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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone!! I am having a slight problem right now. Im having a brown Algae problem in a Tank that is 6-7 months old now. The Algae is not on my glass, but it is thickly coating my plants. After i noticed the problem i changed my florescent bulbs as they were a few months old. I replaced them with 2 10 Watt full spectrum bulbs and have not seen any of the Algae going away. My Nitrates are at 10ppm. Should i just scrub the algae off the plants?
 

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I would definitely wipe it off the leaves as too much buildup can cause problems for the leave/plant.

Can you post a pic of the algae/tank?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok, ill try wiping the plant's Leave. Ill post pics of the plants once get home from school. Should i remove the plant to do this, or should i wipe it off in the tank?
 

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No leave them in the tank. Also what size tank is this? How long has the algae been going on? What kinda of lights are they exactly? Do you use fertilizer?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It is a Aqua culture 10 gallon tank with Crypts, wisteria, and swords in it. It has a factory dual fluorescent outlet in it. Each bulb is 10 watts and there are 2 of them so 20 watts for this tank should be alright.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Also, i use no fertilizer and the algae has been going for about 3 weeks now. ever since my old bulbs lost their spectrum. But i have brand new ones in it now.
 

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Seeing the photo might help, as by "brown algae" I am wondering if you mean a green or red algae as opposed to diatoms. There are many types of green/red algae, and some to me look brown. If this is what it is, I doubt you will get it off the plants. But the photo will help here.

When the lighting becomes old it loses intensity, and this can cause algae to increase because the light is no longer sufficient intensity for the plants. The algae that is there will not go away; the aim is to stop it from increasing with the new light, which should happen if this was the issue.

Do you have fluorescent tubes, or screw-in bulbs?

Byron.
 

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The are fluorescent screw in bulbs, sorry
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That's fine. Compact Fluorescent bulbs. I was previously thinking that if you had two fluorescent tubes you might have too much light, but two CFL over a 10g is fine, I have the same.

I'll wait for the photo to comment further on the algae.

Byron.
 

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Ok well that doesn't look like diatoms to me but it could be?? Honestly I am going to sit back and wait for Byron to answer this one. I have my thoughts and ideas but am no expert and don't wanna steer ya wrong.
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I don't see that as diatoms either. This is a form of algae, I currently have this in my 90g; it is reddish-brown in my case. But it spreads and covers plant leaves. I also had it (or something similar) on areas of the end wall glass near the top (brighter light).

In my case I believe it arrived because of too much fertilization. Over the past year, I have been experimenting with one, two and three doses of Flourish per week. In this tank only this algae suddenly appeared, and I have cut back to once a week. The light has been the same throughout in my case.

There shouldn't be a light issue in your 10g with two 10w CFL bulbs (assuming they are 6500K, that can make a difference). How long is the light on daily?

You previously mention using no fertilizer. Are the plants growing well? A photo of the entire tank might help here. Nitrates were given as 10ppm which is not too high, but higher than I would expect in a planted tank that receives no fertilization. There must be sufficient (or perhaps excess) nutrients naturally. What is the fish load, and how often are they fed? How often are water changes and what volume?

Byron.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have a moderate fish load with 4 Dwarf Gouramis in it. The crypts are still growing well, but the wisteria and sword is having trouble since the algae. i don't have a fertilizer right now, but i might look into it.
 

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the lgith is on from 6 AM to 10 PM, i know that might be a little long lol
This is your main problem. This is far too long. And that is because there cannot be sufficient nutrients to balance the light for that long a photoperiod.

To explain. Plants need 17 nutrients and sufficient light intensity in order to photosynthesize (grow). As soon as some nutrient is no longer available, photosynthesis slows and may even stop altogether. As soon as that point is reached, an y continuing light, along with any remaining nutrients, are available for algae to use, and it will. The plants can only out-compete algae if everything they need is available.

I would first reduce the light period down to 10 hours. Using a timer is good, as it also provides for a regular day/night which helps the plants (and fish). The period can be any time, obviously when you are more usually home to enjoy the tank, so the light can come on at say 11 am and go off at 9 pm if you are home mainly in the evenings.

Second I would get a comprehensive liquid fertilizer and dose once a week. This will ensure the plants are getting everything. Flourish Comprehensive Supplement is the one I use, another is Brightwell Aquatics' FlorinMulti. For a 10g tank, you would only use about 1/4 of a teaspoon once a week, dosed on the day following the water change.

One essential nutrient is carbon, as CO2. This we do not add, but rely on the natural CO2 to provide carbon. This is usually the first nutrient to run out, so it takes some experimenting to get the balance.

You may need to reduce the light further, but start at 10 hours and see how the plants respond and what algae does. What is there will not go away; the aim is to prevent it from increasing, and to do that you have to find the balance.

Byron.
 
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