is this an old wive's tale? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 11 Old 09-09-2018, 10:12 PM Thread Starter
is this an old wive's tale?

I'm new here and this is my third post already. If it's not in the correct area, I trust that a moderator will move it. Anytime that I buy more the 5 fish for my 36 gallon planted aquarium, I'm usually told that I shouldn't add more than 5 fish at a time. Here is where I think that idea comes from and why I think it can be ignored. Most people know that there is beneficial bacteria in a cycled aquarium that breaks down fish waste, uneaten food, etc. If you add more than 5 fish, the additional waste can be more than the bacteria can handle and deadly ammonia will result. If I add 8 or 10 relatively small fish, I add an appropriate amount of beneficial bacteria. The product I use is BIO-SPIRA. My ammonia level stays at zero and I don't lose any fish.
Den Socling is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 Old 09-10-2018, 06:25 PM
Member
 
I think you are partly correct. The other part many be acclimation. The fish stress when they are moved. For many people more than 5 fish means more than one species. New place and weird neighbors wandering around the yard would more than double the stress for me..
couger is offline  
post #3 of 11 Old 09-10-2018, 06:35 PM Thread Starter
I turn the light off, float the bags a long time and add a little aquarium water at a time. I try to acclimate as gently as possible. But I understand what you are saying.
Den Socling is offline  
 
post #4 of 11 Old 09-11-2018, 10:38 AM
Member
 
Well it certainly sound likes a good policy. except for schooling fish that need one or more than four to prevent pecking order fighting.


FWIW in a plant tank, the ammonia created is consumed directly by the plants with a possible nitrate spike instead. When aerobic bacteria builds up, nitrates drop to unmeasureable levels. that combined with a few days of not adding food should help prevent the cycle problems.




my .02

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: https://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
beaslbob is offline  
post #5 of 11 Old 09-11-2018, 11:37 PM
Member
 
jaysee's Avatar
 
The beneficial bacteria colonies are among the slowest growing bacterias, taking 24 hours to double in size.

Thereís nothing special about 5 fish. Whatís important to consider is the current bioload of the tank and the bioload of the new fish being added. If your existing bioload is greater than the bioload of the new fish being added, then youíre in the clear (assuming your filter is large enough to allow the bacteria to grow sufficiently large). If you are adding a higher bioload than the inhabitants of the tank, youíre going to be in some trouble.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

125 - BGK, chanchito cichlid, pictus cats, silver dollars, palmas bichir
125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
90 - Congo tetras, african knife, upside down cats, spotted ctenopoma, kribensis, delhezzi bichir
2.5 - betta
jaysee is offline  
post #6 of 11 Old 09-12-2018, 08:48 AM Thread Starter
Is ammonia always and definitely an indication that an excessive bioload has been added?
Den Socling is offline  
post #7 of 11 Old 09-12-2018, 12:03 PM
Member
 
jaysee's Avatar
 
is this an old wive's tale?

The presence of ammonia indicates that the bioload has overpowered the bacteria colony. Often thatís a temporary situation that we call a mini cycle. However, if your filtration capacity is at maximum capacity meaning thereís no room for additional bacteria growth, then the ammonia problem is systemic.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

125 - BGK, chanchito cichlid, pictus cats, silver dollars, palmas bichir
125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
90 - Congo tetras, african knife, upside down cats, spotted ctenopoma, kribensis, delhezzi bichir
2.5 - betta
jaysee is offline  
post #8 of 11 Old 09-12-2018, 10:13 PM Thread Starter
I know very little about this subject so please explain how "thereís no room for additional bacteria growth".

Products like BIO-SPIRA claim to instantly boost the bio-filter. Is there some situation where they can't do so?
Den Socling is offline  
post #9 of 11 Old 09-12-2018, 10:34 PM
Member
 
jaysee's Avatar
 
The bacteria physically attaches itself to the surfaces inside the tank and inside the filter. Letís just consider the filter. So, because there is a finite amount of surface area inside the filter, there is a limit to the size of the bacteria colony it can sustain. Earlier I mentioned the filter being at capacity - what that means is that all available surfaces are colonized in order to handle the bioload. What THAT means is adding additional fish would result in chronic ammonia problems. How does one fix that problem? By adding more real estate for the bacteria to colonize i.e. adding a second filter, or reducing the bioload to a level below the systems threshold.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

125 - BGK, chanchito cichlid, pictus cats, silver dollars, palmas bichir
125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
90 - Congo tetras, african knife, upside down cats, spotted ctenopoma, kribensis, delhezzi bichir
2.5 - betta
jaysee is offline  
post #10 of 11 Old 09-12-2018, 10:43 PM Thread Starter
I have an AquaClear model 50 on a 36 gallon aquarium. Shouldn't that be sufficient?

After the initial start-up months ago, ammonia is always zero regardless of how many fish I add but I always add BIO-SPIRA with new fish and water changes.
Den Socling is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
a fish tale > croaking catfish catfishtabbi Freshwater and Tropical Fish 3 01-27-2009 08:31 PM
crown tale and female betta breeding kevinoh33 Fish Breeding 6 01-05-2008 11:18 AM
A tale of 2 tanks fish_4_all Beginner Planted Aquarium 13 12-27-2006 01:30 PM
help fish angelfishes tale joeshmoe Cichlids 2 09-25-2006 06:03 PM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome