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Discussion Starter #1
The ammonia is at 5.0 or 6.0ppm up from 2.0ppm a couple days ago. nitrates at 0ppm. Tank is 3 weeks old but had to do some water changes and in treatments :/. It's a 10 gallon with 2 platties and adf. I added ammo lock a couple days ago when it read 2.0. Should I add more or is it too much?
 

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First off, welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum.

Cycling a new tank can take anywhere up to 8 weeks normally. It varies from tank to tank due to a number of biological factors.

With live fish in the tank, ammonia and nitrite must not be allowed to rise above zero or the fish will be affected. The ammo-lock should deal with ammonia; it does this by changing it from ammonia to ammonium which is not toxic to fish. Ammonium will read as "ammonia" with our test kits. Obviously this is what is occurring, otherwise with a reading of 5 or 6 ppm, or even 2 ppm, the fish would be dead.

At this stage, since the nitrite spike will be next, I would add some floating plants. These work by taking up a lot of ammonia, faster than bacteria can, and the tank will therefore "cycle" silently, which means in such low amounts that you will not detect them. But more importantly, the fish will be protected. Water Sprite is ideal for this, but many of the stem plants also work well left floating.

Another method is to do daily 50% water changes, and use a conditioner like Prime or Ultimate that detoxify ammonia and nitrite.

Byron.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ammonia levels won't drop

It is constantly testing in the high 8.0 range. It's a 10 gallon tank with 2 platties and a adf. I have a filter running but I changed out the carbon filter after treatment for ick. The tank is 3 weeks old, with new sand gravel and the carbon filter is 6 days running.

It has been testing in the high 8 range for the last 7 days and I have been dosing with ammo lock every 2 days and I have done 2 25% water changes since then. Nitrate and nitrite remain at 0.
 

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It is constantly testing in the high 8.0 range. It's a 10 gallon tank with 2 platties and a adf. I have a filter running but I changed out the carbon filter after treatment for ick. The tank is 3 weeks old, with new sand gravel and the carbon filter is 6 days running.

It has been testing in the high 8 range for the last 7 days and I have been dosing with ammo lock every 2 days and I have done 2 25% water changes since then. Nitrate and nitrite remain at 0.
This is the initial cycle occurring. The ammo deals with ammonia by changing it to ammonium which is basically harmless. If this wasn't happening, the ammonia (which is highly toxic) would have killed the fish.

The nitrite will be next. Again, get some floating plants. My previous advice stands.

Byron.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)

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Is this normal? The filter was put in a week ago after ending ich treatment. It was white now it is filthy. The tank is still in the early stages of establishing. Should I put a new filter in or is the filter supposed to get like this?

https://www.dropbox.com/s/6natdqozjj2ng5a/Photo Apr 26, 7 45 05 AM.jpg

https://www.dropbox.com/s/yav41ia17flrbyc/Photo Apr 26, 7 45 13 AM.jpg

Also how often should I be changing the filter out anyway? Once the tank is established.
Nothing unusual in the photos. The filter media is intended to trap detritus, and it seems to be doing that. I would rinse this at every weekly water change. As this is a new tank, rinse it in a pail of tank water. Swish it around. This will remove the particulate matter, allowing the water to better pass through the media pad, but not destroy the bacteria therein. The media does not need to be changed as long as it is still functioning, meaning the water is still flowing through it as it should. If the pad becomes so worn the water can pass around it and not through it, replace it.
 

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It is constantly testing in the high 8.0 range. It's a 10 gallon tank with 2 platties and a adf. I have a filter running but I changed out the carbon filter after treatment for ick. The tank is 3 weeks old, with new sand gravel and the carbon filter is 6 days running.

It has been testing in the high 8 range for the last 7 days and I have been dosing with ammo lock every 2 days and I have done 2 25% water changes since then. Nitrate and nitrite remain at 0.
What kind of testing kit are you using and are you testing correctly? Their is no way any fish or frog would be alive with ammonia levels that high.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I am using the API master test kit. It is a test tube liquid test. I am testing per directions, and dosing with ammo lock every 2 days and I already did 2 25% water changes in 7 days. I am feeling like I should do another and even after the water change the ammonia stays over 8.0. Trites and trates remain at 0
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The fish aren't really showing signs of distress except the 2 platties are lingering at the top of the tank behind the HOB filter. The frog hiding on the bottom as usually, but still is active.
 

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Do you have ammonia coming out the tap? That high of a reading is not normal. Are you over feeding? Could there possibly be a dead fish in the tank? The ammo lock is obviously keeping them alive. Sorry for all the questions but I've never seen anyone with a 8.0 ammonia reading
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There are no dead fish. I haven't tested tap for ammonia but I been using tap since setting up the tank and readings were always 0 to 2.0. I have not been feeding much, very sparingly once a day. Just half a pinch if even. Should I do a 50% water change? Can too may water changes hurt the fish or the nitro cycle?
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It may delay it but when you have ammonia readings you must do water changes. If this we're me, I'd prepare for the worst with the remaining fish and frog. Try and figure out the issue and start fresh with live plants, I know Byron has already mentioned this in the thread. Maybe someone else could suggest something but I hope for the best for you and the fish and adf
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Discussion Starter #13
Hmmm something is not right. I did a 50% water change and ammonia still read at 8.0.
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Hmmm something is not right. I did a 50% water change and ammonia still read at 8.0.
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First, test the tap water on its own for ammonia. Let's dismiss this as a possible source, or not as the case may be.

Second, earlier there was mention of treatments for ich. It is common to have faulty readings, or to have ammonia or nitrite rise, due to the mix of various chemicals such as medications, water conditioners, additives, etc. [Another reason why the less stuff we put in the water, the better.] I don't have the knowledge to sort all this out, but it does occur and needs to be kept in mind.

Third, as long as Prime is being used with each water change, the ammonia is ammonium which is harmless to the fish. And any nitrite will be rendered safe as well. Both will still show in tests, so don't worry over that with Prime. Prime is effective for up to 48 hours, which is why we suggest frequent water changes, every other day should work fine, until these numbers are zero.

Byron.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
First, test the tap water on its own for ammonia. Let's dismiss this as a possible source, or not as the case may be.

Second, earlier there was mention of treatments for ich. It is common to have faulty readings, or to have ammonia or nitrite rise, due to the mix of various chemicals such as medications, water conditioners, additives, etc. [Another reason why the less stuff we put in the water, the better.] I don't have the knowledge to sort all this out, but it does occur and needs to be kept in mind.

Third, as long as Prime is being used with each water change, the ammonia is ammonium which is harmless to the fish. And any nitrite will be rendered safe as well. Both will still show in tests, so don't worry over that with Prime. Prime is effective for up to 48 hours, which is why we suggest frequent water changes, every other day should work fine, until these numbers are zero.

Byron.
What do you mean by prime? The ammonia still reads 8.0 but the fish don't seem stressed. I had to change the filter because water was flowing around it not through it and it had only been in there for a week.
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Prime and ammo loc are similar in regards to their action with the ammonia... this is what is keeping your fish alive assuming that the readings of 8 are correct.

I didn't see the results of your tap water test. It should come up very low in ammonia.

daily 50% water changes at this point until the ammonia is zero and then continue them until the nitrites also drop to zero... they will spike at some point and this indicates that your cycle is nearing completion.

I don't have the time to look right now but does ammo loc look after nitrites as well as ammonia? It would be a shame if it didn't and the nitrite killed the fish and frog. If it doesn't, get some Seachem's Prime as it detoxifies ammonia, nitrite and nitrate as well as treating the chlorine in the water.

Jeff.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks that prime sounds good i will look into it. The ammonia reading on tap water was .2 to .5. Ammo lock only says ammonia not the nitrites
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Thanks that prime sounds good i will look into it. The ammonia reading on tap water was .2 to .5. Ammo lock only says ammonia not the nitrites
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Prime is a favourite and works well.

That reading is a little high but certainly not the source of your extremely high tank water. I'd just keep doing large water changes, 50% minimum daily until it comes down. As much as it is a problem keeping up with the water treatments will keep everyone alive until this finishes.

Jeff
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