calcuim??? Help
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calcuim??? Help

This is a discussion on calcuim??? Help within the Water Chemistry forums, part of the Advanced Saltwater Discussion category; --> I need some direction here. I have 33 gallon salt water tank. Sitting for about 2.5 weeks. So far what I have in it ...

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Old 09-29-2008, 07:15 PM   #1
 
calcuim??? Help

I need some direction here.
I have 33 gallon salt water tank. Sitting for about 2.5 weeks.
So far what I have in it is...
crushed coral
14 lbs of fiji live rock that is cured
2 hermit crabs
a skimmer
2 power heads (opposite sides of each other)
and a Aqua Clear filter 300 ( just the foam).

Now, the store I got all my supplies from told me that
I couldn't put any fish into the tank for at least 4 weeks if not longer. (?)
He also had never mentioned any thing about testing for calcuim. And this is where I am not quite clear . Is there a test kit for this? What does calcuim do in saltwater?
The other thing that I have read about is putting the carbon bag in my filter. I can honestly say I am confused about this as well.
Can some one direct me in the right direction on these matters.
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Old 09-29-2008, 08:40 PM   #2
 
I would Calcium is not as important as FO/FOWLR as reef. Calcium is the Main food of LPS and Soft corals, and it declines in tanks. You need a steady level of about 400-450ppm (?) to have the best growth. Yes, there is a test kit.

And, I wouldn't add a fish until the tank is at least 2.5 months old, if not older. 4 weeks is very young, and I would only be adding CUC then, which should be after your cycle. Do you know what your current water parameters are?
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Old 09-30-2008, 01:17 AM   #3
 
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Calcium is one of the major ions in natural seawater. Besides the four primary ions (Chloride, Sodium, Sulfate, and Magnesium) Calcium is the most prevalent of the major ions in seawater. Although there are a vast number of organisms that are reliant on, or use calcium, it's primary focus is in reefkeeping and on that of it's relationship with the bicarbonate ions. Most Corals in reef aquaria use up these two ions to deposit Calcium Carbonate Skeletons or Spicules (depending on the coral). As such, these ions are rapidly depleted in reef aquariums and must be monitored and supplemented. Calcium test kits are common and should be available in any LFS that carries SW test kits. Additionally, and especially if you are seeking to keep live corals, you will need to monitor your Alkalinity (Kh) levels. These levels are not only crucial to the health of your corals, but also to the development and proliferation of Coralline algae.

Calcium should be in the range of 380 - 450 ppm
Alkalinity should be maintained in the range of 8 - 11 dkh.

If you are keeping corals, you will inevitably begin pushing those levels to supersaturation, thus making Magnesium another necessary focal point. But thats a whole different topic.

As Cody indicated, Take it slow. Don't rush fish into your tank. I know it's frustrating to sit idly by, watching an empty tank, but both the fish, and your wallet will suffer greatly from impatience in this side of the hobby. Better to take your time and do it right. Get your tank properly established so that your fish (and inverts) can live a long, happy and healthy life.

Carbon helps to remove organic pollutants, stains, and toxic gases from the water. Some people use it consistently, some people use it sporadically, and some don't use it at all. The key to using carbon is to remember that it must be replaced frequently. Personally, I dont use it at all, but I have considered A one month dose implemented each quarter just to see if there is any noticeable difference.
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Old 09-30-2008, 08:13 AM   #4
 
My water temp is at 78.
How long does it take to cycle?Can you explain more on this area. My water seems to be good in the Nitrate (which is at 0 right now)& Ammonia (which is at 0 right now) department.

Cody,I am pretty good at computer lingo but you got me on CUC? (cute unidentifiable creature)lol
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Old 09-30-2008, 11:07 AM   #5
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walkytalky
Cody, I am pretty good at computer lingo but you got me on CUC? (cute unidentifiable creature)lol
Clean Up Crew
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Old 09-30-2008, 03:28 PM   #6
 
Thank you for clarifing that for me.
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Old 10-01-2008, 10:14 AM   #7
 
k I took your advice.
I went to the pet store and got my calcuim and PH checked. My calcuim was low and the PH was fine. So I got the calcuim supplement. But now my tank is a bit cloudy. Why?
I also got 3 more blue hermit crabs. Which are eating like crazy.
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Old 10-01-2008, 11:35 AM   #8
 
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I'm not a saltwater tank expert, but my chemistry knowledge tells me that if you added a calcium supplement and now you have cloudy water, you likely overdosed the calcium and now you're getting precipitate. I wouldn't think it's anything to worry about though, as I believe a lot of reefkeepers keep calcium levels high enough that they have some precipitate out.
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Old 10-01-2008, 02:45 PM   #9
 
I thought I might have. I don't have a calcium test kit here. I will eventually buy one. But in the mean time I will bring it to the store to get tested (its cheaper that way hehe)
thanks
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Old 10-01-2008, 05:35 PM   #10
 
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It's never a good idea to dose without testing. Are you planning to keep corals? If so, I would recommend a balanced 2 part additive like B-ionic or C-balance. Test and monitor Calcium, alkalinity, and magnesium. There is a well defined explanation to the relationship of these three ions here:

A Simplified Guide to the Relationship Between
Calcium, Alkalinity, Magnesium and pH


Understanding this relationship is very beneficial to your success in reefkeeping. In Fish-Only systems, this relationship is also very relevant, however the use of these ions is not nearly as great.
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