from same.
Many other 's in planted tank realm suggest that unless nitrate test is calibrated, (google calibrating nitrate test) that the number's our test kit's produce are questionable to useless.
My own expierience as well as many other's expieriences with nitrate from inorganic mineral KNO3 and
mineral's used in planted aquarium's have shown no ill effect's over a two year period with level's that would not be acceptable to me if as mentioned they were a result of break down of fish poop,fish food's, poor maint,etc.
I am on board with keeping enviornment clean by performing weekly water changes of 35 to 50 percent which will keep the fishe healthy and happy, planted tank, or unplanted.Maybe can get by with fewer water changes in planted aquariums but that is for another topic,.
Is no downside to performing water changes for fishes in closed system in my view.
 

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We often see a quibble about how much nitrate is 'acceptable' in the fish tank. Although not as lethally dangerous as ammonia and nitrite, nitrate is a poison to fish. As Byron documents, there is so little nitrate in 'wild' fresh water it can not be measured.

There would seem to be little point in attempting to debate how much poison [nitrate] is lethal in time.

Anything we can do to keep nitrate levels as close to zero as possible is to the benefit of the fish. For some, that means little more than routine weekly water changes of enough volume to dilute the pollution a sufficient amount. Others may require [more] plants, rigorous tank/filter maintenance, reduced feeding, reduced stock levels, source water correction, deep sand, de-nitrate filtration and/or other means to keep nitrates at bay.

The worthy objective of every fishkeeper is to achieve and maintain the purest water possible in the tank.

With very high nitrates in my well water, I fight the fight every day.
 

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I understand that your nitrates, at least, are a problem with your tap water. It sounds like there are ways of dealing with the tap water.

I wanted to share my experience with testing nitrates when I was still cycling my tank. I used the API salt/freshwater test kit, and it gave me a way-out reading of 80 ppm. I eventually bought The API Master Test Kit and the nitrate values were the same as those at the pet store.
 
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