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Okay so this is probably a bad idea but I’ve been considering hatching my mystery snail’s eggs. We bought her from a pet store on the 24th and a few days ago she laid a clutch of eggs. I just wiped it off and threw it in the trash, not wanted to have 30 little mystery snails swimming around. Now, she’s laid another one and I’m considering keeping it. In order to do that, I would have to remove it from my tank and move it into a Petri dish until they hatch. Is there anyway to do that without harming the baby snails? I’m really a beginner, I’ve only had a beta fish, a few guppies and some mystery snails and I’ve only been into fish keeping for about two years now. Is it a good idea to try and do this as a beginner? Plus, I wouldn’t be keeping them I would just be selling them so I’m not sure it’s worth the effort. Anyways, if anyone here is an expert on mystery snails and their eggs, get back to me. Thanks!
 

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Your eggs may or may not be fertile. Females can store sperm, but they are also known to lay infertile clutches. Since you don't have a male in the tank they won't be guaranteed to be fertile. Fertile eggs should get dark points in them eventually, and in my experience fertile eggs get larger as they get closer to hatching. Also keep in mind that there are lots and lots of eggs in one clutch - 200 isn't uncommon. Even without all of them surviving, you can get tons of young. Personally if I could go back I wouldn't have hatched as many as I have, as they have a pretty high bioload. Make sure you have room for all those snails, and that you'll be able to find homes for them all. You might have a bit of trouble shipping in winter and finding local homes with Covid right now, so keep that in mind. Mystery Snails usually only live between 1 to 2 years, so they get large and sexually mature quite quickly. This means that your new snails will be breeding themselves before long, and you'll have to make sure to keep an eye out for eggs each day so you don't get overpopulated.

I always hatch mine in tank, so I haven't moved them. But supposedly if you dampen the eggs and then just slide them gently by hand along the glass till they come loose they can be removed undamaged. The main need of the eggs is humid air. They should not be submerged in water. I have a glass and plastic lid with no gaps and a layer of air between the water surface and the lid of the tank, and this provides enough humidity for the eggs to do well right where they were laid. I've heard of people using seran wrap to cover gaps in lids, and that can help with the humidity as well. The young primarily eat algae and the little micro-organisms in algae at first, although they will go after crushed sinking foods as well. Leaving the side and back panel of the tanks with algae and having some live plants in the tank will usually ensure they can graze all day as needed. They will be developing their shells quickly, so a pH of 7.4 or higher and water of a moderate hardness will be important for development. Unflavored cuttlebone (like for birds) should be provided as a calcium supplement.
 

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Your eggs may or may not be fertile. Females can store sperm, but they are also known to lay infertile clutches. Since you don't have a male in the tank they won't be guaranteed to be fertile. Fertile eggs should get dark points in them eventually, and in my experience fertile eggs get larger as they get closer to hatching. Also keep in mind that there are lots and lots of eggs in one clutch - 200 isn't uncommon. Even without all of them surviving, you can get tons of young. Personally if I could go back I wouldn't have hatched as many as I have, as they have a pretty high bioload. Make sure you have room for all those snails, and that you'll be able to find homes for them all. You might have a bit of trouble shipping in winter and finding local homes with Covid right now, so keep that in mind. Mystery Snails usually only live between 1 to 2 years, so they get large and sexually mature quite quickly. This means that your new snails will be breeding themselves before long, and you'll have to make sure to keep an eye out for eggs each day so you don't get overpopulated.

I always hatch mine in tank, so I haven't moved them. But supposedly if you dampen the eggs and then just slide them gently by hand along the glass till they come loose they can be removed undamaged. The main need of the eggs is humid air. They should not be submerged in water. I have a glass and plastic lid with no gaps and a layer of air between the water surface and the lid of the tank, and this provides enough humidity for the eggs to do well right where they were laid. I've heard of people using seran wrap to cover gaps in lids, and that can help with the humidity as well. The young primarily eat algae and the little micro-organisms in algae at first, although they will go after crushed sinking foods as well. Leaving the side and back panel of the tanks with algae and having some live plants in the tank will usually ensure they can graze all day as needed. They will be developing their shells quickly, so a pH of 7.4 or higher and water of a moderate hardness will be important for development. Unflavored cuttlebone (like for birds) should be provided as a calcium supplement.
Thank you for the help! I called a pet store and they said they would take all of them once they reach appropriate sizing. I’m thinking of buying a 1.5 gallon tank just so they have some space to grow in. Is that big enough? Also, can they eat slime jello?
 

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I would go with at least a 5 gallon tank, as below that size it is difficult to safely heat and the water quality tends to be poor. I'm not sure about the slime jello, as I've never fed it before. In my experience as long as the foods are finely crushed they will eat anything an adult would.
 
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