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Hello I have a 15 gallon bare bottom with 2 filters in it. There is an oranda, 2 commit goldfish, a common goldfish and pleco in it at the moment, but I would like something new, but i also want to make sure i have the right space for it to be right. I wanted to get angelfish but i realized i didn't have the right space for when they grow as well as koi. So now i'm thinking guppies but i'm not 100% sure. Any other suggestions? much appreciated
-Sorcha
 

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Good idea on taking out the goldfish.

Guppies make a great choice, and you can totally have a group of them in there. I'd recommend to keep all males, so you dont end up with 100's of fish.
Other good fish would be corydoras, and id recommend sticking with the dwarf cory species... and that way, you have some interest on the bottom. Other good fish include
-otos
- tetras (ember tetras look great, but smaller tetras like cardinals, neons ect would work too)
- shrimp
- snails
- sparkling gourami (they should be fine with guppies, but its worth mentioning that they known to be a little aggressive at times)

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Thank you :D I didn't even know that sparkling gourami even exist but I really like them, the all male guppies I'm leaning toward but I also love the different kinds of tetras. If I put in 6 male guppies and 2 corys (the one I already have and a new one) how many tetras would fit comfortably in a 15 gallon with 2 filters that are cleaned once a week and a 50% water change once a week?
 

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Yeah, definitely a good idea taking out those fish. All of them grow much too large to be kept together long term :)
Fancy goldfish also need higher temperatures than regulars (comets/commons), and one goldfish needs 20 gallons or bigger to live in lol. Or a pond! ^_^


I would look into dwarf species of fish just like aussie said!


Ember tetras are beautiful, you could do 10-12 in there with some Corydoras Habrosus or Pygmeus and it would look great! Here are some other fish you can look into:


Ember Tetra
Jelly Bean Tetra
Harlequin Rasbora
Espei Rasbora
Chili Rasbora
Mosquito Rasbora
Celestial Pearl Danio
Emerald Danio
Celebes Rainbow
Gertudae Rainbow (Blue-eyed)
Neon Dwarf Rainbowfish
Lampeye Killifish
Golden Wonder Killifish
Fundulopanchax Gardneri (Killifish)
Dario Dario (Scarlet Badis)
Peacock Gudgeon
Corydoras Habrosus (Dainty Cory)
Corydoras Pygmaeus (pygmy cory)
Apsidoras species (cousins to Corydoras and typically small)
Kuhli Loach
Otocinclus




The other thing you have to remember is Temperature compatibility. Danio's and Tetra's should not be housed together due to a few things: temperature requirements are different and Danios also prefer fast moving waters whereas Tetras stay in slow moving areas.


Some fish are shy like Dario's, they should be housed with fish that are also shy and aren't going to bug them too much.


Many of the fish I listed need to be in groups of at least 6 or more to be healthy and active. So make sure you keep that in mind as well! Can't do one of each fish! That's bad :-( I've seen people do that and end up with really sick fish after a time because they aren't keeping properly!


That's the thing with Fish Keeping, it is a hobby in a sense that it's something done on the side typically but you're still caring for a real, live animal! We always strive to do the best for those animals! So it's great that you've hopped onto our forum! As long as you're willing to learn, there are plenty of people to learn from here! So here is my official:
Welcome to the forum!
 

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Also you might think about getting some gravel or something. It can store a lot more of the bacteria necessary to convert ammonia and nitrates to less harmless chemicals. Plus it might look better.:)
 

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Unless your using an undergravel filter, gravel does not contain much beneficial bacteria and is purely considered a cosmetic.

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I don’t know how much bacteria gravel actually holds. I don’t think it’s near as much as sand, due to surface area differences. I do know that people often recommend against vacuuming the entire gravel bed for fear of killing off too much bacteria and causing a minicycle. I personally think that’s nonsense, but there are a lot of people who subscribe to that notion.
 

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With an under gravel filter, the gravel will hold the vast majority of your bacteria because it’s got the most amount of surface area.
 

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Thank you :D I didn't even know that sparkling gourami even exist but I really like them, the all male guppies I'm leaning toward but I also love the different kinds of tetras. If I put in 6 male guppies and 2 corys (the one I already have and a new one) how many tetras would fit comfortably in a 15 gallon with 2 filters that are cleaned once a week and a 50% water change once a week?


First things first - don’t clean your filters every week! While it may seem wrong to let your filters get dirty, that’s where your beneficial bacteria lives and disturbing it that often could cause stability problems. Really, they don’t need to be cleaned until water flow is reduced. Aqua clear filters, for example, are designed to pop the top of the filter up when they need to be cleaned. Now if you’re experiencing restricted water flow on a weekly basis, well then there’s a big problem.

15 gallons is not very common - what are the dimensions of the tank? I think the dimensions are more important than the number of gallons when considering swim space for the fish.
 

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I don’t know how much bacteria gravel actually holds. I don’t think it’s near as much as sand, due to surface area differences. I do know that people often recommend against vacuuming the entire gravel bed for fear of killing off too much bacteria and causing a minicycle. I personally think that’s nonsense, but there are a lot of people who subscribe to that notion.
I was along the line of the bacteria in our tanks require aerobic conditions, which if there is no constant water source it can turn anaerobic quickly. However, anaerobic conditions promote a 3rd kind of bacteria, which convert nitrates into nitrogen gas - reason why with sand substrate, keep it low... anaerobic conditions will form forming nitrogen pockets which according to many, have killed their fish.
Bacteria shouldnt be washed away when vacuuming... think fluidised filters, according to that they will never colonized with bacteria...
i was always under the impression that many dont reccomended doing more than half in order not to shock the fish, due to changes in water chem...? Haha

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I must say, I’ve racked up some 30K posts across different forums - obviously I used to be very active. And I have a outstanding memory. I can’t recall a single thread where someone claimed that nitrogen pockets killed their fish, where there weren’t like 5 other likely causes of death. However, I CAN recall seeing people incorrectly blaming things for their problems, and then arguing with everyone trying to tell them what the real problem was - on a daily basis. Ugh, all day on a bad day. It’s even super rare to see someone make the claim. I don’t think I’d need more than one hand for that.
 
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