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I have raised just a few spawns from my albino bn plecos. The last brood was large - about 50. As they have developed several of the fry grew much faster than the others; and several just don't seem to be thriving. Also, I have notices several that have a crooked spine.
I am assuming that these need to be culled ---- What are the methods in culling fry??? and when should I do this??
 

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An ice bath is the method that requires just basic things around the house. Put a container of water into the freezer until a thin layer of ice forms on top, then break the ice, add the fish and walk away. They die quickly but the muscles reactions to the cold water make them move even afterwards and it isn't a pretty sight.
 

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They don't necessarily need to be killed... A lot of pet stores would take smaller fry for free or a low price. Killing healthy fish should really be kept as an absolute last resort, it's not exactly humane.

Crooked spined fish can be just fine, but if it is severe and impacts their quality of life kill-culling may be the best course of action. The best way to do this is either ice water SHOCK or clove oil. Ice water shock involves freezing water to the point that it has ice in it (salt can be added to delay freezing), and dropping the fish in. Clove oil, which I prefer, involved emulsifying a small amount of clove oil (which can be found in any drug store) in enough tank water to cover the fish. The jar is shaken, and the fish is added.
 

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You're not doing the tropical fish hobby any favors by letting those culls out of your fishroom alive. Bristlenose with a crooked spine are a genetic problem. You donate them to a shop, someone picks them up, eventually someone will get them to spawn. Now you have more fish with a genetic problem. Everyone tries to save all the fish when they start breeding, culling is an ugly part of breeding, but must be done. Often external deformities manifest themselves as internal deformities as well, you'll find deformed fish as well as runts die at an early age if you try to keep them.
 
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