Tropical Fish Keeping banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've recently set up a tank again after about 30 years and I'm having problems.

I started off by buying some zebra danios which were recommended by my aquarium shop

Since having them my one danio is lying on the substrate barely moving, 2 are swimming quite well but near the bottom of the tank and tend to be hanging around by the onevthats not moving and one keeps swimming to the top as if trying to get air.

I have a temperature of 27 degrees C, I have oxygenating plants and an air pump so I don't think kts lack of oxygen or temperature issues

I've also noticed that the one barely moving has a red line by its gills.

Water was tested by the aquarium shop before purchasing fish and all was fine

Any help is appreciated thanks

Sent from my SM-A515F using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
THE TEMP IS TO HIGH FOR DANIOS! Turn down the temp to 78 at the most I reccomend the temp being only 75-76 your poor fish are boiling and struggling to stay alive in that hot water! If they are still like this when you turn the temp down they probably also have a disease.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Do you have a filter?
It sounds like you also haven't cycled the tank before adding the fish. If you don't know what cycling a fish tank is, you can read about it here: How to cycle a tropical fish tank

Basically, to keep the fish from being poisoned by their own waste you rely on beneficial bacteria that gradually build up a colony in the filter media to take toxic fish waste and turn it into less toxic forms. Fish poop, urinate, and breathe out highly toxic Ammonia. Beneficial bacteria in the filter turn that into less toxic Nitrite, and from there into even less toxic Nitrate that can then be removed by you with weekly water changes. This process is known as the Nitrogen Cycle, but most people just call it Cycle in the aquarium hobby. But you don't have enough of a bacteria population in the filter to break down wastes and turn them into less toxic forms right now, so the fish are literally being poisoned by their own waste. Gill burns and damage is a common effect of Ammonia poisoning, that's likely what you are seeing with the gills. It can also burn scales, fins, and damage internal organs. Fish can die from being added to a tank that hasn't yet been cycled. Since the fish are continually putting out waste in your water, you'll need to get test kits to see what is happening in your tank right now. Your water may have been fine before adding the fish, but not after the fish started putting waste into it. Pet stores sell test kits, API makes good ones. Ammonia is toxic at 0.25 ppm or higher, Nitrite at 0.50 ppm or higher. Nitrates can cause problems at 40 ppm or higher.

Honestly, the fish would have the best chance of survival if you simply returned them to the store and started a fishless cycle for 4 weeks before putting in fish. But there are things you can do to try and get the fish through this period.

First, make sure you have a good filter. You should do daily 40% water changes and gravel vacuumings to dilute some of the toxins in the water, and you should use Prime as your dechlorinator for that because Prime detoxifies Ammonia for 24 hours, so that way you are both diluting the amount of toxins and detoxifying those that remain at the same time. It usually takes 4 weeks to cycle, so you are going to be doing daily water changes for awhile. You can go down to weekly routine water changes once your water changes once the Ammonia and Nitrites spike in level and then stay consistently at 0 ppm. There are now products on the market that can add some beneficial bacteria into the aquarium, although not enough to instantly cycle the tank (despite their claims). In my experience, products like Tetra Safestart can knock 1 week off of a 4 week total cycling time. You didn't say how many plants you have, but they will also consume some nitrogenous wastes and improve water quality. Java Fern is an extremely hardy plant that can help. It should be tied to decor with cotton thread rather than buried. Of course, any dead parts of plants will hurt water quality, so plants will only work well if you make sure to remove any dead parts and keep them healthy and trimmed. Zebra Danios are hardy fish, so if you try to keep up on improving the water quality and doing water changes they may survive. While it isn't what is hurting your fish now, your Zebra Danios will do better and have a slightly longer total lifespan if the temperature is dropped - their temperature range is 20 to 25 degrees. Personally I would keep it closer to 25 during the cycle though, because tanks tend to cycle a bit faster at warmer temperatures. So for a cycling period the upper part of a preferred range would work well. You can later choose to go anywhere between that 20 to 25 degrees depending on the needs of the rest of the livestock/plants.

Once the month has gone by and your nitrogenous waste levels have stabilized, you may consider getting more fish. But you should remember that the beneficial bacteria colony will only be big enough to take care of the current fish load. So make sure you add new fish gradually, 1-3 fish at a time and then wait a few days for the aquarium's ecosystem to adjust to the new fish load. Zebra Danios can fin nip and bully excessively when kept in groups of less than 8. So after your tank has cycled and stabilized you might consider adding to your shoal. Zebra Danios, Leopard Danios, and Glofish Danios are all the same species, Danio rerio, so you can add up to a total of 8 with a mix of different colors and patterns as like as they are all labeled by that scientific name.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks.
Yeah I left the tank to "cycle" (wasn't sure what it was called)
I left it for about 3 weeks and took the water to my local aquarium shop to be tested who then told me it was fine to put fish in.

I was told on a Facebook group that the amonia levels could return though after adding fish due to the waste thats now in the water.

I'm taking a sample to a different aquarium shop tomorrow morning fir testing and I have ordered a testing kit for the amonia and one for nitrates and nitrites.

I'm also going to do a 50 / 50 water change tomorrow.

I have a submersible filter and an air pump plus oxygenating plants.

2 of the 3 fish seem to be fine and also the one that wasn't moving came out of hiding and started swimming around about an hour ago so im wondering if it could be stress related from changing environments.

This is the fish in question, hard to get a picture due to wheres its lying


Sent from my SM-A515F using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Unfortunately my fish has just died.

I'm hoping I can prevent any more casualties so getting up early tomorrow and going to get water tested and go from there

Sent from my SM-A515F using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Well after all my issues and losing a fish I have had a water test done by another shop.

The amonia levels are very low and nitrites and nitrates are 0..(I think I have that correct)

I also decided to have a bid on a tank on ebay as an upgrade and better environment for the fish...oops...it was bigger than I thought as im crap with metric measurements.

I'm now the proud owner of a 95 litre tank which I'm going to set up and cycle whilst keeping the hexagonal tank up and running til it's ready.


Sent from my SM-A515F using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
I'm sorry about your fish. How are the others behaving now?

That upgrade size will be excellent once you can get a full school of Danios. Once your Zebra Danios are in a larger tank and larger shoal they should be really active and get a lot of use out of the the longer length of the new tank. They may settle in and become more active once they've had time to get used to their environment.

Some red around the gills can be normal, because underneath the gill plate (operculum) healthy gills actually are red. But you might want to keep an eye out for signs of gill parasites such as gill flukes or fish lice. Fish Lice can be seen with the naked eye if you know what they look like, but gill flukes may not be visible. Signs of gill parasites include excess redness around the gills, the fish rubbing its gills and body against decor a lot in an effort to rub off parasites, the fish producing more mucus/slime coat on the body, rapid breathing, and the fish laying on the bottom or floating at the very top of the tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
THE TEMP IS TO HIGH FOR DANIOS! Turn down the temp to 78 at the most I reccomend the temp being only 75-76 your poor fish are boiling and struggling to stay alive in that hot water! If they are still like this when you turn the temp down they probably also have a disease.
Please stop screaming, this is a family friendly forum. Temp for danios should be at 25-26 Celsius, but I doubt the hot temperature is causing this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
I've recently set up a tank again after about 30 years and I'm having problems.

I started off by buying some zebra danios which were recommended by my aquarium shop

Since having them my one danio is lying on the substrate barely moving, 2 are swimming quite well but near the bottom of the tank and tend to be hanging around by the onevthats not moving and one keeps swimming to the top as if trying to get air.

I have a temperature of 27 degrees C, I have oxygenating plants and an air pump so I don't think kts lack of oxygen or temperature issues

I've also noticed that the one barely moving has a red line by its gills.

Water was tested by the aquarium shop before purchasing fish and all was fine

Any help is appreciated thanks

Sent from my SM-A515F using Tapatalk
‚Water parameters is all good and fine’ does not help us help you. Please do tell us your parameters for ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. Do a large, 75%, water change immediately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Unfortunately all the fish died.
I'm now one week into cycling the new tank and hopefully this will work out OK as I now have the correct advice as to what I'm doing.
Ammonia is at 4.5 at present

Sent from my SM-A515F using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
I’m sorry to hear about the fish..

You will not be getting any bacteria with ammonia that high. Do an 80% water change and test water again a day later, if still not below 4ppm, do another and test water day later again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I’m sorry to hear about the fish..

You will not be getting any bacteria with ammonia that high. Do an 80% water change and test water again a day later, if still not below 4ppm, do another and test water day later again.
Thank you
Will do that but will have to wait until Thursday unfortunately as I have a funeral to attend tomorrow.

Thanks again .

Sent from my SM-A515F using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Second water change done today and it looks loads better.


Sent from my SM-A515F using Tapatalk
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top