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one dead, another on the verge

This is a discussion on one dead, another on the verge within the Tropical Fish Diseases forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by molliefan09 IMHO, i would not use any of the above mentioned...i would just use PRIME it helps convert ammonia into ammonium ...

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one dead, another on the verge
Old 11-08-2009, 11:04 AM   #21
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by molliefan09 View Post
IMHO, i would not use any of the above mentioned...i would just use PRIME it helps convert ammonia into ammonium and it is also a dechlorinator and also helps with the slimcoat of the fish....i was using stresscoat + and wwas having issues with somethings and switched to PRIME and i have been fine ever since.....i swear by this product and it has never affected my ph/gh/kh and all my fish are happy and healthy
Worst way of keeping fish, depending on chemicals which is only short term relief when we can use the concept of bio-activity as it happens in nature, a long term relief.
By understanding a bit on water chemistry, can omit/eliminate suc unncessary additves/chemical.s Waste of your hard earned MONEy.
Virtually ammonia (NH3) is negligible with very shophisticated testing equipment at pH of 6.2. Pretty much all of it is in the form of Ammonium (NH4+). So why use such addtives when its already in NH4+?

Fish have ability to produce slime of their own. No need for extra slime.
When too much of these added slime are used, it can hamper the respiratory/excretory functions (deadly as fish will drown/die from its own waste).
I have not touch a single bottle of dechlorinator after understanding how I could dechlorinate (I was teen then, some 40 yrs ago).
I am not saying others to not use dechlorinator but to point out why use additives unnecessarily!!!

Last edited by cerianthus; 11-08-2009 at 11:07 AM..
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Old 11-08-2009, 04:13 PM   #22
 
Thanks everyone

Quote:
Originally Posted by cerianthus View Post
Worst way of keeping fish, depending on chemicals which is only short term relief when we can use the concept of bio-activity as it happens in nature, a long term relief.
Hi cerianthus, I see your point. I am looking at this long term however, and I do completely understand the issues with "over-involvment" with your tank: Too much work on the owner's part than necessary, and fish go through unnecessary shock.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cerianthus View Post
I have not touch a single bottle of dechlorinator after understanding how I could dechlorinate (I was teen then, some 40 yrs ago).
I am not saying others to not use dechlorinator but to point out why use additives unnecessarily!!!
Bear in mind that coastal Florida water is very alkaline due to the large amount of chlorine we used to treat our water. It wouldn't surprise me in the least that the local tap water's pH is close to 8.0. One of my roommates used to work for the water treatment plant at West Melbourne Florida, and the amount of chlorine they use is staggering. Dechlorinator is a must here in Florida. I also use activated carbon in my filter, so the filter also helps with dechlorinating the water...but treatment with Amquel+ or something of the like is necessary down here for aquarium hobbyists.

The reason I am concerned about the pH is because the effectiveness of the nitrifying bacteria decreases with the drop in pH. Anything less than <6.2 in pH really affects the bacteria's ability. I really would like to keep the pH around 6.8 if possible. I have ordered some crushed coral and will put a small amount of them in the tank to see if that helps at all. As for the substrate, I don't think I'm going to replace that anytime soon. The tank is not that big, and currently ammonia is not a problem.

In the future when I move to a bigger place, I'll probably get a 20 gallon tank and get a small freshwater community, and use the Biorb as a medical tank.

Currently I'm keeping track of the water and putting a small amount of SeaChem Reef Buffer to keep the pH at constant 6.8 (very little dose goes a VERY long way, 1/10 of a tsp twice a day). I'll keep doing this until the crushed corals arrives. The KH value in the tank is still very low, hopefully that will change as well with the corals.

Thanks everyone for your invaluable advice. This was my first community aquarium, and I've learned a lot on what not to do.

Regards, Theresa
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