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I have an empty 20 gallon high just sitting around, and I'm trying to decide what I could possibly put in it.

I really, really like Honey Gouramis. However, I have a few questions about them. First off, would it be better for the Gourami to be kept as the only specimen of its species in the tank, or would it be better to have a male-female pair?
If they would be better off with a male-female pair...
Would they probably breed in the tank if I didn't intentionally breed them, and if so, would any fry likely survive?
Would they become too territorial while in breeding mode to be with the Neon Tetras or the Cory Cats, or both?

If I had the Gouramis, Cories, and Neon Tetras in my tank would anyone eat eggs or fry, be they from the Gouramis, Cories, or Tetras?

Would it be okay to put the Julii Cories and the Gourami(s) in after finishing a fishless cycle, or should I wait until the tank is mature for one or both of those species? I know I have to wait a few months till the tank is nice and mature to add in the Neon Tetras.

If the Honey Gouramis go after very small fish, how large would the Neon Tetras have to be to be safe around a Honey Gourami? The store I would get all the fish from always has very young Neon Tetras, sometimes as small as a quarter of an inch, and usually not larger than an inch, and I need to know if that would be a problem or not.

And most importantly, would I even have enough room in a 20 gallon high for a Honey Gourami or two, 6 Julii Cories, and 6 Neon Tetras? If so, would I have room to give the Neon Tetras a few more companions for their school in a 20 gallon, and if so how many more could I put in? If I don't have room for all three species, would I have room for just the Gourami(s) and 6 Cories? I'd rather have at least 6 Cories and not have another school, I really like to keep my Cory Cats in good-sized groups.
 

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With 6 cories and 6-8 neons you'd be pretty full already, but combining all 3 species wouldn't be a problem, they should all get along.

I know Gourami's make bubble nests at the surface, but I've never kept them so I'm not sure if they'd be protected from the other fish..

I'd mature the tank a bit before adding the Gourami's, but cory's and neons have been pretty hardy in my experience.

Let us know what you decide :)
 

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I think you definitely have room for all three species. You could get two honey gouramis and even if they turn out not to be male and female they should still get along as they're one of the friendlier gourami species. I'd say two honey gouramis, 8 or 10 neons and six cories would be a nice stocking list. You could always get small honey gouramis so that they wouldn't be able to eat the small neons, but I think full-grown honeys might try to eat quarter-inch neons. I think inch long neons would be safe with full grown honeys, though. Whatever you do, I can't recommend doing a fishless cycle enough. Be sure to stock the tank slowly as well.
 

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I my experience, the honey would be the most hearty, followed by the corys. You might add corys in pairs rather than all at once. I would not add the neons, esp tiny ones, until 6-8 weeks in.

In general, I would not expect the neons or corys to really go after any honey fry, but they would eat them if the can.

You might find that you don't have enough activity in the upper half of the tank, myself I would consider a trio of danios, hatchets or penguins.
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I think you definitely have room for all three species. You could get two honey gouramis and even if they turn out not to be male and female they should still get along as they're one of the friendlier gourami species. I'd say two honey gouramis, 8 or 10 neons and six cories would be a nice stocking list. You could always get small honey gouramis so that they wouldn't be able to eat the small neons, but I think full-grown honeys might try to eat quarter-inch neons. I think inch long neons would be safe with full grown honeys, though. Whatever you do, I can't recommend doing a fishless cycle enough. Be sure to stock the tank slowly as well.

+one.8)
 

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keep the honey's paired up... sexing is hard unless the males are ready to breed. they show off color at that point which makes it apparent.

as for the rest, just take your time putting the rest in.

I'd second the motion for danio's, but they are one of my fav species lol... if you want color go with the pearl danio or get some glofish danio's.
 
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