My fish keep dying one by one - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 49 Old 03-05-2018, 07:20 PM
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My fish keep dying one by one

Bob do you really think a pH of 6.5, with the live plants that are in the tank, with only a few neons in the tank, is deadly??

125 - BGK, chanchito cichlid, pictus cats, silver dollars, palmas bichir
125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
90 - Congo tetras, african knife, upside down cats, spotted ctenopoma, kribensis, delhezzi bichir
2.5 - betta
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post #12 of 49 Old 03-05-2018, 11:24 PM
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I'm hopping out of this tank! I know you'll remember me..

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post #13 of 49 Old 03-06-2018, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaysee View Post
Bob do you really think a pH of 6.5, with the live plants that are in the tank, with only a few neons in the tank, is deadly??
Yep.


plants recently added. Fish are stressed.


Once the pH goes up, the fish will revive.


my .02

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: https://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
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post #14 of 49 Old 03-08-2018, 01:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beaslbob View Post
low pH means high co2. Could be a symptom of why the fish are lifeless.


I would add live plants to consume the co2 and return oxygen.


my .02


Edit: neons can be difficult to keep. Try a male platy and soo what happens.
Low pH CAN be a sign of low co2. Acids lower pH, and co2 reacts with water to make carbonic acid.
However, it's still misinformation, pH is a multitude of things. To worry about co2 levels is asinine.

My wager is also that the tank is cycled- assuming it's been at least a week (you mention a water change two days ago), and ammonia and nitrites are 0, with some nitrates present, your tank is cycled.


I wouldn't stock anything immediately. My concern is a disease. My best guess would be internal parasites. Did you mention that all your fish are lethargic, or just the neon?
A single neon very well may be lethargic because its stressed out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaysee View Post
Bob do you really think a pH of 6.5, with the live plants that are in the tank, with only a few neons in the tank, is deadly??
It's very much not. It's perfectly fine.

Last edited by redchigh; 03-08-2018 at 01:11 AM.
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post #15 of 49 Old 03-08-2018, 01:29 AM Thread Starter
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I had ten neon and ten of the orange, larger tetra. The neon all died at the same time pretty much and the larger ones died at a rate of one every couple days. However I'm down to four now and they have all survived for four days now. They also seem to be swimming round a bit more than they did before. I'm hoping I've turned a corner.

Did a load of research and neon tetra disease fits all of the symptoms. I thought they had swim bladder which is also the same as early symptoms of tetra disease and the dead fish were pretty white instead of orange. I'm hoping that the remaining ones are clear now.

I'm moving away from tetra because of the high percentage of ill ones in shops and going onto guppies. Not sure how long to leave it before in introduce new fish though. It has been four days since the last death.
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post #16 of 49 Old 03-08-2018, 02:07 AM
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Decidedly returned to the drink!

I took another look at your image.

Looks like you have some good substrate in there!
I'd definitely vote "yes" for a re-stocking..


I don't love my substrate, but it is ok for now!
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post #17 of 49 Old 03-08-2018, 07:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redchigh View Post
Low pH CAN be a sign of low co2. Acids lower pH, and co2 reacts with water to make carbonic acid.

However, it's still misinformation, pH is a multitude of things. To worry about co2 levels is asinine.



My wager is also that the tank is cycled- assuming it's been at least a week (you mention a water change two days ago), and ammonia and nitrites are 0, with some nitrates present, your tank is cycled.





I wouldn't stock anything immediately. My concern is a disease. My best guess would be internal parasites. Did you mention that all your fish are lethargic, or just the neon?

A single neon very well may be lethargic because its stressed out.







It's very much not. It's perfectly fine.


Bob is FULL of misinformation. Fear mongering is a staple of his - probably the worst lie he tells people is that using products like prime is deadly to the fish. Seen that one more times than I can count. Why does he do it?? In hopes of finding himself a little protege to follow his “method”. Where are the pictures of these awesome tanks of his?? Non existent. Been asking for pics for years.

125 - BGK, chanchito cichlid, pictus cats, silver dollars, palmas bichir
125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
90 - Congo tetras, african knife, upside down cats, spotted ctenopoma, kribensis, delhezzi bichir
2.5 - betta
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post #18 of 49 Old 03-08-2018, 02:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redchigh View Post
Low pH CAN be a sign of low co2. Acids lower pH, and co2 reacts with water to make carbonic acid.
However, it's still misinformation, pH is a multitude of things. To worry about co2 levels is asinine.
Here is the relationship between pH and co2 per Dr randy Holmes-Farley in the article
Quote:
Originally Posted by http://www.reefedition.com/ph-and-the-reef-aquarium/
Carbon Dioxide and pH
The pH in a marine aquarium is intimately tied to the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in the water and to its alkalinity. The reason that carbon dioxide impacts pH is because when it enters the water, it rapidly turns into carbonic acid. Acids lower pH, so more carbon dioxide means more carbonic acid, which means lower pH.
If seawater is fully aerated with normal air (that is, it is in full equilibrium with the air), then its pH is exactly determined by its carbonate alkalinity: the higher the alkalinity, the higher the pH. There is, in fact, a simple mathematical relationship between alkalinity, pH and carbon dioxide that I have discussed previously. Figure 2 shows this relationship graphically for seawater equilibrated with normal air (350 ppm carbon dioxide), and equilibrated with air having extra carbon dioxide, as might be present in certain homes (1000 ppm) or when the carbon dioxide is deficient (as may happen in aquaria using limewater, also known as kalkwasser). Understanding the overall relationship between carbon dioxide, alkalinity and pH (Figure 2) is a key principle in solving most pH problems encountered in coral reef aquaria.

Figure 2. The relationship between alkalinity and pH in seawater with normal carbon dioxide levels (black), excess carbon dioxide (purple) and deficient carbon dioxide (blue). The green area represents normal seawater.

then same exact relationship is valid for freshwater as well. In a Fw or marine tank pH can reasonable be thought of as a function of KH and co2 only.


You increase the co2 (co2 addition for planted tanks, co2 for calcium reactors for marine systems) pH decreases. You decrease CO2 (plant action) pH increases.


I am unaware of any instance in a fully balanced functioning aquarium where low pH and low CO2 exists. Even during cycling the pH is low and co2 high.


As I stated before the fish can suffocate with high co2 values in addition to ammonia.


IMHO the best way to solve either and/or both is to add live, fast growing plants to consume both.

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: https://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
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post #19 of 49 Old 03-08-2018, 02:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaysee View Post
Bob is FULL of misinformation. Fear mongering is a staple of his - probably the worst lie he tells people is that using products like prime is deadly to the fish.
...


Waiting for your response.




my .02


ps Who's fearing mongering? LOL

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: https://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
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post #20 of 49 Old 03-08-2018, 04:14 PM
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My fish keep dying one by one

You bob - you’re fear mongering. Almost every time you post. This time you are trying to make the OP think that the fish suffocated, based on NOTHING other than a single pH reading at a single point in time. Because the fish exhibited symptoms consistent with that, AND A DOZEN OTHER THINGS?? The only time you ever post on this forum is when you see an opportunity to scare people by taking a kernel of truth and twisting and distorting it until it suits YOUR needs, because any time you post it’s purely self serving. I can’t even begin to count how many times you’ve completely ignored everything the OP said, to post your copy and paste response fishing for a sucker to follow your “method”. As was mentioned earlier, completely asinine.

125 - BGK, chanchito cichlid, pictus cats, silver dollars, palmas bichir
125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
90 - Congo tetras, african knife, upside down cats, spotted ctenopoma, kribensis, delhezzi bichir
2.5 - betta
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