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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I am new to the whole fish thing but I think it's really neat! Anyways I wanna do this right and I researched a little so I know you have to cycle it and stuff but besides that what kind of fish could I get? I can go buy a heater and everything but how many fish and what kinds would you guys reccomend? I don't want to mess this up so all advice is appreciated!
Thanks!
 

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Let me start by saying you are doing it correctly and caution saves a lot of trouble and money in the end.

There are any number of fish that can go in a 10gal. Let me start what Can't go in the tank: goldfish, cichlids, african cichlids, plecos, most types of fish marked as sharks-they are not really sharks-non-dwarf gouramis, larger tetras and barbs , mollys or swordtails or exotics like knife fish.

What can go in a 10gal: Guppys, platys, Endlers, small tetras like neons or lemons, small rasboras like harlaquins, small barbs like cherry or gold barbs, Pigmy or 1 dwarf gourami (Dwarf gourami will really limit what else you can have) bettas, shrimp, cory cats or maybe a dwarf crayfish if you don't have corys or loaches.

Best bet, look at the pet store or go to aquabid and look at different fish. Put a list together of things you're interested in or like and then ask people here to help you build a stock list. We can help with the aquascaping if need be. Please keep in mind, my list of Dos and Don'ts is not all inclusive. I just tried to stick with the pet store stuff.
 

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There are a number of combinations, so it depends on what you are looking for.

The first thing that I would do, is buy a water testing kit (if you don't have one already) and check your tap water. I am on well water, which runs through a culligan water softner/filtration system - put my pH levels are higher than typical water (so, fishies who require lower pH don't fare well in my tank).

The best thing I ever did for my tank was add plants. A lightly planted tank (depending on your lighting conditions) can really help balance your miniature ecosystem.

Also, keep in mind you can always upgrade your filter to help your tank's filtration capacity. I have a 20 gallon and have 6 tropical fish, which seems like plenty to me in that space.

www.aqadvisor.com is a great resource
 

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You have just had some great responses by the two Posters above me.

My suggestion of neon tetras has already been made. You will not go wrong making a tetra tank with a few fish.

Neon, and Lemon tetras are great fish.

I have found Neon tetras as a school to be a very pretty fish, and they are fairly hardy.

If you go with a "community tank" try to get a small catfish for the bottom of the tank.
 

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Start with a fishless cycle, ammonia & a liquid test kit will be the first things needed. While the tank is cycling you'll have plenty of time to ask questions, research fish, ask more questions, and basically have a good time hanging out here & yakking with fishkeepers.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the input! I'm a little over whelmed with the testing, I'm not quite sure I understand.. I don't even know where to start to ask questions.

As far as fish go though I like the idea of a community tank. If I get a small catfish and some tetras could I also get platys or is that overstocking?
 

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^^ everyones covered it :-D
i just wanna say hello and welcome :mrgreen:
 

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Back in the '60's the book primarily used was "Exotic Aquarium Fishes" by Dr. William Innes. Ideas were so much different back then compared to today. He actually suggested 31 small fish in a 10 Gallon aquarium! I'm looking at it right now. Today, they are overly conservative as to how many fsh one should have in a tank.

Start by only putting 2-3 fish in at a time, and add a couple like every week. Do the bag instructions that your local pet store tells you when you get the fish.

I think Dr. Innes as an expert sort of got carried away! I think that it would be fine to put 4 small tetras, 4 platys and 2 small Corydoras, (or small Catfish), in your tank over a period of a few weeks. A fish per gallon should be OK. Plays come in all colors, a Wagtail Platy looks nice, Lemon/Black Skirt/Neon are all nice fish for tetras and and there are a number of nice looking Corydoras one can get. Start with plastic plants and try real plants later on. Get little stuff to make the landscape right...do your own creation! Have fun!

Bettas might look nice, but some can have stranger personalities with small fish in a community tank.
 

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I have that book! It's propping up the busted leg on the dog couch in the basement.
 

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Hi Fishie,

It all depends on how much money you want to spend. A test kit will run you $30.00, the fish I mentioned will run you $12.00.

Wouldn't hurt to buy a test kit, but personally, I would rather get the savings to buy the busted leg on the dog couch.

...but don't get me wrong, it probably is a good thing to be a water chemical expert.
 

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Hi Fishie,

It all depends on how much money you want to spend. A test kit will run you $30.00, the fish I mentioned will run you $12.00.

Wouldn't hurt to buy a test kit, but personally, I would rather get the savings to buy the busted leg on the dog couch.

...but don't get me wrong, it probably is a good thing to be a water chemical expert.
No savings at all since you forgot to factor in the cost of replacement fish that will be likely be needed since water parameters aren't ever known. Sorry, but a test kit is a must have for every aquarium owner, especially new ones that have said they are trying to do things right. You don't have to be a "water chemical expert" to understand your tank's parameters, just responsible.
 

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I have that book! It's propping up the busted leg on the dog couch in the basement.
that made me laugh..:lol:
 

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test kits...
i have one...the API master liquid one...and honestly it's worth every penny,
as looking at water.....well it looks....like water....but you don't know what's
going on in there,and it can help stop a disaster before it strikes.
i'm cycling mine at the moment ,and without my test kit,i wouldn't know where i am.
i didn't have one when i first started out..and my goodness i lost a lot of fish :-(
 
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Wouldn't hurt to buy a test kit, but personally, I would rather get the savings to buy the busted leg on the dog couch.

...but don't get me wrong, it probably is a good thing to be a water chemical expert.
:roll: Really?
Do you cycle your tank(s) do you know about the nitrogen cycle? Or would you recommend this person wanting to know how properly start a tank to guess at whats going on with their water? a test kit for 1 tank lasts a long time and is valuable to keeping fish alive as you know your water is safe and is proper for what type of fish or if in early stages of the tank if it's in dire need of a WC.

Thats ignoring all the knowledge and research gained in the last 20-40 yrs of fish keeping. To each their own -_-
 

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Hi Fishie,


Wouldn't hurt to buy a test kit, but personally, I would rather get the savings to buy the busted leg on the dog couch.
Dogs said forget the couch, spend the cash on treats.

It may be $12 in fish now, could be more expensive stocking later. On the cheap, find a shop that does the tests for free or a minimal charge, and write down the numbers. While the test kits are good to have for measuring trends as long as you do a bit of record keeping they aren't close to laboratory grade. You can get the ammonia test for $5 online, probably costs a buck to make, so it's real similar in quality to a kid's chemistry set.

If ever in doubt change water, and double dose with a good water conditioner such as Seachem Prime or Tetra Aquasafe. I get water delivered to my tap for $7 per 1000 gallons, cheap & easy prevention for a multitude of issues.
 

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I have some fishkeeping books that my mom dug up from the 70's - some of the things I read in there dropped my jaw!

It's true that this hobby can be as easy or as difficult as you choose to make it. You don't have to be a scientist to play with water tests - I actually think it's fun! ^_^ Like you said, FishieLuver - neat stuff!

Personally, I'd recommend that anyone entering the hobby with an intent to do it right should go ahead and get a kit, too. By coming to a better understanding of the water, you'll be able to come to a more complete understanding of the animals you keep and their needs. I don't think anyone can deny that's a good thing!

This is fantastic advice advice for anyone:

If ever in doubt change water, and double dose with a good water conditioner such as Seachem Prime or Tetra Aquasafe.
And then, when the fish are safe, I'd do some tests on the water I pulled from the tank in the hopes of understanding what the problem was - so I could prevent it the next time!

Another good thing to know about your water before getting fish is if you have hard or soft water. Not all water is created equal - and to a fish? It is THE most important thing!
 

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Sry, 2 males, sometimes they don't watch their language, foul little creatures.
 

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Thanks for all the input! I'm a little over whelmed with the testing, I'm not quite sure I understand.. I don't even know where to start to ask questions.

As far as fish go though I like the idea of a community tank. If I get a small catfish and some tetras could I also get platys or is that overstocking?
Back on topic, guys!
 
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