29 g tank - compatibility - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 7 Old 06-01-2016, 01:49 PM Thread Starter
New Member
 
29 g tank - compatibility

Hi!

I'm a newbie and I hope to get some advice!

I bought a 105 liter tank, with stones on the bottom. I haven't found the ammonia yet here (I live in Aruba), I hope I can start the cycling process soon. First reading about me made me very confused, but hopefully I'll manage by following the steps.

I have a few questions:

1. Which and how many plants would you advice?

2. How often should I do the water change (when I have my fish) and how much?

3. I bought the conditioner, salt, how often do I use it and is there anything else I need?

4. To decorate what rocks/wood could I use? Is driftwood okay for example?

5. Then the fun part, choosing my fish.

I want to have cherry barbs, I read that a group of 6 would be best, how many males and females would you advice?

I really love the dwarfs and the honey gouramis, from what I understood two honey gouramis would be better (more calm etc)? One male one female?

Which other fish could I add? I like colorful fish for example the mollies, hatchetfish, kuli loach. Other suggestions are welcome too!
I want to have a balanced, healthy aquarium, colorful and alive but the fish have to have enough space too, so I'm not too sure about the amount of fish I could have either..

Measurements:
Length 76,5 cm
Width 31,5 cm
Hight 47,5 cm

Sorry for all the questions, just trying to do it right and think it through!
Melaniepu is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 7 Old 06-01-2016, 04:20 PM
Welcome to the fishkeeping world! We will gladly help you!
1) It really depends on the species you want. I personally LOVE Anubias. I have always loved the way it looks and it grows well in my tank. But definitely research it to see if it is compatible with the tank setup you have in mind.
2) One week 25%, maybe more depending on the species
3) Use water conditioner in every water change and as for the salt, assuming it's AQ, it depends on the species
4) It also depends on the species, if you want long-finned species I recommend live or silk so they don't damage fins, stuff like that. Driftwood is okay but be sure to learn how to clean it first
5) I have never had experience with those except for mollies, which I love. They are very fun to keep and enjoy exploring the tank. To figure out how many fish you can have, use the inch per gallon rule. For every inch of fish, have at least one gallon for it. Be sure to take into account the fish growing and how much room the decor takes up. Hope this helps and welcome!

Hope to help u along your unique journey!
-Superswimmer

PM me for the link to my website!
superswimmer is offline  
post #3 of 7 Old 06-03-2016, 11:07 PM
Member
 
aussieJJDude's Avatar
 
Aquarium
@superswimmer , the inch per gallon rule is so outdated IMO. They really only work well for smaller fish like neons, cardinals and micro/nano fish.

1. Which and how many plants would you advice?
I suggest low light plants. Java fern, anubias, cryptocoryne, mosses (java, christmas, flame, fissidens ect.) should do well in a beginner setup. Even species like valls, rotala and swords will do well if you provide fertilizers - the ones listed before (^^^) should be fine without ferts.
2. How often should I do the water change (when I have my fish) and how much?
Depends on the stocking. A nice stocked tank should be around 25-30%. I personally to 50% weekly on my tanks, but each to their own. water changes help reduce harmful substances (like ammonia) and help restore balance (like minerals). Its worth remembering that in the wild, the fish would have close to 100% water changes daily!
3. I bought the conditioner, salt, how often do I use it and is there anything else I need?
Most of the time, the conditioner is used every time you have a water change. So weekly. As for salt, I have no idea. I personally don't like to use it - they freshwater fish - and many fish (like kuhli loaches) don't respond well to salt in there tank. So if you do add kuhlis, no salt. Plus some plants don't like salt as well. Research wisely to ensure the fish/plants you add will be ok with/without salt.
However salt is great if you need to medicate a sick fish (in a seperate tank) that has fungus or an infection.
4. To decorate what rocks/wood could I use? Is driftwood okay for example?
Unless you're a geologist, a beginner should stick with the rocks and wood from your local fish shop (LFS). The LFS should have a large quantity to choose from to suit your taste and be inert (IE: doesn't alter the water). (Stay away from anything that is used for african cichlids). Of course, the materials you purchase should be washed to remove harmful residues.
Wood has the habit of releasing tannins, which can be beneficial for most fish. The bad thing is that it makes your water look a tea brown, so prior soaking may be necessary. (Plus wood has the habit of floating, so soaking should your wood from floating)
5. Then the fun part, choosing my fish.
The stock that you mentioned look great! Plus with a school of 6-8 kuhlis would look nice! But kuhlis are a nocturnal fish so you may not see them out a lot. However if theres a lot of hiding places (like plants, rocks, wood) they more likely to come out during the day. But most activity will occur at night, so its recommended to feed them before you turn off the lights. Even adding a few more (1-3) of the cherries could be alright with larger water changes (closer to 30-35% weekly).

Owner of fish, hermit crabs, shrimp and plants!


Hermit Crab Association (HCA) is a great resource for hermit crab care
aussieJJDude is offline  
 
post #4 of 7 Old 06-04-2016, 09:46 PM
If you are starting out, check out "forums" "reference materials" and choose posts "from beginning". It is an excellent reference source for plants and fish. It helped me when I first started into researching tropical fish. And if you have a nearby fish store, check out what they usually carry and then look up them in the reference section. AussieJJDude has some good ideas and I also don't use salt because they are freshwater fish (I have cories and tetras). Just a word on cryptocorynes...I love them, but they do require an established tank (I suggest a tank that has been running for at least 6 months) or they will die on you. They don't like new tanks but are easy to care for once the tank has been running for a while. A planted tank is easier to maintain for your fish health. Again, check out what is available to you and then look them up on the reference forum to get a good idea of what the plant looks like and what it needs.

And driftwood can make your water brownish (I never had this happen) but isn't permanent. Just rinse beforehand.
brownmane is offline  
post #5 of 7 Old 06-04-2016, 11:30 PM
@aussieJJDude why would you say that? I agree that it isn't perfect but I mentioned to think about growing and the new volume of the tank with decorations, gravel, filter, heater, etc.

Hope to help u along your unique journey!
-Superswimmer

PM me for the link to my website!
superswimmer is offline  
post #6 of 7 Old 06-05-2016, 01:00 AM
Member
 
aussieJJDude's Avatar
 
Aquarium
Quote:
Originally Posted by superswimmer View Post
@aussieJJDude why would you say that? I agree that it isn't perfect but I mentioned to think about growing and the new volume of the tank with decorations, gravel, filter, heater, etc.
Because the inch per gallon rule was "invented" and commonly used during the 80's, 90's & early 2000's. its not something that is advocated much - except in LFS - and personally, can understand why. If you were the compare a nice thin, small fish (let's just say the kuhli loach) and compare it with a bulky, small fish (something of a similar size to a kuhli, dwarf cichlids) the dwarf cichlid is likely to produce a larger amount of waste and take up more space than one single kuhli! I prefer to go by eye and the size of the actual tank (surface area). According to the inch per gallon rule I'll be able to keep an oscar in a 20g tall tank!
Maybe I was a bit too harsh, the inch per gallon rule is ok but there's a large "grey area" that should be taken into account when stocking a tank.

Owner of fish, hermit crabs, shrimp and plants!


Hermit Crab Association (HCA) is a great resource for hermit crab care
aussieJJDude is offline  
post #7 of 7 Old 06-05-2016, 02:06 AM
@aussieJJDude
I definitely agree, but from the species they mentioned they wanted I considered those "small fish" that would fit in their tank fine. I only said that to give them a ball park of what they could do with the species they suggested. Had they said an Oscar or Fantail or something that is generally messier or very active, I would explain things differently, but I see what you are saying.

Hope to help u along your unique journey!
-Superswimmer

PM me for the link to my website!
superswimmer is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tank set up compatibility concerns ScAreCroW Freshwater and Tropical Fish 3 11-12-2013 07:30 PM
community fish tank compatibility Toasterbaa Freshwater and Tropical Fish 11 07-13-2013 11:00 AM
Compatibility and overstocking in a tank SaveGoal Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 11 01-14-2013 05:48 PM
Fish Compatibility in a 120litre tank migdem Freshwater and Tropical Fish 4 09-10-2009 03:33 AM
tetra tank compatibility beetlebz Characins 3 09-10-2007 09:47 PM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome