Tropical Fish Keeping banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There is a creek behind my house that runs around the neighborhood, and me and my friends often go out there to hang out as theres benches, no one around, and just pretty peaceful.

However, thats where my problem comes in, its TOO peaceful. Kinda boring sometimes. Ive seen some tadpoles down there, occasionally some bigger fish (for a small creek atleast), and once even a turtle (highlight of my year right there....), but it still kinda sucks. Does anyone have any ideas as to how i can create some form of life, preferably fish, down there? Or are creeks just lost causes for lots of fish.

Some things to keep in mind, I live in Texas, so account for the weather if needed. And I really have no idea what there is for fish to eat down there. I really know nothing about fish, but I do think itd be cool to see some life down there and say I atleast helped in making it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,139 Posts
There is a creek behind my house that runs around the neighborhood, and me and my friends often go out there to hang out as theres benches, no one around, and just pretty peaceful.

However, thats where my problem comes in, its TOO peaceful. Kinda boring sometimes. Ive seen some tadpoles down there, occasionally some bigger fish (for a small creek atleast), and once even a turtle (highlight of my year right there....), but it still kinda sucks. Does anyone have any ideas as to how i can create some form of life, preferably fish, down there? Or are creeks just lost causes for lots of fish.

Some things to keep in mind, I live in Texas, so account for the weather if needed. And I really have no idea what there is for fish to eat down there. I really know nothing about fish, but I do think itd be cool to see some life down there and say I atleast helped in making it.
Much depends on what enters the creek in the way of pollutant's. If the water is subject to runoff from agricultural fertilizers, animal waste,household waste,the conditions may not be favorable for much in the way of aquatic life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
It all depends on water quality, if there are not fish in it now it is most likely hopeless....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,255 Posts
I think introducing non-native fish to the wild in general is just a bad idea regardless of the environment... if you find fish down the creek and move them up it might be ok, but adding just any fish that will survive may negatively impact other parts of the ecosystem balance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
There is probably a government department that deals with public waterways and wildlife issues. It there is anything you can do, it would only be under the direction of the relevant authority. Otherwise, you shouldn't interfere with a natural ecosystem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Where I live in Australia, it's illegal to introduce fish into waterways. And some plants. So check your laws.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,139 Posts
Nothing wrong with stocking native fish to streams or ponds in my view. I have stocked ponds and lakes for Farmers,and Preppy Suburbanites with native fishes I have caught from streams and rivers for some time.
Conservation Dept, also does this here in Missouri if you call and ask them to. They will stock the pond or lake BUT owner must then allow those who ask ,,,permission to fish the pond/lake .Or ,,,you can purchase fish through the Dept and they will deliver them, usually in the spring for a price.
Streams are what they are,fish will go with the flow. If favorable conditions and food is available, they will be there, If not,,they won't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
another thing is that maybe there arent any fish in that particular stretch. Go upstream or downstream for a good distance, you should find a stretch that has fish
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
you might even decide to dam it to make a mini lake. Personally I woulden't try to stock it even if you own it. Before you stock it test the water first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
e mail the dnr

Your Department of natural resources or whatever they are called in Texas would be a valuable source for what is known to be in the stream. They keep records and do searches themselves. A letter or e mail with the specific location will surely get a response.

If you do not see much in the way of aquatic life there can be many reasons. Water quality...dissolved oxygen...water temp...seasonal flow

Is it a year round running stream? Where does it flow from? Where does it flow to? I have a river behind my home but there are only minnows and no larger game fish as the river has a waterfall at the discharge end so no fish come from downstream and there is a large lake upstream so the fish stay in the lake or if someone put fish in the river they would find their way to the lake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
(I'm new here, so take my advice with a grain of salt)

If I was going to go about this, this is what I would do (other's ideas so far that I enjoyed are combined in to this):

1) Take a test of water quality. See what the temperature and pH of the water is. You may also want to test water hardness, etc.

2) You are going about this wrong. You need to change your way of thinking. You said you occasionally see life there. Well, what that means to me is that life occasionally passes by. Instead of introducing more life, what you want to try to do is create an environment that life wants to stay in. Make a mini-dam, like that one guy said, or dig a shallow pool in the stream. Plant some aquatic plants in it. Once the plants are established, introduce some daphnia or other native aquatic equivalent. That is assuming they don't already show up.

Over the course of a few years, you will have a small ecosystem. You'll find that at the very least a toad or two will have moved in. And you can probably introduce native species to your river pool with little issue.

As a side note, if you do decide to create a pool, think carefully about your entrance and exit. Try to create calm areas for the plants and microbey-things. For example, if you have a straight stream, and you dig a hole just on one side of it, you will create a whirlpool. I think your best bet might be to do something like this:



Uploaded with ImageShack.us
This is all assuming that the pool is as deep as the stream, if you make it deeper, it will be calmer and have less eddies. Also plants will help calm it down, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
A stream...any stream is a wetland. It is against federal law to dig in a wetland without a permit from the Army Corp of Engineers. Its one thing to dig a farm pond on dry "upland". Its another entirely to dig a pond on a wetland stream. When the neighbors down stream see silted dirty water flowing by you best be prepared for a visit from the feds or your state wildlife agency. Fines are horriffic. I didn't know does not get you a pass. If you want to dig, build a dam or berm, re-route the stream...anything...be sure you contact the army corp first and ask if a permit is necessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Good idea wh2o
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top