When to euthinize? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

 
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post #1 of 9 Old 01-09-2008, 08:38 AM Thread Starter
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When to euthinize?

I have a white cloud that has been at a 45 degree head up angle while fighting to keep himself off the bottom the last couple of days. There are no obvious external signs of disease. Do you leave this fish alone to try to recover or remove him from the tank so he doesn't harm the other fish?
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post #2 of 9 Old 01-09-2008, 01:02 PM
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It sounds as if your fish may be having swim bladder issues, and this is not always fatal. There are ways to treat it, but first I'd need to know the details of your tank?
Size of the tank?
How long it's been set up and running?
Water params for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pH?
Temp?
What fish and how many are in the tank?
Live plants?
Type of filter?
How often you feed? Types of food?
How often you do water changes and how much water at a time?

Dawn Moneyhan
Aquatics Specialist/Nutritionist
Juneau, WI
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post #3 of 9 Old 01-09-2008, 01:04 PM
The thing with euthenizing is after is done there is no turning back. Finality in its rudest form. Putting done any animal, should be done when there is no cure and the creature is in distress. Those should be the only criteria. To adopt a wait and see attitude only prolongs the agony. If you feel that those criteria have been met, do what needs to be done as quickly and as humanely as possible. Your white cloud has given you a time of enjoyment. In death, he should be treated with respect and gratitude for those times, a thank you of sorts.
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post #4 of 9 Old 01-09-2008, 02:12 PM Thread Starter
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[quote="bettababy"]It sounds as if your fish may be having swim bladder issues, and this is not always fatal. There are ways to treat it, but first I'd need to know the details of your tank?
quote]

The tank is a ten gallon set up for about 8 months now with a Marineland power filter. It has 5 white cloud and 3 cory with 2 java fern, 2 anubis and 1 val. It is kept at 76 degrees, 25% water changes every two weeks and feeding twice a day ( flake in the am, pellets in the pm). Water parameters are good every time I have them checked.
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post #5 of 9 Old 01-09-2008, 02:20 PM
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Can you please post results for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, and pH? One person's idea of good may mean a whole different thing to someone else. Sometimes watching for "good" isn't enough and it's more balance that needs to be seen. Some readings will directly affect others, such as high nitrates will drop pH... or ammonia and nitrates reading in any amount at the same time indicates a problem with waste build up. The other reason I ask for exact numbers is because some medications can have an adverse affect if any trace of ammonia or nitrite is present, or nitrates over 40. I have a wide range of medications to select from, based on active ingredients, but without knowing the exact water params, I wouldn't know which one is safest.

Dawn Moneyhan
Aquatics Specialist/Nutritionist
Juneau, WI
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post #6 of 9 Old 01-09-2008, 02:24 PM Thread Starter
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I'll have to get the water tested to get new numbers. Is there anything I shouldn't do in the mean time?
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post #7 of 9 Old 01-09-2008, 02:31 PM
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For me it is when a fish can not be a fish.

My worst example:
I had a male betta that for some reason got every fin on his body completely ripped off overnight. And I mean every fin. When I firstlooked at him I thought it is over, this fish will never survive and I need to euthanize it. The thought stayed in my head all day but when I fed the fish he was still able to get to the food and even flared at the other fish just like he used to. To me this meant the fish was more than strong enough to make it if I treated him. I treated him and he was fine after about 6 weeks of waddling rather than swimming while his fins grew back.

If the symptoms we very sudden and not gradual then MAYBE the fish is at the end of his time. If it was gradual, and even if not, we need to know your tank paramemters before you lose even more fish.
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post #8 of 9 Old 01-09-2008, 04:03 PM
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I'm looking into what medications are going to be best, but I won't make a suggestion until I know water params. In the mean time, add 1 tablespoon of marine or aquarium salt, or a teaspoon of epsom salts to the tank water. If you can pour it near where the fish is sitting, if the fish eats some of it, even better. Do not premix the salt into water to dissolve it first. Doing so would defeat the purpose and the chemical reaction caused by mixing it that way can be dangerous to the entire aquarium.

Dawn Moneyhan
Aquatics Specialist/Nutritionist
Juneau, WI
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post #9 of 9 Old 01-14-2008, 09:47 AM Thread Starter
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The little guy didn't make it past the weekend though he tried a few times to swim around. Just for informational purposes, my water parameters were PH 6.9/Ammonia 0/Nitrites 0/Nitrates 32ppm before doing the biweekly water change. I did the water change after he was out of the tank.
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