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I am new to this aquarium world and am having trouble getting my aquarium to lower the Ph. Reads higher than it should and have tried using chemical lowing agents with no luck. I know my fish are suffering a little and want to get it where it needs to be. I have also tried driftwood. I have yet to try peat moss as I am concerned I will do it incorrectly or use too much, any help would be appreciated!
 

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What are the numbers you’re getting and where are you wishing to take it?


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high carbon dioxide lowers pH.


If you have high pH I would do nothing. I'm not aware of any fish the surer in any way because the co2 is low and therefore the ph is high.




my .02
 

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high carbon dioxide lowers pH.


If you have high pH I would do nothing. I'm not aware of any fish the surer in any way because the co2 is low and therefore the ph is high.




my .02

geesh


If you have high pH I would do nothing. I'm not aware of any fish 'that suffer' in any way because the co2 is low and therefore the ph is high.
 

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I know people who keep discus that work very hard to keep their pH low....


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Nope. The tannin/pH effect is thru out the whole wood. Parasites and other hazards are normally at the surface areas and are killed by boiling
 

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I always thought driftwood raised the pH not lowered it...?

From my own experience with high pH, the moment I removed the driftwood my ph dropped & I was able to maintain my tank at neutral.

Months later I decided the tank looked empty without the driftwood so I coated the entire same piece of driftwood in silicone & put it back into the tank. The silicone coat stopped the wood from leaching & I'm still getting constant neutral readings.
 

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I always thought driftwood raised the pH not lowered it...?

From my own experience with high pH, the moment I removed the driftwood my ph dropped & I was able to maintain my tank at neutral.

Months later I decided the tank looked empty without the driftwood so I coated the entire same piece of driftwood in silicone & put it back into the tank. The silicone coat stopped the wood from leaching & I'm still getting constant neutral readings.

Perhaps different types of wood?
https://health.onehowto.com/article/how-to-lower-ph-levels-in-water-naturally-7649.html
 

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Unless you are keeping highly sensitive fish that were raised in a drastically different pH, I won't mess with it. Chemical manipulation is risky due to the fluctuations. Adding driftwood is fine and long as it's aquarium safe. Peat moss works well, but again don't mess with the pH unless you have to. Most fish have no issues with "unnatural" pH levels as long as they're stable. I have South American cichlids, including rams, that are happy in my taps' high pH and hardness. Stable water quality should be your main goal :)
 
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