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Hello, I am currently doing a fishless cycle on a 10 gallon fish tank. On the first day, I added ammonia. I tested and it was AT 8PPM. I waited a couple of days, and it stayed the same. I kept doing water changes, but it wouldn't drop. Now I am 3 weeks into the cycle, and the Ammonia is still at 8PPM:|

Thanks,
Omar
 

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Unless there is ammonia in your tapwater, water changes will decrease your ammonia concentration. I would change 50-75% of the tanks volume everyday till you are at 4 ppm or lower. Also check your tapwater ph. If ph is below 6.5 or so you might have a hard time starting your cycle. As soon as nitrifying bacteria colonze your tank, your ammonia should fall quickly.
Good luck!
 

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Tapwater ammonia at 2 ppm is no good! You'll need to dose prime with every water change, but for cycling it should be ok. Can't think why your ammonia would remain at 8 after several water changes even with 2ppm ammonia tapwater. Make sure to test your tap pH, might be the root of your problem.
Just out of curiosity,.where are you located? City or well water?
Thanks for bringing this to the forum!
 

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What are you testing the water with, specifically what test kit, liquid or strips? If your tap water is at 2 ppm, I would look into it, that seems very high. Most cities have their water standards on line, 2 ppm just seems unsafe to me. Personally I would do a 100% water change, test the water and then only add enough ammonia to bring the level to 4-5.
 

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I would not change 100% water if your ammonia is down to 4 ppm. Just my opinion. Your pH is fine and most florida water is good for alkalinity and hardness. In.a.normal cycle you should see.ammonia dropping and nitrite starting to appear. After that, nitrite and ammonia will fall to minimal levels and nitrate will start to show up. Please keep us updated as I am very interested to see what happens next.
Thanks and good luck!
 

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Biomature is basically ammonia with the trace elements that are beneficial to the growth of the bacterial colonies. A normal cycle doesn't stall above 5ppm, I think that is one of those myths that has grown with the internet (of which there are many) in an attempt to find an explanation when something goes wrong. For years I have been cycling with a starting point of ammonia around 10ppm and each one has completed within 4 weeks. I get the ammonia to around 10ppm and let the cycle run its course. I monitor pH and alkalinity but have never had reason to adjust either of those during a cycle (but then I have always tended to live in fairly hard water areas). To keep the Nitrosomonas ticking along I add a weekly dose of ammonia during the course of the cycle.

In fact, the longest cycle I have had was when I started with ammonia at 4ppm. Of course, not saying that the starting level of ammonia was the cause as there are many factors that could have affected it. All the requirements of the cycle have to be kept in balance and these are (presuming there is a day food source available) pH, temp, light, oxygen, micronutrients (trace elements), salinity and toxins.
 

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