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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I started a new tank with 1 make beta and 3 shrimp but my beta keep getting lethargic and die. I’ve tested the waters and everything is normal and the heat is normal too. After day 2 or 3 of the beta being it it just dies and I can’t find any trace of sickness. All my shrimp seem to be completely ok. What am I doing wrong?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1. how big is the tank?
2. did you cycle the tank at least a week?
3. does the tank have a filter?
4. does the tank have a heater?
Thank is a 5 gallon
It was cycled about 3-4 days before I added this beta
It had a filter and a heater. Temp is at 78
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank is a 5 gallon
It was cycled about 3-4 days before I added this beta
It had a filter and a heater. Temp is at 78
I decided to try tetra lifeguard as a precaution and he seems a little more active since I added the first tablet but he’s still kinda just moving to different spots to sleep
 

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Thank is a 5 gallon
It was cycled about 3-4 days before I added this beta
It had a filter and a heater. Temp is at 78
The problem is the tank needs more than 4 days to cycle.
The tanks of mine with zero fish deaths have been planted tanks running for a year or more.
I'm not saying you need to wait a year; just more than 4 days. At least one month or so, and add snails, live plants, and (if you can get it) beneficial bacteria from a seasoned aquarium (maybe your fish store can help you?) People think "too clean" is a good thing. Nope. Algae and pest snails are indications life can thrive. Add fish food, and maybe a hearty fish like a guppy or two can get things going. I recommend almond leaves. They create tannins: just what the betta needs.
Also, "PetCoSmart" bettas have to have ammonia burn from those cups; I don't see how they can't. Even if they change the water once every 24 hours, that still leaves 12+ hour of ammonia build up.
The betta that has been healthiest for me was a "rescue" from a betta breeder who keeps her bettas in one-gallon tanks. He's doing great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The problem is the tank needs more than 4 days to cycle.
The tanks of mine with zero fish deaths have been planted tanks running for a year or more.
I'm not saying you need to wait a year; just more than 4 days. At least one month or so, and add snails, live plants, and (if you can get it) beneficial bacteria from a seasoned aquarium (maybe your fish store can help you?) People think "too clean" is a good thing. Nope. Algae and pest snails are indications life can thrive. Add fish food, and maybe a hearty fish like a guppy or two can get things going. I recommend almond leaves. They create tannins: just what the betta needs.
Also, "PetCoSmart" bettas have to have ammonia burn from those cups; I don't see how they can't. Even if they change the water once every 24 hours, that still leaves 12+ hour of ammonia build up.
The betta that has been healthiest for me was a "rescue" from a betta breeder who keeps her bettas in one-gallon tanks. He's doing great.
The problem is the tank needs more than 4 days to cycle.
The tanks of mine with zero fish deaths have been planted tanks running for a year or more.
I'm not saying you need to wait a year; just more than 4 days. At least one month or so, and add snails, live plants, and (if you can get it) beneficial bacteria from a seasoned aquarium (maybe your fish store can help you?) People think "too clean" is a good thing. Nope. Algae and pest snails are indications life can thrive. Add fish food, and maybe a hearty fish like a guppy or two can get things going. I recommend almond leaves. They create tannins: just what the betta needs.
Also, "PetCoSmart" bettas have to have ammonia burn from those cups; I don't see how they can't. Even if they change the water once every 24 hours, that still leaves 12+ hour of ammonia build up.
The betta that has been healthiest for me was a "rescue" from a betta breeder who keeps her bettas in one-gallon tanks. He's doing great.
Ah ok, I see where I can improve on that. Today was the last day of the tetra lifeguard and he seems to be doing way better. Way more active and eating more too. I took out 2 of my fake plants and replaces them with live so that leaves me with 5 live plants and 1 fake plant. Is there anything else I can do to improve on his tank? I think I’ve beat out whatever it was making him sick so I don’t want to make a mistake like that again.
 

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Ah ok, I see where I can improve on that. Today was the last day of the tetra lifeguard and he seems to be doing way better. Way more active and eating more too. I took out 2 of my fake plants and replaces them with live so that leaves me with 5 live plants and 1 fake plant. Is there anything else I can do to improve on his tank? I think I’ve beat out whatever it was making him sick so I don’t want to make a mistake like that again.
After many failed tanks (and dead fish) I decided the planted tank method was the way to go. I spent my money of the substrate. In my case, I chose SeaChem's Flourite black (they have other colors). This substrate is designed to grow plants. I adjusted the lights and added plants. When algae and "pest snails" showed up, I knew things were going as they should; algae and snails are life! Once my plants were thriving, I introduced red cherry shrimp and a few guppies. The guppies died, but everything else was fine. I just let things be (crazy plant and shrimp growth) for months. My mom was ill and died during this period, so I had to neglect the tanks. Once I introduced a few guppies, they thrived like crazy. I have 5 tanks full of guppies, shrimp, and a betta. I guess what the factor was that I was forced to put the tanks out of my mind for a few months. When I turned my attention back to my fish, I found they were thriving on my doing nothing but tossing some food in and topping off the water. Now, I don't do any water changes; just topping off. I do have high volume filters and tons of plants; I think that's the key. You need to create an ecosystem which can't be done in a few days. We all find this out the hard way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
After many failed tanks (and dead fish) I decided the planted tank method was the way to go. I spent my money of the substrate. In my case, I chose SeaChem's Flourite black (they have other colors). This substrate is designed to grow plants. I adjusted the lights and added plants. When algae and "pest snails" showed up, I knew things were going as they should; algae and snails are life! Once my plants were thriving, I introduced red cherry shrimp and a few guppies. The guppies died, but everything else was fine. I just let things be (crazy plant and shrimp growth) for months. My mom was ill and died during this period, so I had to neglect the tanks. Once I introduced a few guppies, they thrived like crazy. I have 5 tanks full of guppies, shrimp, and a betta. I guess what the factor was that I was forced to put the tanks out of my mind for a few months. When I turned my attention back to my fish, I found they were thriving on my doing nothing but tossing some food in and topping off the water. Now, I don't do any water changes; just topping off. I do have high volume filters and tons of plants; I think that's the key. You need to create an ecosystem which can't be done in a few days. We all find this out the hard way.
Yea, mistakes were made and now I know some of what I shouldn’t do. Luckily I somehow figured out out to reverse the effects of what was happening and I see my betta swimming around all day instead of sleeping like he was just a few days ago. Next time I will leave my take to cycle a lot longer than What i did. Again, this is my first tank so I’ve got some learning to do and I want to make sure I do it right
 
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