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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone im new to here so I apologize if this is the wrong section im posting this thread. So I have started a 10 gallon fresh water aquarium everything was good so far I used 2 platy fish to start the cycle in my the tank. I was told by petco that it takes 2 weeks for the tank to fully cycle and I could start adding new fish, I did research on this and in most cases it says 5-6 weeks when it fully cycles. Anyway my tank is going into 4 weeks a couple days back I did an ammonia test stripe test and the lvl was harmful 3.0, so I did more research about doing a daily 25% water changes to bring it down which I did and today I tested it twice and the ammonia lvl was at 0. So do I have to worry about my tank not cycling or fish dying, I have 15 fish in the tank.
 

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you've made it 4 weeks out of a 5-6 week period to complete the cycleing process of a new tank

15 fish in a 10 gallon tank
you've made it this far

i would like to say your good to go
i'd suggest plants, ... but while it won't help with your ammonia (if your ph is high) it will help with nitrates (waiting for you at the end of the nitrogen cycle)

in your shoes i'd stick with what your doing, things seem fine enough and the extra worry about elevated ammonia you seem to be ontop of with water changes

i'm no expert (one tank i've had for about a year & half) but in my limited experience i'd say "good for you, you seem to be doing really well :)
 

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I wanted to do live plants in the tank but I did some research on them first and it was on a totally different level of learning and by then I already set up my tank but if its ok to still do plants what would be good for beginners and where do you get the live plants from because petco doesn't really have a wide variety.
 

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where to get, ... not sure

personally i try to stay away from stem plants. yet my tank is full of them

for most tanks though, ... and a tank that size, ... my usual go-to for recommending plants is anubias & java fern.

they're hardy and most fish won't touch them (i mean won't eat them), doing well in low-light. over time may grow dense, but don't require pruning unless you just want to thin things out.
 

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I wanted to do live plants in the tank but I did some research on them first and it was on a totally different level of learning and by then I already set up my tank but if its ok to still do plants what would be good for beginners and where do you get the live plants from because petco doesn't really have a wide variety.
Add the plants. It will get ammonia down to 0.

I like anacharis and vals.

also stop doint water changes and stop adding any chemicals.

(see link in my signature)

my .02
 

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imo in an overstocked tank that had ammonia at 3.0 a few days ago,i would not stop water changes.any time you test and see ammo above .25, do a water change. i would feed lightly until the tank is cycled. even with the addition of plants,you will still need to watch levels.the tank would have to be heavily planted with fast growing plants to not do water changes.. anubias and java fern are not going to cut it. hygro,wisteria,water sprite, anacharis would be better choices.have you tested for nitrites or nitrates?do not change the cartridges or media in your filter. if your cartridge seems clogged,give it a light rinse in used/conditioned tank water.do not go overboard cleaning your tank.you do not want to stall your cycle.
 

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With that many fish in a 10 gallon, I would do water change twice a week, even after its fully cycled and stable. That's just my opinion, other approaches might work as well or better.
I agree that plants will help your tank and I would reccommend anacharis, hornwort, and of course anubias.
Ammonia is very poisonous to fish so if your reading high levels, it is essential to correct the situation quickly. Plants will help longterm, but for right now, fresh water is your best medicine. If it was my tank I would change 2-3gallons ... 2-3 times per week.
Good luck!
 

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just wondering the ph of your tank? along with ammo,nitrite and nitrate.if those numbers could be provided it would help us to see the bigger picture.if you have a low ph,this could be an on going thing. best to figure it out now.
 

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+1

no plants and heavy fish load in a new tank. low ph is expected.


My concern it that it also represents very high levels of carbon dioxide.

And fish could start dropping any day now.

I would add 4-6 bunches of anacharis even if just floating in the tank to consume the carbon dioxide.


my .02
 

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Let's get back to basics. First of all, I infer that you're using test strips to evaluate your water parameters (ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pH). Strips can be somewhat to very inaccurate. You won't really know what your readings are until you test with a liquid test kit like this one (which most of us use).
Amazon.com: API Freshwater Master Test Kit: Pet Supplies


If your pH is really that low, there's little chance of achieving a nitrogen cycle. You'll have to modify your pH slowly by modifying your water hardness (GH and KH). This is easily done. (Much easier than softening water and lowering pH.) But we won't know how or how much until you get more accurate readings of your tank.

Until you get your test kit, do only small water changes (10%) every day. Dose Prime water conditioner by Seachem @ 2-drops gal tank size with every water change. If your pH really is that low, you don't want large wc's to change your pH radically. Prime is ensure any ammonia produced is safely detoxified.

Bbob brings up a good point. You should have a bubbler running and/or a filter splashing in order to oxygenate the water.

Eventually, you may have to get a hardness test to determine you GH and KH. This influences your pH and what measures you might take to raise and stabilize it. Only then can you effectively proceed to cycling your tank.
 

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.

Bbob brings up a good point. You should have a bubbler running and/or a filter splashing in order to oxygenate the water.

.
Just to be clear my actual point was to use plants to consume the carbon dioxide and return oxygen.

I have simply found that is much more effective that circulation.

But still that's just my .02
 

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Throwing plants into a tank is not going to have the desired effect unless they are healthy and growing. For this you need appropriate lighting, maybe ferts. And that starts up a whole new learning curve.

I'd like to see the water evaluated, stabilized and corrcted (if necessary) and a strong conventional nitrogen cycle established. Then playing around with plants and learning their not inconsiderable requirements will be up the the OP.
 
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