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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi guys, new user, looking for some feedback on my plans for my 2nd tank... I can see the hobby quickly becoming an addiction, I only got my first tank last November.

Tank layout plans:
15 Gallon Long (56 Litres)
Tetra Complete Substrate
Black Gravel with a curved black sand section near front bottom right.
Some big rocks and a dwarf hairgrass carpet over the gravel.

Question 1:

Is there some plastic strips I can buy to prevent the hairgrass spreading onto the sand?
Question 2:
Should I place the rocks in the aquarium on some styrofoam padding to ease pressure on glass?
Question 3:
My current tank is only a 6 gallon, can I transfer some water from it during water changes to the new tank to speed up cycle process?

I plan to temporaily use elodea densa in the new tank, it was so good in my 6gallon at preventing algae growth, afterwards I want to add a crop of Vallisneria spiralis to a corner of the aquarium as a hiding spot. Will probably throw in an anubias or two behind the rocks too.

Fish plan:
3x Peppered Cory (hence the sandy section)
5x Celestial Pearl Danio
5x Penguin Tetra
Link

Question 4:
Now what's the best order to add these fish to the tank? And how quickly (will probably depend on my LFS shipping tbh). Apparently they are all classed as easy to care for which is what I want.


Later down the line I will add some Otos, got one rocking my 6G just now would love to have more of these cuties. And possibly some amano shrimp, I feel like the hairgrass will need it's algae growth tended to.

I haven't really picked out a filter yet, want one completely silent, and easy to maintain, love my Fluval Edge filter was thinking of getting a similar waterfall style one, but open to ideas of a good internal filter.

Thanks and hope to hear from you soon!
 

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Hi guys, new user, looking for some feedback on my plans for my 2nd tank... I can see the hobby quickly becoming an addiction, I only got my first tank last November.

Tank layout plans:
15 Gallon Long (56 Litres)
Tetra Complete Substrate
Black Gravel with a curved black sand section near front bottom right.
Some big rocks and a dwarf hairgrass carpet over the gravel.

Question 1:

Is there some plastic strips I can buy to prevent the hairgrass spreading onto the sand?
Question 2:
Should I place the rocks in the aquarium on some styrofoam padding to ease pressure on glass?
Question 3:
My current tank is only a 6 gallon, can I transfer some water from it during water changes to the new tank to speed up cycle process?

I plan to temporaily use elodea densa in the new tank, it was so good in my 6gallon at preventing algae growth, afterwards I want to add a crop of Vallisneria spiralis to a corner of the aquarium as a hiding spot. Will probably throw in an anubias or two behind the rocks too.

Fish plan:
3x Peppered Cory (hence the sandy section)
5x Celestial Pearl Danio
5x Penguin Tetra
Link

Question 4:
Now what's the best order to add these fish to the tank? And how quickly (will probably depend on my LFS shipping tbh). Apparently they are all classed as easy to care for which is what I want.


Later down the line I will add some Otos, got one rocking my 6G just now would love to have more of these cuties. And possibly some amano shrimp, I feel like the hairgrass will need it's algae growth tended to.

I haven't really picked out a filter yet, want one completely silent, and easy to maintain, love my Fluval Edge filter was thinking of getting a similar waterfall style one, but open to ideas of a good internal filter.

Thanks and hope to hear from you soon!


Yes it is easy to start accumulating tanks, especially after I answer question 3.


Answer 1: sounds like you might want to use a plastic strip to keep the sand separate from the gravel too. Some silicone and the right piece of plastic sounds like it’ll work. I don’t have experience with anything other than the silicone. No idea if it’ll stop the plant.

Answer 2: styrofoam floats so I see that causing more problems than it would solve. You’re good to place rocks where you want them. If There is a particular way you want the rocks to stay, then break out the silicone. It’s easy to cut with a knife and clean up so it’s not like you are cementing things into place for ever and ever.

Answer 3: there’s no point to transferring water - everything you need to get your new tank cycled is in the old tanks filter. That’s where the beneficial bacteria lives so transferring filter media from one tank to another bypasses the cycling process. In your case you’re going from small to big so that means you don’t have a big bacteria colony to start with, so what you move over to the new tanks filter isn’t going to be ready right away. In that situation you’re better off moving the media and then dosing the new tank with ammonia to grow the bacteria colony large enough to support your first group of fish before you get the fish. Otherwise, you can just get a fish or two and stock very slowly. Were you moving media from large to small, the media moved from a large well stocked tank might be enough to support a fully stocked smaller tank right away. Not that that’s a good idea - just illustrating the example

Answer 4: I don’t think it matters. I would just add one school of fish at a time and then wait a couple weeks to see if there’s problems before adding new fish.

Answer 5: I would highly recommend a mini canister filter if you want silence and performance. Too , nice that they don’t take up room inside the tank.


Don’t get zucked! Stand up to censorship! Someone else’s voice silenced today, yours tomorrow.....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info.

Regarding the styrofoam I saw it in a video where he places the styrofoam first in the shape of the base of the rock then sits the rock on top so to prevent scratching the glass and then puts the substrate over the styrofoam and base of rock so theres no way the styrofoam will float up.

I think I will end up going with this IF actually: https://www.allpondsolutions.co.uk/450lh-450if/ Since I will have a sliding glass roof on teh aquarium and overhang filter wont suit it really.

I plan to have my aquarium pretty low to the ground as it will be in the low section of a tv stand, so I dont think my current water syphon will work where the bucket needs to be lower than the tank, are there pump based siphons or good electric ones for water changes?
 

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Thanks for the info.

Regarding the styrofoam I saw it in a video where he places the styrofoam first in the shape of the base of the rock then sits the rock on top so to prevent scratching the glass and then puts the substrate over the styrofoam and base of rock so theres no way the styrofoam will float up.

I think I will end up going with this IF actually: https://www.allpondsolutions.co.uk/450lh-450if/ Since I will have a sliding glass roof on teh aquarium and overhang filter wont suit it really.

I plan to have my aquarium pretty low to the ground as it will be in the low section of a tv stand, so I dont think my current water syphon will work where the bucket needs to be lower than the tank, are there pump based siphons or good electric ones for water changes?

Get a python for water changes. Uses a sink faucet to create suction.
 

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I used it on 5 gallon tanks.

The faucet piece costs $5 on amazon and the brass adapter is $4. From there you just need a light duty hose which will cost around $15. If you have gravel you’ll need one of those vacuum pieces for about $10. So that’s $25-35, or cheaper if you already have a hose, to build your own. To never have to carry another container of water is worth the money. To me it’s worth several times as much. But I agree, on small tanks it’s not as necessary. Yes I used it on 5 gallon tanks, but I would not buy one just for a 5 gallon. In my opinion 10 gallons is the cut off. 10-20 gallons is where I see it start to be a benefit. Over 20 a necessity.




Don’t get zucked! Stand up to censorship! Someone else’s voice silenced today, yours tomorrow.....
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ordered the various parts for a Python system on Amazon shipping from the US to the UK and it costs £15, buying the same parts on Amazon UK costs £35. What a joke. :laugh:So hopefully it get's here ok.

Will just need to pick up a hose from my local hardware store then. Hopefully it works.
 

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Question 1. Plastic strips

On Amazon, type in LDPE Low Density Polyethylene Plastic Sheet 12x24x.060
This can be cut with good scissors or a utility knife. It is quite flexible. I used a strip of it glued, with silicone, to the bottom of my tank to keep sand and gravel separated. Not too expensive and did a great job for me. Zero effect on plants and fish. Also good as pieces cut to fit to keep gravel from shifting. :smile2:
 

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Hey there...

Glad to hear that someone else suffers from Multiple Tank Syndrome or (MTS). It is an amazing hobby to be associated with. Let me see if I can answer your questions for you in an unbiased fashion...

Question #1: To properly separate one substrate from another you could use small strips of plexiglass cut down to the size of your substrate depth. You could glue these pieces in with aquarium safe silicone - in the desired positions you like. This way you can cut the silicone pieces in whatever shape and size you want and then glue them all together creating the exact contour you prefer.

Question #2: Styrofoam padding does not matter unless you are placing the rocks directly on the bare glass bottom. Styrofoam does eventually break down. I don't know the exact timeframe, but it does deteriorate over time. There are two solutions in my experience. (1) You can lay some substrate down prior to laying the larger rocks down. This is the normal method for alleviating any anxiety regarding cracked glass related to pressure points of larger stones in your aquarium. Remember as water is added the actual weight of each item in your tank is reduced. (2) You can cut a piece of wood to match the dimensions of the underside of your tank. Cut a piece of wood that matches the depth, width, and length of your tank and place that under the tank for added support. I know many people who have done this. There have been a few people who have not measure correctly and this lead to leaks along the edges. If it helps at all; I have three 20G, two 40G, one 55G, a 90G, and a 125G and none of them have ever been supported in any other way than the way they came in the box. I use lots of heavy rock and have never had a problem ever...

Question #3: You can certainly transfer water from one tank to another. I do it all the time. If you are starting with a new filter on the new tank take one part of the old filtration system and add it to the new filter. I would recommend the top layer of the filtration media from the old and place it in the new. Taking half of the water from your older tank and placing it into the new tank is a fantastic idea. If you are transferring the old filtration system over to the new tank you can still transfer water that you would normally throw out during a routine water change. It will help cycle the new tank.

Question #4: With the fish that you have listed it doesn't matter what order you place them in the tank. As a matter of fact, you can place them all at once. They all tend to be small fish and are peaceful by nature. I have introduced much more fish than that in the past and have had no problems. Tetras, Danios, Ottos, and Cory's are all compatible with each other.

Happy Fishing!!
 

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