Salt - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 12-01-2007, 07:25 AM Thread Starter
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Salt

Alright, I have questions about SALT in fresh water tanks. So I figured I wasn't the only one and would help answer for others. Hopefully this will get populated and become a sticky.


Aquarium Pharmaceuticals Doc Wellfish's Fresh Water Aquarium Salt
A small amount of this all-natural “salt” for freshwater fish will reduce electrolyte loss caused by disease and stress, and promote healthy gill function. It does not evaporate and is not filtered out. Also ideal for Goldfish bowls.

Here is a resource for the salt at about.com:
http://freshaquarium.about.com/cs/tr...ltiinfresh.htm

From above resource:
When To Use Salt
Nitrite Poisoning - The addition of one half ounce of salt per gallon of water is beneficial in the prevention of nitrite poisoning in a newly set up tank.

Keep in mind that scaleless fish cannot tolerate much, if any, salt. Parasites – Many parasites can be effectively treated with the use of salt, particularly Costia infestations.

When Not To Use Salt
Live plants - If you have a tank with live plants, avoid using salt. Plants can be damaged with a relatively low dosage of salt, which is one reason its best to treat sick fish in a hospital tank rather than your regular tank.
Scaleless fish – Scaleless fish, particularly cordydoras, are very sensitive to salt. Even a small amount could harm them. Tetras are also fairly sensitive to salt. Contrary to popular view, it is not advisable to add salt to your aquarium on an ongoing basis unless the fish require brackish water conditions.

Performing a Dip (How To: Dissolving the Salt)
When treating parasites, a dip is the method of choice. Place 4 teaspoons of salt in a clean bucket, then slowly add one gallon of water from the aquarium, swirling it to dissolve the salt. Once the salt is completely dissolved, place the fish in the bucket for five to thirty minutes. Observe the fish closely, and if it exhibits any signs of distress, return it to the original aquarium immediately.

Performing a Bath
A bath is useful in treating an entire tank for prevention of nitrite poisoning, or for reduction of stress.

For stress treatment, measure out 1 teaspoon of salt for each gallon if water in the tank. Using a small container, dissolve the salt in a small quantity of water taken from the tank. Once it is completely dissolved, slowly add the solution to the to the tank.

For treatment and prevention of nitrite poisoning, measure out 3 teaspoon of salt for each gallon if water in the tank. Using a small container, dissolve the salt in a small quantity of water taken from the tank. Once it is completely dissolved, slowly add the solution to the to the tank.
When using bath treatments, weekly water changes of 25% should begin one week after initial treatment. Do not add additional salt once bath treatments have begun.
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post #2 of 9 Old 12-01-2007, 10:03 AM
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Hi Verbosity.

That's a nice write-up. Besides, we can't be repeating most instructions so this deserves to be stick.

Feel free to post more of your opinions, people.:)

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post #3 of 9 Old 12-01-2007, 10:05 AM
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Moved to a more appropriate section.

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post #4 of 9 Old 12-06-2007, 02:47 PM
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so i shouldnt add any salt to my tank? i have danios, corys and a betta, and the betta has ich, i have the proper medication from the other stickys, but wasnt sure if the salt would be safe. i could have hurt my poor little corys!

gotta love threads like this.
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post #5 of 9 Old 12-11-2007, 08:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rustyness
so i shouldnt add any salt to my tank? i have danios, corys and a betta, and the betta has ich, i have the proper medication from the other stickys, but wasnt sure if the salt would be safe. i could have hurt my poor little corys!

gotta love threads like this.
Salt is fine for those fish with the possible exception of the corydoras.

On another note, I am not a fan of aquarium salt for something less expensive such as table salt. It's your choice. Either way, table salt is still cheaper. Why people worry about the iodine content is beyond me.

The information posted above still has its validity but aquarium salt is just in my opinion a waste of money when you have something less expensive sitting around your table.

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post #6 of 9 Old 12-11-2007, 08:03 PM
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Re: Salt

Quote:
Originally Posted by verbosity
Contrary to popular view, it is not advisable to add salt to your aquarium on an ongoing basis unless the fish require brackish water conditions.
I just took notice of this after a quick skimming a few days ago. Marine salt is the option here, not aquarium salt.

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post #7 of 9 Old 01-16-2008, 08:50 PM
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personally i think marine salt works the best.
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post #8 of 9 Old 08-02-2009, 08:06 PM
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Question Epsom salt vs aquarium salt

I hear that epsom salt does not contain sodium which is harmful to fish that are bloated and trying to relieve pressure due too much sodium. Is that correct? I really am confused on the issue of salt, on the one hand it is very good for the gills and for healing (which is what i need) but on the other i don't want to increase the bloating discomfort if sodium really is the cause. Any help would be appreciated!
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post #9 of 9 Old 08-23-2009, 07:08 PM
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The box said 1 TBSP for every 5 US gallons. I'm trying to get rid of Hydra's. Is this dosage fine?

I'm a spaz...
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