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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, this is my first post. I am about to set up an 100 gallon tank, and want to know how to clean it and which filter to use. It is extremely filthy and needs washing. Also, I am not sure whether to use a sponge filter, canister, or hang on filter. Please help me, thanks.
 

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Water changes with gravel vacuums is the best way to clean a filthy tank. A beefier filtration system will go a long way to keeping it clean as well.

I run 2 canisters on my larger tanks - 55 and up. Each one is capable of filtering the tank on their own. Some will say that that is unnecessary, and they would be correct....from a water quality standpoint. However, I ask more of my filtration systems than merely maintaining water quality. My filtration systems also have to provide a circular flow in the tank, which is achieved by setting them up in opposition to one another. One pushes water along the front of the tank towards the seconds intake, and the second pushes water back along the back of the tank, towards the first's intake. In my experience the fish prefer such circulation. The other advantage of this is waste collection. Since setting up my tanks this way, I never see waste on the sand - keeps the tanks spotless. Another benefit, which boxercrazy mentioned, is that the filters don't need to be cleaned very often. The smaller the system, the more often it needs to be cleaned. I don't clean mine more than twice a year. And lastly, is redundancy, though that's really an afterthought for me. People say to run 2 heaters, that way in case one fails there is a backup. I don't see how this principle does not extend to filters.

Is a 2 canister setup ideal for every tank? No, of course not. Can many tanks benefit from such a setup? Yes, absolutely. It's up to each fish keeper to determine what's best for them, based on their needs and what they want to get out of it.
 

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Plus another advantage to 2 cannisters is that you only clean one at a time not both together which is good for you biological system since one of them has the biological bacteria undisturbed
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I moved these last five posts out of the original thread in which they were posted and started a new thread of its own. While the subject was related, being filtration, the two issues from two different members are distinct and will be better served separated.

To your filter question: what fish are intended for this tank? Some aquarists incorrectly assume all fish will be fine with any filter, but this is not the case. Also, if you intend live plants has a bearing.

There is actually some detriment to too much filtration, or more correctly stated, to having too many/large filters on the tank. A filter can only do the job it was designed for, and provided the filter is adequate for the task (tank volume, fish load, etc) you will not gain anything by having more filters. You will waste your money buying them (they are not inexpensive) and you will waste money running them; but depending upon the fish, they (the fish) may be adversely affected and this means stress which is poor health.

Byron.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Byron for the insight. I just bought a Aquaclear power tank from amazon rated at 110 gallons. I own a 100 gal tank and will raise Blue tilapia (~ the size of a crappie, 5 pounds). I assume what the tank is rated for can be applied (a filter rated for 100 gal can be used on a 100 gal tank). will this filter, along with a 500 watt heater be enough for a few adult 12 inch long fish?
 

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Thanks Byron for the insight. I just bought a Aquaclear power tank from amazon rated at 110 gallons. I own a 100 gal tank and will raise Blue tilapia (~ the size of a crappie, 5 pounds). I assume what the tank is rated for can be applied (a filter rated for 100 gal can be used on a 100 gal tank). will this filter, along with a 500 watt heater be enough for a few adult 12 inch long fish?
This is a situation where you do want a bit more filtration than what you would need with small fish and planted tanks. But beyond this, I can't offer much because I have never gone down this road, so I will leave it to our "large fish" experts to provide more pertinent information. I never guess.;-)

Byron.
 

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It's funny how each forum has their own distinct collective opinion on what's best about such things.

In my opinion, an AC110 will not be enough for your tank.
 

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I am assuming this is a used tank or one that has been collecting dust and you want to know how to proceed to clean it.
First, use a vacumn to pull out as much dirt as you can. If you have hard deposits on the glass, then use a scraping tool with a metal blade to remove it. Keep the tool wet when scraping. Be careful how you scrape or you will scratch the glass. If the tank is acrylic, then someone will have to advise on how to remove hard deposits.
afterwhich, use clean water and a sponge and wipe down the glass. After cleaning you can sanitize the aquarium with 3% hydrogen peroxide. Fill the tank and add 15 ml of hydrogen peroxide for every 8 gallons. That would come to 188 ml. For the best effect, add the hydrogen peroxide at night and when the lights in the room are out. Now run your filter for 72 hours. Aferwhich all of the peroxide will be converted to oxygen and water. I recommend dumping the water as it will be easier to add the substrate when the tank is empty. Be sure to rinse it well before adding.
Do you know about water conditioning such as chlorine, chloramine and heavy metals removal?
Let us know how you plan to add livestock and/or plants and we can advise on how to proceed.
 

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A filter can only do the job it was designed for, and provided the filter is adequate for the task (tank volume, fish load, etc) you will not gain anything by having more filters. You will waste your money buying them (they are not inexpensive) and you will waste money running them; but depending upon the fish, they (the fish) may be adversely affected and this means stress which is poor health.
I don't ask my filters to do anything they aren't intended to do. I haven't always had my tanks set up in that fashion - had I not seen a benefit with the first one, I would not have wasted my money converting the rest of them. Yes, there are inexpensive canister filters - the OP could have picked up a huge canister that holds at least 3 times the media of the AC110 for the same price. As I clearly stated, such a setup is not for every application. As it turns out, it would be for the OP. In my opinion. But, I have no interest in swimming against the current so I won't advise anyone to waste their money again.
 

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I think what Byron meant is that the extra canisters = extra water flow. Some fish do fine with lot's of water flow, and enjoy it as it replicates their natural environment (such as a river or stream). However, some of us keep fish that are used to stagnant pools and still water (I do, I keep Harlequin Rasboras, Kuhli Loaches, and Pearl Gourami) and these fish greatly dislike any water current. I have one canister on my tank, rated for my tank size, and even the current from the one bothers my fish if it isn't aimed at the back wall.
 

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I keep those fish as well.
 

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It is possible to get "clean" and "clear" mixed up when it comes to filtration. The more media the water passes through, technically speaking the clearer it should be. But this is not the same as clean water.

Filtration should be suited to the fish species, and also depends upon live plants. The more plants, the less filtration (by filters) is required, since the latter will compete with the plants to their detriment. And plants perform the "clean" aspect very well if allowed to do so without interference. It is possible to have an extremely healthy aquarium with no filter at all, if there are sufficient live plants and the fish load is in balance to the plants and the water volume.

As for the fish, one has to consider the current which can be detrimental as jentrala pointed out. Aside from this, one has to also consider the size of fish in relation to the water volume. As I mentioned in a previous post, with large fish or a higher ratio of fish to water volume, more filtration is advisable. Live plants are usually minimal or non-existent in such aquaria, so the filtration needs to be sufficient.

The point I was trying to make earlier is that many of us used to be told that in every aquarium more filtration is better, but this is certainly not the case. But each aquarium has to be considered on its own, since all these factors play into the equation.

The water flow through the filter itself also is important; if it is too fast, the filter cannot perform an adequate job of filtration.

Byron.
 

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I plan to fill the tank with Blue Tilapia that i will then eat. thanks for the tips
My gut reaction is that that's a bad idea. I know many meds have warning labels on them not to be used on food fish, or something to that effect. Hopefully you'll not have to medicate. I don't know... Perhaps someone else will have more to say about it.
 

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I certainly do agree with this. Fish in an aquarium carry all sorts of pathogens. Commerciall fish farms deal with these. I would not risk eating anything in an aquarium. TB is only one disease that can be passed to humans from aquarium fish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
How do i prevent these diseases. I have to grow tilapia in a tank for my proffesor. also, i will not eat the brood stock. i will only eat the children once they grow to full size, if they show no signs of infection.
 

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How do i prevent these diseases. I have to grow tilapia in a tank for my proffesor. also, i will not eat the brood stock. i will only eat the children once they grow to full size, if they show no signs of infection.
I cannot answer this, I have never raised food fish. All I am going to say is, never eat aquarium fish.
 

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We have a tilapia farm near us for raising fish as food, but I don't personally know how they are raised. Most fish that I've seen in aquaponics (growing fish for human consumption) are kept in man made pools with floating plants and fed stuff like duckweed and chopped up fish. I'm by no means an expert, but they're usually kept outside in those blue pools you can buy at Walmart. There are a bunch of tutorials online, especially YouTube.
 
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