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Hello,

I have a 10 gallon newly planted tank with a beta, 2 panda cats, 1 mystery snail and 1 otto (I have a friend coming for him, his original friend scooted out of the tank and I found him too late - he was in the corner like he scooted up the seam of the tank). I have a narrow leaf chain sword and micro sword in the tank. I was having a significant issue with brown algea and after speaking with a not so LFS (I only have Petsmart and Petco local, a non-box store is over an hour away), they suggested planting so the plants could use the nutrients that the algea was using. Per their suggestion, I removed 75% of my substrate, since the brown algea lives in that and replaced it with extra gravel I had. And I added the plants. They stated I didn't need to change anything else nor did I need to add anything fertilizer wise. My plants appear to be doing well, the chain sword has created a bunch of chains and the micro sword seems good. But now I appear to have a green algae of some sort. I'm not sure exactly what to do at this point. I never had algae problems before (I've got a 20 gallon that is crystal clear) but I moved in December and have been struggling with this tank since. The 20 gallon handled the move fine, but my 10 didn't. I use the same filter, light on both tanks.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
 

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Nerite snails are the best algae eaters I've found in all my years of aquarium keeping they need brackish water to breed so you don't have to worry about that they eat most types of algae like you my lfs is over an hour away you can find some good deals on eBay hit me back and I'll give you the name of a vendor I order my plants from
 

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Nerite snails are the best algae eaters I've found in all my years of aquarium keeping they need brackish water to breed so you don't have to worry about that they eat most types of algae like you my lfs is over an hour away you can find some good deals on eBay hit me back and I'll give you the name of a vendor I order my plants from
Ok, I got my mystery snail from a place called aquaticarts.com and I've gotten a few fish from them as well. They have nitrile snails and are great to deal with but it never hurts to have another source. Will that be too much in my 10 gallon- everything but the beta will be algae eaters then or at least bottom feeders. And the nitrile snails will leave my plants alone? If that's ok, how many should I get? I don't want to overload the tank. Thank you!!!
 

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  1. Just one should do you could use black Molly's I keep two in a 55 and they are allways munching the vendor I get my plants and snails from go to eBay (I buy a lot from it)search. grumpy-bear-art(10287) or you can search live aquarium plants look for some for 3.00 it should be her she has a good deal spend 20.00 you get free shipping this is one of my 55's all the plants came from her they also are a good way to keep algae down she sells out all the time so you might have to check back often 20200606_112117.jpg
 

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Brown "algae" isn't really an algae at all. The only way to get rid of it is to scrape, let the substrate catch it, and then vacuum it up. Algae eaters and plecos are good for keeping it under control once you get the majority of it out.

Check your nitrates. If you've getting a lot of the green algae, it's probably high and you need to do some frequent water changes to get it down.
 

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How long are your lights on for? You might want to try cutting the length of time the lights are on down a bit. The light will be stronger in a 10 than in your 20 since the 10 gallon is a shorter height and the light is able to penetrate to the bottom better. It's all about finding that balance of light and nutrients in planted tanks. Often newly planted tanks take a bit of time to sort out and find that balance.
 

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Brown "algae" isn't really an algae at all. The only way to get rid of it is to scrape, let the substrate catch it, and then vacuum it up. Algae eaters and plecos are good for keeping it under control once you get the majority of it out.

Check your nitrates. If you've getting a lot of the green algae, it's probably high and you need to do some frequent water changes to get it down.
Ok, that's what I've been doing but I feel like I've been losing the battle, I get it under control and then it pops back up.

And that's the weird thing - all my water parameters are good - I use the ADP test kit not strips. This is the first time that I've been at a loss for what the issue is, when I first started it was easier to figure out because the water was always slightly off. But for this, I've got no explaination.
 

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How long are your lights on for? You might want to try cutting the length of time the lights are on down a bit. The light will be stronger in a 10 than in your 20 since the 10 gallon is a shorter height and the light is able to penetrate to the bottom better. It's all about finding that balance of light and nutrients in planted tanks. Often newly planted tanks take a bit of time to sort out and find that balance.
I've cut way back on the lights because at first I thought that was the issue since I used to turn them on when I left for work (7:30ish) and turn them off about 9pm. So now they are on a timer that has them on for 8 hours a day. They get semi-bright sunlight from the windows but not direct sunlight. The 20 gallon gets far more direct/bright sunlight and it's lights are on for 12 hours.
 
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