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I have two tanks, one is cycling and one is a 5 gal (Soon to be upgraded)
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Have you separated the turtles from their main tank? I heard it can spread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No I don’t know what it is so I didn’t separate them as if I don’t know what it is I can’t be sure it spreads
 

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I have two tanks, one is cycling and one is a 5 gal (Soon to be upgraded)
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252 Posts
Since you don't know if it will spread the first step is to probably separate them.
 

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7 aquaria: live plants, shrimp, snails, celestial danios, white clouds, corys, ottos...
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Since you don't know if it will spread the first step is to probably separate them.
As a first step, yes, definitely separate them. This is good practice any time you have something going on. Separating them helps keep it from spreading to the others and often helps the infected animal recover by removing competition and stress.

You have two problems, one is a very high priority (the white spots) and the other is a slow-motion problem/solution (pyramiding of the scutes)

Based on what you are saying, were they mine, I would separate them immediately and temporarily provide a little aquarium salt in the water of both. The salt may help discourage any bacterial growth. If the spots are still present (11 days after the original post) and/or have spread or otherwise gotten worse, a vet visit is in order.

The pyramiding of the shell is usually a symptom of poor nutrition over a long period of time (multiple sheds). You cannot correct what has already happened, but you can take steps to provide proper husbandry to keep it from getting worse. Excess protein and/or insufficient calcium are leading causes. The white spot could also be a sign of nutritional deficiencies/husbandry issues leading to vulnerability to infection.

Revisit your husbandry requirements and provisions:
Sufficient UV-B source and dry basking area?
Water temperatures correct for the species?
Correct dietary combinations?* (not yet, or there would not be pyramiding)
Sufficient calcium supplement?

First, what species of turtle are these and where did they come from? The species is important from a dietary/environmental point of view.

Then, your pictures are of very little use, They are way to blurry to see anything. They look like Red Ear Sliders, but honestly, the pics are so difficult to see that one cannot even tell what kind of turtle they are, let alone diagnose a spot. If you want help with the white spots, we need to be able to SEE them. Perhaps you are trying to take pictures that are too close for your camera to be able to focus. Please try to get decently focused pics of the white spots and surrounding areas. Maybe you need to back off with the camera far enough that it can crisply focus and then just let us magnify the pics as required.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
They are red eared sliders I got them from backwater reptiles about a year ago I do have some silver something cream for treating shell Rot (I Got it from a Previous vet trip
 

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7 aquaria: live plants, shrimp, snails, celestial danios, white clouds, corys, ottos...
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Treatment is good, IF 'shell rot' is really what's going on.

If it IS shell rot, there are other things that cause or promote this condition that need to be fixed. There are several other steps you could and should take to reduce the chances of this occurring and/or getting worse. Water cleanliness and proper temps are one area of particular concern. Another is physical injuries that open a port for the bacterial infection, injury that can result from the turtles fighting or competing for food, or from sharp objects in the tank.

Here is a very good article on 'shell rot':Turtle Shell Rot: Symptoms, Causes & Treatments

Good luck with your turtles!
 
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