zit/cyst on cory's dorsal - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Tropical Fish Diseases » zit/cyst on cory's dorsal

zit/cyst on cory's dorsal

This is a discussion on zit/cyst on cory's dorsal within the Tropical Fish Diseases forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Wow, what a battle. I do know from reading that UV sterilizers can help with a lot of bacterial infections. They can also help ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Black Phantom Tetra
Black Phantom Tetra
Emerald Catfish
Emerald Catfish
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
zit/cyst on cory's dorsal
Old 12-27-2009, 11:13 PM   #11
 
Mean Harri's Avatar
 
Wow, what a battle. I do know from reading that UV sterilizers can help with a lot of bacterial infections. They can also help with fish TB in that the TB weakens the immune system making the fish more susceptible to other diseases. And the UV sterilizer can kill these bacteria that would otherwise infect a fish with a weakened immune system.

Fish TB is a huge problem. Or at least was. I did some reading from 2006 information. I do not know if things in the industry have improved since then or not. Google "Diana's diseased fish" those 3 words. lots of good reading.
Mean Harri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2010, 06:07 PM   #12
 
FrogHerder's Avatar
 
Thanks for the link, Harri.

Good reading. Fish keeping sure has changed since I was a kid. Kept Bettas, Cories, Crawdads, and what have you with no problems other than the occasional fish jumping out of a cup during major tank cleanings.

The Cory still has the small white lesion on his nose. We found some tetracyclene in gel-food form at another LFS. It's a broad-spectrum drug, and supposed to be effective at killing mycobacteria. Hopefully he will eat it. Have had no luck whatsoever finding Kanmycin (sp?) locally. We're going to keep treating him with antibiotics for probably another couple weeks. At that point, the hospital tank will probably become a hospice tank for him and the harlequin rasbora with the bloat problem. We'll add a little soft sand and probably a plant, and try to make them comfortable as possible. Will keep some clove-oil on hand in case it looks like they're obviously suffering. Who knows, if we quit doing 50% WC every other day, and give him some soft sand and real food, the Cory's little nose just might heal by itself? (I can hope, right?)

We have treated the other tank with the healthy fish and frogs aggressively with antibiotics for a couple weeks, and none of them are showing signs of illness. We purchased a new 20g long aquarium for these. The tank is set up, and we are waiting for the BB to build up (doing a fishless cycle) before we transfer them over. We wanted a bigger tank, as we were concerned that crowding may have played a role in the fish getting sick. The expense of the new aquarium along with the cost of the medications for the sick fish has us pretty well tapped-out. If we do get a UV sterilizer, it will have to wait a couple months.

If everything keeps dying off, we will probably just go scorched-earth, bleach-bomb EVERYTHING and start over. Sometimes that's the way things go in life. Will be MUCH more particular in the future about where we buy fish from. As an aside - there is a seahorse breeder (forgot the name) that has their operation certified as SPF ("Specifically Pathogen Free") for mycobacteria marinum. Will have to check around to see if I can locate fish breeders who also go the extra mile. The peace of mind would be well worth paying double or triple the price for healthy stock.
FrogHerder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2010, 10:41 PM   #13
 
FrogHerder's Avatar
 
Located an excellent paper on M. marinum published by Iowa State University.

http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/Factshe...um_marinum.pdf
FrogHerder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2010, 07:02 AM   #14
 
FrogHerder's Avatar
 
Got a UV sterilizer for the new tank. Got some christmas money from a relative, and were able to afford it. They really don't make anything small enough for the hospital tank.
FrogHerder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2010, 01:28 AM   #15
 
FrogHerder's Avatar
 
Apparently I like talking to myself.

Anyway - treated the Cory for 3 weeks with erithromycin and Jungle antibacterial food. The cyst went away quickly and has not returned. That area on his dorsal now looks completely normal. The white spot on its nose is still there. The rasbora is doing great. No outward signs of illness. Slightly pudgy - and has been the entire 3 months we've had it. Obvious bloat is gone.

As the white spot is still there despite the antibiotics, we're going to treat it as fungal for now. Added play sand to the bottom of the hospital tank. The cory seems soooooo happy to have something to root around in. I'm hoping it will help debride/heal the area and may help with working the meds into the wound. Treating with API antifungal (the tank water looks like gatorade, but the fish seems fine with it).

A little about myself - I have a degree in biology and worked for the fisheries dept of our state wildlife agency when I was in school. Unfortunately, most of my experience involves electroshock surveys and Whirling Disease inventories in the wild. Not helpful to mister cory cat. I know a little about diseases and how to recognize them but - I AM NOT A VET.

Feeling really helpless right now - I've always felt very responsible for any animals I bring into my home. Would anyone with good experience/expertise dealing with sick tropicals be willing to chime in?
FrogHerder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2010, 06:06 PM   #16
 
Byron's Avatar
 
I've read this thread, but as I have extremely minimal knowledge of disease issues I tend not to get involved and leave it for those who have such knowledge, and there are several here who do but perhaps over the holidays they haven't been active online.

My comment is for the future to keep your cory healthy; he needs some companions. I realize this is a 6g tank, but corydoras are shoaling fish and very social; 3 would be ideal. And if you keep up good maintenance I would sooner have 2 more corys than not. And being heavily-planted is a bonus; plants are incredible water filters.

I really do recommend two more Corydoras aeneus, or another species if you'd prefer variety, as corys generally shoal together when different species. Make sure they are Corydoras aeneus and not Brochis splendens, a fish that looks almost identical but grows larger. You have Corydoras aeneus if it looks like the fish in the original photo; the dorsal fin has 7 rays as all Corydoras have, whereas Brochis splendens has 10-12 rays.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2010, 11:00 PM   #17
 
FrogHerder's Avatar
 
Thx for the advice on keeping more than one cory. Byron. The hospital tank is just a 2 gal. Our betta now calls the 6 gal home. Was just given a moderately neglected 40 gal (whole nother story :P) and that is where cory cat will end up if/when we're reasonably sure he's not a danger to make the other residents sick. There is already one other cory there (unsure of the sp.) and plans to add more.

A little tough to count because he's moving around so much now, but I broke out a magnifying glass, and the fish appears to have 8 dorsal rays (branched), not counting the barb at the leading edge. Is it a mutant?

I looked at some pictures of aeneus, and he does appear to be one (other than the extra ray). So I was mistakenly calling it an emerald cory, when apparently it is a bronze cory? They can take in oxygen through their intestines? Wow. Saw some bubbling action at the vent a few days back, and just assumed it was flatulence . I guess there's a chance that 'he' is a 'she'. How does one sex them (other than breeding behavior)?

Anyway, the lesion appears to be getting better. Another 48 hrs left on the antifungal treatment and then maybe-hopefully done throwing meds at him.

Last edited by FrogHerder; 01-11-2010 at 11:08 PM..
FrogHerder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2010, 03:48 PM   #18
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrogHerder View Post
Thx for the advice on keeping more than one cory. Byron. The hospital tank is just a 2 gal. Our betta now calls the 6 gal home. Was just given a moderately neglected 40 gal (whole nother story :P) and that is where cory cat will end up if/when we're reasonably sure he's not a danger to make the other residents sick. There is already one other cory there (unsure of the sp.) and plans to add more.

A little tough to count because he's moving around so much now, but I broke out a magnifying glass, and the fish appears to have 8 dorsal rays (branched), not counting the barb at the leading edge. Is it a mutant?

I looked at some pictures of aeneus, and he does appear to be one (other than the extra ray). So I was mistakenly calling it an emerald cory, when apparently it is a bronze cory? They can take in oxygen through their intestines? Wow. Saw some bubbling action at the vent a few days back, and just assumed it was flatulence . I guess there's a chance that 'he' is a 'she'. How does one sex them (other than breeding behavior)?

Anyway, the lesion appears to be getting better. Another 48 hrs left on the antifungal treatment and then maybe-hopefully done throwing meds at him.
I went back to Burgess to check this out, and he writes that Corydoras have 6-8 rays in the dorsal. The three Brochis species have 10-17, with B. splendens having 10-12 which is the fewest of the Brochis species. Brochis are usually obvious, the dorsal fin extends a fair length along the dorsal ridge and the last ray is very close to the adipose fin quite unlike the Corydoras.

Common names can be very misleading. Corydoras aeneus is seen in stores as bronze cory, green cory, emerald cory, "cory", etc. Always know what you're buying. Good fish stores usually have reference books on hand, and if they do won't mind you looking up something you see and don't know about. I've a tremendous interest in South American fish, especially characins and the Callichthyidae (Aspidoras, Brochis and Corydoras) but I still see fish I don't know especially now that collectors are entering remote areas previously un-fished and finding new species that sometimes get to the store before they are named. I have a group of characins in my 115g that to my knowledge have not yet been scientifically described and named. They appear to be a species of Hyphessobrycon or Hemigrammus; they came direct to one of my local stores from the collector in Peru who happened to find them and decided to export some.

I have only been able to sex mature Corydoras by the girth of the female which is quite obvious. Sometimes spawning or pre-spawning behaviour is a clue, the way the male positions himself crosswise in front of the female. To my knowledge there are no external sex differences in colour or pattern. Glaser says that the pectoral fin ray of the male is thicker when viewed from above.

The ability/need to "breathe" air is quite remarkable. All species in the Callichthyidae (and many other catfish too, like otos) must periodically and regularly swallow a gulp of air which then passes to the hind gut where blood vessels take up oxygen before the air is expelled. If the fish is prevented from doing this, say by a tank with a glass cover at the water surface so no air is available, the fish will literally drown. Similar to the anabantids with their labyrinth organ. There are clear biological reasons for these adaptations. The Callichthyidae are able to live in oxygen-poor water and some even in basically mud because of this feature. Nature is remarkable.

Byron.

Last edited by Byron; 01-12-2010 at 04:43 PM..
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2010, 10:08 AM   #19
 
FrogHerder's Avatar
 
Thought for sure we had killed the cory with kindness yesterday. The API Fungus Cure turned the water a special shade of radioactive green, and the little guy seemed to be wearing down from all the meds. Wasn't really eating much, and while I wouldn't say its fins were exactly 'clamped' they weren't splayed in the usual manner either. Very sluggish and did not eat a bloodworm that was offered. Overall, the fish just seemed depressed and I thought there was about a 50/50 chance it would go belly-up overnight.

Did a 50% wc last night, and put a filter cartridge with some carbon in. Woke up to some very encouraging signs. The white patch on the cory's nose is GONE. It's behavior is also much better. Positively pigged-out at feeding time this morning. Back to being the same hyperactive, expressive little fish we brought home 3 mos ago. The only thing left 'wrong' is a very small amount of erosion on the lower half of its tail fin. That has been there unchanged for 5 weeks, and may have been there the entire time we've had the fish.

The carbon seems to have neutralized most of what meds were left in the tank after the wc. Going to keep 'Blinky' the cory, and his (her?) buddy the harlequin rasbora in the QT (and continue 50% wc every other day) for at least another week or two and watch very closely for any sign of sickness. My gut feeling now is that this was not a myco infection, but something else. I realize that could be wishful thinking, which is why the fish will be staying in QT for now without meds and observed very closely.
FrogHerder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2010, 01:04 PM   #20
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrogHerder View Post
Thought for sure we had killed the cory with kindness yesterday. The API Fungus Cure turned the water a special shade of radioactive green, and the little guy seemed to be wearing down from all the meds. Wasn't really eating much, and while I wouldn't say its fins were exactly 'clamped' they weren't splayed in the usual manner either. Very sluggish and did not eat a bloodworm that was offered. Overall, the fish just seemed depressed and I thought there was about a 50/50 chance it would go belly-up overnight.

Did a 50% wc last night, and put a filter cartridge with some carbon in. Woke up to some very encouraging signs. The white patch on the cory's nose is GONE. It's behavior is also much better. Positively pigged-out at feeding time this morning. Back to being the same hyperactive, expressive little fish we brought home 3 mos ago. The only thing left 'wrong' is a very small amount of erosion on the lower half of its tail fin. That has been there unchanged for 5 weeks, and may have been there the entire time we've had the fish.

The carbon seems to have neutralized most of what meds were left in the tank after the wc. Going to keep 'Blinky' the cory, and his (her?) buddy the harlequin rasbora in the QT (and continue 50% wc every other day) for at least another week or two and watch very closely for any sign of sickness. My gut feeling now is that this was not a myco infection, but something else. I realize that could be wishful thinking, which is why the fish will be staying in QT for now without meds and observed very closely.
Some good actions noted here, well done. Keeping in QT is fine, and without any medication is very sensible with Corydoras, as I'll explain momentarily; connected to this is the fact that the pwc almost certainly saved the cory's life.

I have learned from experience over 15 years that Corydoras are extremely sensitive fish to chemicals, salt, medications, water parameter changes and water quality problems. Characins as a group are probably second in line, but Corydoras are at the top of the list. I no longer treat aquaria containing Corydoras unless it seems absolutely essential to save the fish. I have observed the exact same reactions in corys as you describe, from several different medications; the first sign has always been very increased respiration, then eratic movement, then sluggishness to the point of death. When treatment is deemed essential, I now observe the corys and am ready to do a major pwc every day if necessary.

The green is likely malachite green and/or acriflavin, both highly toxic to these fish if prolonged or in strong dosage. As for the tail fin, it may grow back; torn and missing fins usually do, though not always.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cory's Shara Catfish 14 11-02-2009 07:29 PM
Is this fin rot, or just a cut dorsal fin on my Juruopari? CoolHandLu Tropical Fish Diseases 3 08-13-2008 07:59 PM
Help ID my cory's please bullseye69 Catfish 12 09-01-2007 01:14 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:53 AM.