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Discussion Starter #1
So I've been dealing with camallanus worms... it's a nightmare! :evil:

I have a 30 gallon community tank and I discovered the worms about a month or two ago. I've lost multiple guppies and 10 neons. My 3 panda garras have been infected as well. I saw the little red worms coming out of their anus and they are acting quite lethargic.

With my latest treatment I went the Fenbendazole/Panacur route since Levamisole is hard to come by. And from what I read people have sworn by the Panacur.

Day 1: Large water change (about 80%) and then soaked food with half a packet of Panacur in about 3-4 oz. of water
Days 2-4: Continued with feeding with the Panacur
Day 5: Another large water change (about 80%)

Right now I'm not seeing signs of worms in the guppies or tetras. I've tried looking at the garras but they are hiding. :-?

I think I'm going to do another round of treatment in two weeks time.

However, does anyone have any other suggestions for if this doesn't work? Also, does anyone know if there are no fish in the tank, will the worms die off? I have amano and ghost shrimp as well, but from what I read, the worms don't affect them?

This is quite the frustrating parasite.
 

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You'll want to do that treatment weekly for at least 3 weeks for best results.

The worms reside in the fish so taking the fish out will only 1) stress them which can lead to further illnesses and 2) they might get out of the main tank but then you'd have to separately dose them and I feel it'd be easier to keep them in the main tank--of course that is up to you; if you feel it'd be easier to take them out then that is your call.

From what I've read the crustaceans can carry the eggs of the worms so they can still be infected for the egg laying worms. I think there are two types? not certain but one is an egg layer and the other is a live bearer. Could be wrong about that though.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your response lilnaugrim!
So do you think I should do the 4 day treatment every week for 3 weeks... or treat for 3 weeks straight? I'll have to buy more Panacur.
And I just spotted another red worm coming out of my panda garra... darn worms. It's hard to get the bottom feeder fish to ingest the meds. *sigh*
 

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Levamisole is no longer readily on the market. Also Levamisole only paralyzes the worms so they can be passed but Pancur/Safe-Guard (Fenbendazole) kills the worms both in the fish and in the tank itself.

As for the treatment style, you should feed the fish twice daily with the medications for two days and do a large water change after that or on each of the day's if you see worms that came out. Make sure you absolutely soak the food in medication for 30 minutes to preferably an hour so it's saturated.
 

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levamisole is still avalible as i use it on all my quarantined fish. currently a few sellers on ebay for it. Levamisole is highly effective and i've cleared up more then one tank with confirmed camallanus. It also doesn't need to be injested which is important since infected fish usually have poor appetite.
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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for the responses! Thank you for the treatment plan as well lilnaugrim.

Right now I'm going to stick to the Panacur since I can readily get it and all my fish are still eating. But I'll look into ordering levamisole online as well.
 

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Ahh scratch that. I just asked my vet teacher and she said the last time she used it was years ago and it was a compound for horses. The most likely form you will find in local places if you can find it will be in compound.
 

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Either way I can verify that the Fenbendazoale has been working. Surprisingly it has taken a little bit, but I can't always get in and catch the worms before someone eats them. After probably around 4 weeks I am seeing an improvement in my 45 gallon tank. My guppies had also just started to contract the devil worms and I treated them right away and I haven't seen a worm since Friday. I think timing has a lot to do with it. Again, Fenbendazoale kills the worms themselves, Levamisole only paralyzes, which usually does result in death as well. You do need to take into consideration whether you think you have the livebearing form of camallanus or the egg layers. Egg layers usually need an intermediate host before the fish themselves. The livebearing worms can just spew out young and find any host.

Also, the dosing site seems legitamate until I got to the part with MDSS.... It should be MSDS, and the sheet does not include everything a MSDS should have. It made me question it a bit... Otherwise, it seems pretty good. Just be careful. Levamisole is an older drug, which may be effective, but also may not be as effective as big guns like Fenbendazoale when used correctly. This is mainly from a domestic animal stand point however, and may not completely apply to fish.

I honestly wish we could use Ivermectin on the fish, but its only in an inject-able form, and the margin for error is pretty much 0%... However one would assume that this would be a very effective method. :< Someday maybe. Either way. These are the devil worms. :mad:
 

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levamisole is the most effective dewormer out there. It removes the worms in 24 hours none of this 4 week treatment stuff. You retreat levamisole every 2-3 weeks for 2-3 doses which each take about 1 day and thats it. The retreatment is to remove any that might of survived. It being an older med has nothing to do with effectiveness. Levamisole was very widely used till about 2009 the only reason it has been nearly removed from the market is that it became a common cutting agent in cocaine.

I've cleared camallanus from multiple tanks with little issue including densely planted tanks where you can't really clean much.

Its typically the livebearing species you find in aquariums. I've also noticed in the past some infestations stay hidden until their host has died.
 

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levamisole is the most effective dewormer out there. It removes the worms in 24 hours none of this 4 week treatment stuff. You retreat levamisole every 2-3 weeks for 2-3 doses which each take about 1 day and thats it. The retreatment is to remove any that might of survived. It being an older med has nothing to do with effectiveness. Levamisole was very widely used till about 2009 the only reason it has been nearly removed from the market is that it became a common cutting agent in cocaine.

I've cleared camallanus from multiple tanks with little issue including densely planted tanks where you can't really clean much.

Its typically the livebearing species you find in aquariums. I've also noticed in the past some infestations stay hidden until their host has died.
LVM is not as effect of a drug on our normal domestic animals. I can give facts upon facts for this. Again, I study domestic animals, and I am not an ichthyologist yet, though I do aspire to have it off to the side. According to my veterinarian that I study with, LVM is not as effective as Fenbendazole. Fenbendazole has shown, IN domestic animals to be the better antiparasitical treatment. 98-100% of most common roundworms are eliminated with FBZ.

LVM is no longer used as much possibly because of cocaine, I honestly wouldn't know as I work with animals, not people, but mainly because its just not as effective against most roundworms. Why would you use the de-wormer that gets about 80% of worms when you can use the other that will get anywhere from 98-100%? Again, I am not a veterinarian yet, and I am not an ichthyologist yet.

The other issue is that I only gave 2 doses the first week and then 1 dose per week after. I was concerned about over doing it since I had no way to accurately measure how much of it each fish ate.

Efficacy of albendazole, levamisole and fenben... [Vet Parasitol. 1991] - PubMed - NCBI
Efficacies of fenbendazole and levamisole in the treatment of commercial turkeys for Ascaridia dissimilis infections
 

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Drop a note to Charles, if only to have a fun discussion Lucillia. He's a retired chemist with a PhD, and loves to talk shop. Some years back I had a table across from him at a swap up in Madison, one of the very few times I can say I appreciated selling at a slow event. He'd be able to tell you the advantages & disadvantages of the meds you've mentioned.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Ahh scratch that. I just asked my vet teacher and she said the last time she used it was years ago and it was a compound for horses. The most likely form you will find in local places if you can find it will be in compound.
Thank you for the info! :-D
 

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We are treating fish not mammals the differences are many including the environment they are in. A food born med like fenbendazole especially self prepared can be very difficult to use correctly and to actually get the fish to eat. If you have fish that are not eating as many more serious cases do then it will not get you very far. You need to calculate the med to food ratio then the fish to food ratio. Also the issue with how quickly the food needs to be eaten especially pre soaked food. Unless you are treating the water as well fenbendazole is definitely not guarantied to kill parasites outside of the treated fish. Its also poorly absorbed into the body. Along with the long treatment time.

Levamisole you treat the whole tank and the med is easily enough absorb it does not even need to be consumed by the fish. It also boosts immune system function in fish. And it the case of treating camallanus in fish it is by far the quickest, easiest, and most effective med you can use. Along with being very safe on fish. I seriously deworm all my new fish with levamisole at least once as a preventative. That includes my own wild caught panda garras as well.
 

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Yup, medicating fish isn't medicating turkeys. Seriously, drop Charles a line, he's a wealth of info. He isn't getting any younger, and if you're interested in the aquatic end of veterinary science he should be on your list. We need more fish vets!
 
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I appreciate everyone's input here but let's keep in mind that things change over the years. Unless Charles continuously still attends seminars and classes then it is very possible that he's not up to date on these medications.
 
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