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Hi Angel!
No problem! Fyi, since my last related post, we've updated the 20g long:
- Added a few live plants;
- Added another piece of driftwood;
- Added a Java moss wall.

Shrimp:
- We added ~ 30 RCS (all sizes) and they love the driftwood and moss wall. The fish (below) don't seem to bother them, although every once in a while a shrimpie will move to close to the top and they chase it, but no personal visual of them snacking on them.

Fish:
- 6 Neons (3M/3F);
- 2 Molly's (1M/1F);
- 2 Corydoras;
- 2 Guppy's (1M/1F);
- 1 Swordtail (M);
- 2 Flourescent zebras.

One of these days I will get pics posted. We also just (today) set up a 37g tall; it's cycling right now.

Thank you for the reply! It is appreciated. Also, here is a link to another "shrimpie" site:
http://www.planetinverts.com/

Best Regards!
Pabearpa
 

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I'm only going to guess that the mollies and the swordtail will bother the shrimp. Then again, when the shrimp molt, everything will bother them. But with a moss wall, the shrimp will hide there when they molt. It's a very good thing in a shrimp tank, I had one in my shrimp tank when I was double-using it as a fry tank, and when the fry got to about a half inch in length, the shrimp mainly just stayed between the mesh of the moss wall. I've since removed the moss wall because it makes it hard to net shrimp in a shrimp-only tank, but they really do love those. I replaced the moss wall with a moss ball, and they love it equally. The females hide in it when they molt. (females can only mate right after a molt, so they hide especially well) the males wont hide as much after molts, so you may eventually end up with a mostly female colony (not a bad thing... If I was a shrimp, i'd love a mostly female colony :p)

You probably will never see your fish eat your shrimp though. It's very quick, and it happens very seldomly with adult shrimp (only after they molt). However, when you get baby shrimp, you may never see them, or if you do, it may be only to see them being eaten by your fish :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
That's some very good updates you made there ont he tank for the shrimp, they'll love the offered hiding spots, not only when they molt as mentioned above already but also for their baby's.
 

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Thank you both for the comments! You're right, the shrimp love the wall as we can see all different sizes taking advantage of it at any given time! Plus, adding that and the other live plants helped clear up the water also!
Br,
Pabearpa
 

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I have been using Seachem Flourish comp for over a month now in my 5G Betta & shrimp tank (it only has 3 ghost shrimp in it with my Betta) all are well have just enjoyed the bloodworm treats I put in for my Betta :).

Though dont hold me responsible if your shrimp die or mutate into flying killer shrimp if you use it!

Tomsk
 

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Does anyone know if a 1.5 gallon hexagon pico tank would be able to house ghost shrimp? my mom got a 1.5 gallon hex pico from a friend and it came with a little wood sponge thing and a arch with fake plants.

Also don't be suprised if I ask a bunch of questions, I've never kept shrimp.
 

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I am truly sorry ya'll! I never thought when I added this guide way back when there'd be that many continues questions on here. Unfortunately as you all noticed I have no more chance of being on here regularly. I sure hope you were able to re-post your questions and got support for the super Admins and Users here !
 

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Diet:
All shrimp will feed off of a variety of blanched vegetables*, algae wafers, pellet or flake foods as well as frozen foods. Within a community tank, whatever you offer the fish will be sufficient enough for the shrimp to eat. Having certain algae present in your tank will also be a welcoming food source. (For best balanced food, supplying hair/ thread algae is advisable.)

As a color enhancer for shrimp with red coloration, it has proven best in my set-ups to feed dried pumpkin slices every once in a while. A bonus for healthy shrimp as a snack every once in a while would be spirulina tablets.

For the most natural look in any tank, as well as a great food source, dried leaves from oak and beech trees make a welcoming addition. Collect those in the fall and pour boiling water over them and once they dry, add them to the tank for a tasty snack. It has been well documented and I can confirm this from own experience that not offering the leaf litter within the tank will often cause molting problems (a shrimp that can not molt will simply die).

* Vegetables and fruit that will be accepted and good for your shrimp: Grapes, Cantaloupe, Cucumber, Bell Peppers, Lettuce, Spinach, Peas, Squash, Tomatoes, Pumpkin, Broccoli


Sexing:
Once adults, sexing is very easy for most species as the females will grow larger than the males and also their bellies grow larger and rounder than the males. When viewed from above, in comparison, females are a little wider towards the rear than males.


Breeding:
Shrimp can be easily separated into 2 breeding categories.
The fist and most common one is the female shrimp carrying the eggs under her belly for an average of 4-6 weeks which is influenced by water parameters but mainly the temperature. Upon hatching, you will see miniature versions of their parents that are completely independent and fairly easy to raise, provided there is enough food for the offspring.
The second and less common one is for the female to carry the eggs for about 5-6 weeks upon which 1mm larvae will hatch. These then require, depending on the exact species, either brackish or full saltwater tank to mature. Then upon adulthood, they will become freshwater again (which is better determined by size; once they reach 5-6mm they should return to freshwater again).
Shrimp start to breed at the age of 3-6 months and generally breed every 6-8 weeks. Most often, you will see about 30-50 eggs per female.


Behavior:
Dwarf Shrimp are extremely active little creatures that reveal their full potential in a species tank. They will not only sift through the sand to find their food, but climb rocks and driftwood, tunnel thought Java moss, and swim upside down on the surface to be the first to get the food. Most of this behavior will however subside if housed in a community with fish (being their natural predators) they will hide and be rather boring to the observer.
Over the years in my species tanks, it is easy to say I fell in love with them and their very own forthcoming, yet sort of shy, behavior. I can spend countless hours just watching them. While its not a well documented fact, but observing for years now does suggest they have a pack order similar to what you may see in dogs.

I hope that I awakened your interest now to set up your very own shrimp tank and will soon see many new threads started here to discuss individual set-ups case per case. I will also gladly answer any queries via PM.
No idea if you said this, but I would definitely recommend a lid. Because out of my 15 shrimp, 10 of them have climbed out of the tank. i Would just recommend a lid
 
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