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Discussion Starter #61
Thanks, I am still thinking about my stupid mistake, but moving forward and know the same mistake won't be made, and yes tank bred, were in quarantine for 2 weeks and at the LFS for a total of 3 weeks, they seem to be in great shape! I just hope they will get along as well as the other 2 I had :(
 

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Ya tank looks real good.
Don't think I've ever seen a filter quite like that one.
I'm just glad, no offense everyone, to see a tank that's bigger than five gallons
and doesn't have a betta in it.
I know, even though I said "no offense", it's still gonna
offend several of the peeps on here.
I just think tanks that small are more trouble than their worth.
Terryap, you'll be glad that salt stuff is in a large tank and not a small one.
Easier to maintain and less problems with water quality.
Not to mention ya can fit more cool stuff in there.
 

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Ya tank looks real good.
Don't think I've ever seen a filter quite like that one.
I'm just glad, no offense everyone, to see a tank that's bigger than five gallons
and doesn't have a betta in it.
I know, even though I said "no offense", it's still gonna
offend several of the peeps on here.
I just think tanks that small are more trouble than their worth.
Terryap, you'll be glad that salt stuff is in a large tank and not a small one.
Easier to maintain and less problems with water quality.
Not to mention ya can fit more cool stuff in there.
Not quite sure I completely agree here.

Generally speaking, small tanks are just as easy as big ones so long as you keep on top of things. If you have a fatality then a large water volume will act as a buffer but thats about the only benefit I can see. With correct stocking, the waste produced should be the same in any tank you keep (to scale of coarse).

In fact, there are numerous benefits to smaller tanks. Water changes are MUCH easier, the initial outlay on the tank and kit is considerably less and shallower depths means achieving good light intensity within the tank is also MUCH easier.

The list could go on too.



P.S. The spelling error is a fish related pun. Cookie to the first to spot it. ;-)
 

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Generally speaking, small tanks are just as easy as big ones so long as you keep on top of things. If you have a fatality then a large water volume will act as a buffer but thats about the only benefit I can see. With correct stocking, the waste produced should be the same in any tank you keep (to scale of coarse).

In fact, there are numerous benefits to smaller tanks. Water changes are MUCH easier, the initial outlay on the tank and kit is considerably less and shallower depths means achieving good light intensity within the tank is also MUCH easier.
Honestly, i just disagree completely. I don't want to steal a thread and get into a debate on this, so perhaps a new topic would be needed. But in my experience, larger tanks are much easier to maintain.

The benefits are extreme, and until you have maintained a larger system you may not have the background to do a good comparison. The biggest benefit I see is fish behavior, which is much more predictable in larger systems. You also have the added benefit that changes occur slowly and are disbursed over larger volumes of water, causing much less stress on livestock. There is also a cost per gallon benefit, with the cost of setup per gallon of water being much less than on smaller systems.

I really can't see any positive justification for setting up a small system, other than saving space and meeting a challenge.
 

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That's a nice looking Hippo.

I hope that you aren't planning on putting the 130 where the 65 is. I had a heck of a time trying to put my 150 on the same wall as my 46; I ended up having to keep a 20 gallon for a few weeks while the 150 cycled.

When are you planning on starting the 130?
 
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