Tropical Fish Keeping banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hello i have a 125 gallon freshwater setup stocked with a mixture of geophagus cichlids and a few others i've had this tank running for almost two years im running a fluval fx5 i've recently have had issues with my ammonia levels being higher then i've liked i do 30-40% weekly water changes i run fluval ceramic and a fair amount of carbon i also just added a 100gallon pack of purigen to the filter per my lfs recommendations and there has been no change to the ammonia levels i cant gravel vac since i use sand and i feed every other day so im really no sure what the issue is i'm wondering if removing the ceramic and replacing with bio rings would help i also haven't added any fish in a while other then a large uaru i got from a friend any input would help not sure on this one
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,201 Posts
What are your readings?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
690 Posts
I'd suspect the test. The liquid ammonia test sells for $5 online, probably costs $1 to manufacture. It's a far cry from laboratory grade. A level of .25ppm is well within the error parameters of the test, but for peace of mind you could have a shop test it with a liquid test from a different supplier.

A couple years back many folks were having false readings from the API ammonia test, could have been a bad run, these things happen. It was the same issue, a .25ppm reading that would never drop.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pop

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,201 Posts
Adding more media for the bacteria to colonize will make up the difference, provided a shortage of real estate for the bacteria is the problem. Fish do grow and I can see a scenario in which the bioload of the tank eventually exceeds what the filtration system can handle, causing a perpetual reading. Also, within that scenario, too low of a GPH from the filter will mean a higher concentration of ammonia for the bacteria to handle - perhaps too high to be processed in one pass through the filter. Adding more media or increasing the rate of circulation (higher GPH on filtration) will rule that out. However, a deficit like that would grow, not remain constant so that lends credibility to what tolak said about a faulty test. You could try using a different test to compare results.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
i run and fluval fx5 filter which should do the job and then some from what im told i also use a decent size power head to move the water i forgot to mention my tank has smelled a bit fishy since ammonia has increased i haven't had any dead fish and i have plenty of carbon in filter i feed spectrum pellet and omega flake have for years feed every other day
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,201 Posts
Yeah, it's probably not a matter of not enough filtration.

Do you have nitrite readings?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
I'd suspect the test. The liquid ammonia test sells for $5 online, probably costs $1 to manufacture. It's a far cry from laboratory grade. A level of .25ppm is well within the error parameters of the test, but for peace of mind you could have a shop test it with a liquid test from a different supplier.

A couple years back many folks were having false readings from the API ammonia test, could have been a bad run, these things happen. It was the same issue, a .25ppm reading that would never drop.
+1

I'd confirm the readings with a LFS or two or even a fish club brother/sister (if you have clubs in your area).....

Doesn't sound like you should have ammonia, but I agree with the varying accuracy of the test.

How are your fish acting?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
+1

I'd confirm the readings with a LFS or two or even a fish club brother/sister (if you have clubs in your area).....

Doesn't sound like you should have ammonia, but I agree with the varying accuracy of the test.

How are your fish acting?
most of the fish seem to be acting the norm im going to bring a water sample down to my lfs and see what happens
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top