Tropical Fish Keeping banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was planning on setting up a 10 gallon, but when I mentioned it to my parents they decided they no longer wanted their tank (29 gallon). I live an hour away from my parents and I don't want to lose the fish that are currently in their tank. Any advice on the safest and least stressful way to move the fish? I was thinking either drain half the water and drive fast or should I bag them up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
Best thing to do is take the fish water and any decorations out. There's a good chance the tank will break if you try to move it full or even half full. Place the water in buckets so you don't have to start fresh with new water. Remove the gravel as well. For the fish most of the time I've seen people suggest putting the fish into Rubbermaid containers with tank water. As long as you aren't going too far that should be fine.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SeaHorse

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,201 Posts
29 is a lot better than a 10! First things first, drain all the water. There's really no need to bring it with you - you'll just be acclimating the fish to the new water with which you fill the tank. Using old water to fill the tank with does nothing but transfer nitrates. In a larger tank like a 4 footer, I would also suggest removing the substrate to move it but for a 29 you don't have to take it out. For an hour ride you can either bag the fish or just put them all together in a 5 gallon bucket (with a lid). Make sure your filter media stays wet for the trip.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,465 Posts
I have moved many large tanks and I agree 100% with the 2 above... I always put mine into a bucket with an air stone for all moments that they are near an outlet. Rubbermaid tubs works too but make sure it isn't too heavy to carry. Make sure your filter does not dry out... you have 24 hours to get it hooked back up so put it into a bucket full of tank water, or at least all the contents. For a canister filter just shut the valves and transport. Don't use this as an opportunity to clean everything or you will cause a cycle. Have them rinse the filter pads a few days before you come and get it, that would be ok. I also myself take the opportunity to rinse the gravel in clean de-chlor water, you don't want to kill the good bacteria but it makes it easier to fill the tank with water when you get home and have a lot less dirty water and work for your filter to do. If you want to you can put the gravel into totes too but make sure it stays wet and closed up. Even covered in tank water is good too. I've never lost a fish in a move. Commit to getting it torn down and set up all in one day. Just git-r done!! The fish can be back in their tank by night time. Good luck.
Pictures would be welcome!! I see a journal thread coming on!! :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I don't have anything that I can put the fish in while I am setting the tank back up at my house. If I use new water and put some stuff to take the chlorine out will it be ok to put the fish into that right away? I would use the same filter and decorations so they would have the good bacteria that would cycle the tank eventually, but that takes time right?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,465 Posts
Go to your local $1 store and get a few buckets if you can. As long as you keep everything wet and submerged in water you just set everything back up with new dechlor tap water and you are good to go!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,201 Posts
Buckets are really valuable in this hobby - if you don't have any, it's a good opportunity to grab a few.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,201 Posts
Go to Homedepot, they have 5 gallon buckets that are only a couple bucks which is really good for how sturdy they are

Yup. Don't forget the lid :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: SeaHorse

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,465 Posts
YES I agree (again)... just didn't know your budget or that super awesome buckets with lids existed for $2. And keep those buckets EXCLUSIVELY for your fish!! (i.e. don't keep these buckets with the regular household buckets).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I am probably going to go to home depot tomorrow and get the buckets and I am going to swing by the pet store to get some more stuff to remove the chlorine. Are certain brands better than others? I have used the API Stress Coat in the past to remove chlorine.

I am nervous about moving this tank. I actually had a 30 gallon tank about a year ago that had spilled about 20 gallons onto my floor when I got home one day (I think the silicone in one corner failed) and I moved my remaining fish to my parents tank, so some of these fish I have had for years and I have grown quite attached to. I just don't want to mess anything up in the move.

While I am thinking about it. Should I have put new silicone in the corners of the tank or is this something that just happened? The tank was about 2 years old when it happened.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,465 Posts
Prime for me too all the way.

Just make sure when moving the tank that if you need to tip it up you don't twist it. Always do things flat and square. (I'm cleaning a new tank, I think it was used as an ashtray.... so I had to tip it completely up on one side to hose it out. So I made sure that it was moved "square" and evenly and at no time rest it on one corner, always on a full flat surface on a full edge, full contact so there's nothing creating pressure on any one spot.) Does that make sense? Make sure you have someone to help at both ends of the tank and the journey so you don't move this thing alone if you can. I think your's was a fluke but it's easy to crack a seal if you don't handle the tank "square".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Thanks, I will look for prime then when I go.

Yes, Seahorse, that does make sense. I will keep that in mind when I start moving it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,692 Posts
I want to comment on something nobody picked up - you CANNOT just fill the tank and dump the fish in. You need to acclimate them to the new water. Do you know how to do that?
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,465 Posts
Yes very good point Flint!! You can use all new water 100% but acclimating them to both temp and PH is strongly advised. Your 2 cities can have very different water!! (I think if it were me, I would get that tank all set up and dechlor'd... then slowly add some of it's water in batches to the "fish bucket/tote" diluting down both temperature differences, PH differences and ammonia build up in the bucket. The Prime in the new tank water will take care of that too!) Thinking a drop(s) of Prime in the transfer bucket will help with Ammonia build up during the day too.
I wouldn't feed them the night before or the day of the move either! Once they are all moved in, lights out for rest and destressing and start a normal routine the next morning of lights and feeding. If you feel you need to feed them after they move in, then do so sparingly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,201 Posts
That's how I would do it as well. It's no different than acclimating new fish to your tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for the advice. Yes, I do know about acclimating them. I was planning on doing it exactly how you described only I was also going to put them into some gallon bags as well and let the temperature equalize to minimize any temperture changes.
Posted via Mobile Device
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top