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bio-balls are ok for FO and FOWLR but no good for corals as they create too much nitrate, skimmers, powerheads, rock and sand are used for corals. This i think is called the berlin method (which surprisingly was created in berlin :eek: )
 

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say what. bio balls are almost found in all reef tanks that i have seen. Even in refugiums there are still a few. If this is wrong i would like to know. I will need to do something different. But in my sump the water level is on bottom of the bio balls acording to the sticker and that was a pro clear system.
 

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Andre said:
say what. bio balls are almost found in all reef tanks that i have seen. Even in refugiums there are still a few. If this is wrong i would like to know. I will need to do something different. But in my sump the water level is on bottom of the bio balls acording to the sticker and that was a pro clear system.
well i would agree but usmc mike told me they were no good, ask him for the reason why
 

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no it makes sense but why do so many use them. My next question is i want to convert my tank wet/dry pro clear aquatics system into a refugium. Who makes a good refugium, skimmer, light combo?
 

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why dont you make your own and save some money, just buy a tank that will fit under your main tank, some plexi-glass aquarium dividers, some silicone, and you should be good to go. (still need a water pump, drill/overflow box etc) also get a clip on MH light for the refugium.
 

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im the kind of guy that would rather spend the money and get a sump perfect size, maped flow rate, and matching pumps. Now i am an engineer but that is a whole lot of thinking when you can get one for like 200. Even though people make there own it is a science in its own to get it properly tuned or at least that is what i have been led to believe.
 

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OK lets start with the bio-balls. I have never seen seem used on reef tanks. They are no good, unless you keep cleaning them of all the depris they collect, if not all they do is produce nitrates. Now for the water in the sump. I have 3 sections in a 30 gallon long tank. One is for the refug, the middle section is for the skimmer and the third is for the clean water waiting to be returned to the main tank. Each one of my sections is cut shorter then the next. so I have no set water level the only part that gets low is the third. Another way to figure it out is. If you have a hole drilled in your return line (1/16" below water line) the best way is unplug the return pump and see were the water stops in the sump.if its to high remove water, if its to low add water.
 

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Bio balls are 2 decades ago thinking. It has been proven that they go neglected to long.

OK I've never seen a "mapped and flow rated" sump before. there are several manufacturers, I think triggerfish systems builds the nicest. However none come with a return pump nor have I ever seen one come with a mention of what pump to use. Your pump is the only thing that sets the speed. Most sumps are set for between 4-6" of water in the skimmer chamber and about 10" in the fuge. The important things to keep in mind are that skimmers need different depths int eh sump chamber to work correctly and that you have enough extra space in a power failure.
 

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well i was reading about them and they came with the exact flow rates that should be used, exact bio sediment, blaw blaw, if that is not true than i will just make one if it really doesn't matter. I was just left to believe it mattered. Thanks for all the help usmc, you are very knowledgable.
 

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As what CRM stated the return pump determaines the flow rate. THe overflow box or reef ready tank can only go as fast or slow as the pump is allowing it.
 

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exactly, i am just trying to figure what is all wrong with my setup. my local fish store in northern minnesota only knows so much, it is not like you goes to continuing education for it. So i am running a mag drive 12 with a around 1050 gph so i am just going to assume after looking at all these posts that is wrong. I am assuming my uv sterilizer is not designed for a total flow rate like that. That is why i have algae all the time i am sure. So, sump. How many gallons, how much bio sediment, by the way is KENTS bio sediment pretty good or is there a better. So I should also put a sump skimmer in to get rid of my external one. So that means i have a bunch of extra parts.
 

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Andre start a new thread. It'll be easier to answer your questions seperately from these.

A basic idea is about 5 times the tank volume for your return pump. UV sterilezers work best at as slow a speed as possible. It is ver possible to continue using your pump but put in a recycle tee so that you slow your tank exchange. Also you can tee of from the main return to power your UV sterilizer. Generally 300gph or less is best for sterilizers.
 
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