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Discussion Starter #1
i was wondering, im looking to put newts african underwater frogs and some other kind of fish in my new tank. The thing is, one, im not sure how much land newts actually need. Two can small tetras or fancy guppies go with newt or underwater frogs. I know that the newts ad frogs go together, so thats not an issue. All posts are greatly appreciated
 

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I wouldn't really go for guppies. They can only produce too fast.
Why not stick with danios or red-tailed rasboras?

What is the size of your tank to accommodate those creatures you mentioned?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
yeah, thanks i went to the store yesterday and they said the same thing. Im gonna just get probly 2frogs and two newts with some land for them to stay on.
 

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joeshmoe said:
think you can put crab if want
I wouldn't. Not with the frogs and newts in the tank.
Crabs can be aggressive and their claws will only harm the other inhabitants. The same thing will apply to crayfish.
 

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I agree with Blue. Besides, fiddler crabs need brackish water, and the only amphibian I know of that can tolerate brackish water is the Fowler's toad. Wouldn't be too good for your newts or frogs.
 

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I'd nix the crab idea, and the fish idea too. African clawed frogs get very large, about the size of a softball. They are very dirty and grow fast, and will eat anything that fits into their mouths. Watch the newts when the frogs get large, and keep up with frequent water exchanges. Adding a submersible filter will help.
The other thing that should be considered is that newts and frogs are both tropical, thus should have a heater, too. Mid 70's is best for them. Newts will need land and water, and tend to spend about equal amounts of time in them. Be sure the tank is well sealed, as newts are wonderful escape artists, and if they get out, they dry up quick, thus they die. African clawed frogs also tend to jump and climb, so well covered with these guys is a must unless the tank is extremely tall.
 

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ACFs are vicious. However, the dwarf clawed frogs stay small and are very peaceful.
 

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I agree with post a few up. I keep many species of frogs and toads, and used to keep newts. It is best to never mix fish, newts and/or frogs. Frogs and toads, even newts and salamanders, all carry different types of toxins in their skin. Not toxic to you and I, in most cases, but with other species. This is their defense mechanism in the wild.
Fish can also carry parasitic nematodes that can cross over into frogs and newts, infecting them and eventually killing them.
I hope my reply helps. :)
 

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Many of the species of amphibian with toxins in the skin are not toxic in captivity. Most of those toxins come from the natural diet that these animals eat in their natural habitat.
I do agree that mixing them is not smart, as most are cannibalistic, too.
 

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This is not to say that frogs don't carry stronger toxins when in the wild...especially frogs like dendrobatids. However, this is not to say that simply because a frog now lives in your vivarium, it becomes a "non-toxic frog", especially when mixed with other species. One of these days, I'll learn to stay out of these forums...geez
 

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AthenianGoddess said:
One of these days, I'll learn to stay out of these forums...geez
Why?:) We're glad to welcome you here.:wave:

Welcome aboard!:wave: :mrgreen:
 

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The dart frogs are a good example of what I was referring to. In the wild, they are toxic... due to their diet. In captivity, they are non toxic... due to change in diet. The toxin in the wild dart frogs comes from ants that they feed on, if I remember correctly. I'll have to look it up, but I do remember that the species of insect they feed on in the wild is where the toxin comes from.
 

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Although this thread is somewhat older, I thought I'd post to reaffirm the previous poster in some important knowledge.

It is absolutely true that some animals get their toxins from their diet in the wild and, therefore, lose their toxicity in captivity. Poison dart frogs are the perfect example of this because, as the previous poster mentioned, they eats toxic ants and then metabolize and concentrate that poison thru their skin pores.

That said, it is dangerous to assume that an animal that is toxic in the wild is not toxic in capitivity without taking certain precautions. First, get to know the animal in question. (Hello, my name is..... errr.... I mean educate yourself abou the animal!) Second, determine if your source for your pets is using wild or captive bred stock. Third, ask what the animal has been fed and about its environmental housing conditions.

This should, under most conditions, allow you to determine if it is possible to purchase a captive-bred version of an otherwise toxic wild animal. If so, and if that animal has been fed and housed in conditions that would keep it from producing its toxins (assuming that it is the sort of animal that requires certain conditions for toxin production), then you are likely in much better shape. However, whenever mixing species, YMMV....

All the best....
 
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