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I used 250 watts Sera.:)
 

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I have a 55 gallon and alot of people suggested to go with 2 heaters, one on each side for a more even heat throughout the tank.

HTH,

Barb
 

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Firefighter337 said:
75 gallon tank.
I use a Rena-Cal Top Light Excel 300w heater in my 75 gallon FW community tank.

2.5 to 5 watts per gallon is a good rule of thumb when selecting a heater. The lower wattage heater if the room temperature does not fluctuate more than 10 degrees fahrenheit. It it fluctuates more than that, then I would go with a higher wattage heater.

Another good idea is to purchase two heaters. One as a back-up that you can install if something goes wrong with the other heater.

I learned a valuable lesson years ago when I had a heater fail over a holiday and nothing was open to purchase a new heater.
 

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As I am a very new to aquariums and have yet to purchase my first (still planning it out), I would also like some advice on a heater setup. With this post only being a few weeks old, I hope it is OK to bump this thread to the top again.

dakotagirl mentioned above that she was given the suggestion of 2 heaters, one on each end of a 55 gal tank. I too am planning a 55 gal (long) and was wondering about this just yesterday. Would it be better to have 2 heaters?

I know that it would add to the cost of the setup, but my thought was to have (2) 300 watt heaters in the tank. If one were to go bad, the other should be able to keep up with the demand until a new second one could be purchased and installed. But that brings up another question. How would I know if one were to go bad? :squint:

Thanks for any advice you can give!
 

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I would use a 300 watt as there is no price diff between that and 250watt and it would cope a little easier...It would also depend on where you stay, if you lived where I do you would probably need two heaters as the temp at night is very cold at the moment and one heater struggles on a large tank
 

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Thanks for the reply!

Where I am located is cold. Night before last it was about 15F/-9C here. However, I have a natural gas furnace and central air (in warmer months) which keeps the air temperature where I intend to place my aquarium at about 74F/23C. Granted, either of the two systems (heat/ac) could go out at any time.

Regards,
Dave
 

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IMHO the two heater concept is good and is what I employ.

The only drawback to the two heater concept is that two thermostats are also employed which implies twice the probability of a thermostat sticking and overheating the aquarium.

It has been my experience that this probability is minimal compared to a heater failure.

I employ Pro Heat heaters and the following link provides information concerning wattage, temperature and tank capacity.
http://www.marinedepot.com/aquarium_heaters_won_brothers_pro-heat_titanium.asp?CartId=

Please note that 78F is 26C.
The following link is a fahrenheit to celsius converter.
http://www.wbuf.noaa.gov/tempfc.htm

In wet/dry filtration the heaters and thermostats are typically placed in the sump.

If you have another type of filtration the heaters are typically placed remote from each other in the tank and vertically separated from the filtration intake.

TR
 

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jones57742 said:
IMHO the two heater concept is good and is what I employ.

The only drawback to the two heater concept is that two thermostats are also employed which implies twice the probability of a thermostat sticking and overheating the aquarium.

It has been my experience that this probability is minimal compared to a heater failure.

I employ Pro Heat heaters and the following link provides information concerning wattage, temperature and tank capacity.
http://www.marinedepot.com/aquarium_heaters_won_brothers_pro-heat_titanium.asp?CartId=

Please note that 78F is 26C.
The following link is a fahrenheit to celsius converter.
http://www.wbuf.noaa.gov/tempfc.htm

In wet/dry filtration the heaters and thermostats are typically placed in the sump.

If you have another type of filtration the heaters are typically placed remote from each other in the tank and vertically separated from the filtration intake.

TR
Thanks for your input! I think I will start out with a single unit to help reduce the initial cost and then possibly add a second unit later. Was just thinking of having it set 1 or 2 degrees cooler than the first in case the one fails. I am one of those that tends to err on the side of caution and having a backup already in place will make me feel a bit better.

Regards,
Dave
 

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but if you use two weak heaters, when it gets stuck it will take much longer for it to overheat your tank giving you enough time to find out whats wrong. I would go with getting two 150 watt heaters
 

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The only time I have seen two heaters used is when you have a lot of plants in the tank or it is divided some way. If you have a lot of plants then I would use 2 heaters, if not then one with descent circulation is plenty.

The quality of the heater always has a little to do with it and I would recommend getting one with an automatic high temp shut off to help prevent deadly overheating.

Reading the other posts, I don't know if this even matters anymore but it recommended to have 5 watts of heater per gallon. Remeber that doesn't mean a 100 gallon has to have a 500 watt heater because after you calculate for substrate and other reductions, rerely does a finished tank make it to 90% of the original size in actual water volume.

Just make sure you have good circulation and one good heater should be plenty.
 
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