Newbie running into MAJOR problems... - Page 6 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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post #51 of 73 Old 05-11-2009, 06:17 PM Thread Starter
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Normal?! Yay! Do you think the increase in nitrites will hit the BGK or the angel particularly hard? Is there anything we can do to help? Thanks!
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post #52 of 73 Old 05-11-2009, 07:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Cheknnudol View Post
Normal?! Yay! Do you think the increase in nitrites will hit the BGK or the angel particularly hard? Is there anything we can do to help? Thanks!
Any fish will be hard hit under the circumstances. You made the choice to put both of them in the tank that was not cycled, which in my personal opinion was not a wise decision considering all the advice several of us previously gave in 5 pages of posts. Dose the tank with "Cycle" to ease the stress and wait it out.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #53 of 73 Old 05-11-2009, 11:20 PM Thread Starter
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I realize it was less than ideal. The BGK was an obvious bad decision but I guess we had a weak moment. The angelfish on the other hand was more of a safety measure, as several of you also warned against having him in such a small tank, let alone one that was not cycled. I think that six fish to 50 gallons with a great filter is a much better scenario than a fish and a frog to 3 gallons with a not so great filter, particularly when neither option involved a non-cycled tank. We got ourselves into a yucky predicament in the first place both with tanks and with the number of fish we acquired (BGK being the irresponsible exception), but are working to remedy it for the most part.

We have dosed with cycle as a precaution, though I was wondering more than anything exactly how hard the changing tank conditions would hit the BGK and Ding Dong. Considering that Ding Dong was the only fish to survive our 10 gallon tank genocide (as we've been referring to it here), he seems to be a pretty hardy fish. Is this a total fluke or could he be the Super Man of angel fish?
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post #54 of 73 Old 05-12-2009, 02:27 AM
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No one would attempt to declare EXACTLY how a particular fish would be affected. Google info on NITRITE poisoning. Also know ,, (wasn't inclined to go back through thread),, NITRITE spikes are nearly ,if not always,, Preceded by AMMONIA spikes. Both are toxic ,,and fish that survive,usually have health issues and much shorter lives as a result.

The most important medication in your fish medicine cabinet is.. Clean water.
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post #55 of 73 Old 05-19-2009, 10:39 AM Thread Starter
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Well despite obvious opposition on here to how we handled our situation, the tank seems/seemed (more on this shortly) to be nearly cycled:
(Sorry for the formatting)
Date: pH/Ammonia/Nitrite/Nitrate
5/11: 7.2/0/1/5
5/12: 7.2/0/0.75/5
5/14: 7.2/0/0.35/7.5
5/17: 7.2/0/0/7.5


HOWEVER we woke up to the ominous sound of spraying water this morning from our filter being higher than water level. This made absolutely no sense since we had just put a couple of gallons last night. That was when we saw the steady stream of water shooting from 6" down the back corner of the tank onto the wall. We got the water level down to below the leak and I write this as my boyfriend is driving to his brother's to pick up a similar-height table to slide the tank onto (it is on a piece of - albeit soaked - particle board wrapped in fabric so it's a matter of putting the tables next to each other and pushing rather hard).

We lost about 3 gallons onto the carpet so not moving the tank to clean up at this point is absolutely not an option, and 3 gallons were removed to get water level below the leak. My questions is obviously how do we fix the leak without harming the fish? I don't know anything about sealing agents or preferred ones or their affect on fish before they've set and whatnot, and I don't really feel comfortable putting our fish in our spare 20 gallon for very long. What would you guys do? Will this affect our cycling?

Last edited by Cheknnudol; 05-19-2009 at 10:46 AM.
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post #56 of 73 Old 05-19-2009, 12:30 PM
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I would take the filter from the large tank and place it on the 20 gal and fill the twenty gal with water from tank thats leaking along with the fish. Watch the water parameters in the twenty gal.and change water as needed to keep ammonia levels and nitrites at safe levels. Remove the gravel from the leaking tank and place it in a bucket of the leaking tanks water or place the gravel in nylon stockings and place this too in the twenty gal with the fish. Let the leaking area dry and use aquarium safe silicone to repair the leak. Let the repair dry for 24 hours. Then fill the tank with tapwater to see that leak is fixed. If so,, then return the water,filter,and fish from 20 gal to the repaired tank.

The most important medication in your fish medicine cabinet is.. Clean water.
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post #57 of 73 Old 05-19-2009, 01:05 PM
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oh no,how awful :(
i'd go with 1077.

when you set up a new tank,hide an extra
sponge or two behind some decor,that way you have
something seeded for you next filter.
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post #58 of 73 Old 07-14-2009, 09:32 PM Thread Starter
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2 month late update :) fixing the leak went smoothly and we also purchased a couple of little algae eater fish (Swiffer and Bissel). Things went great for a while but a week or so ago our BGK went missing :(
All this time you guys told me that he would eat our little fish but in the end it looks like they ate him. Very disappointing. D:
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post #59 of 73 Old 07-15-2009, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Cheknnudol View Post
2 month late update :) fixing the leak went smoothly and we also purchased a couple of little algae eater fish (Swiffer and Bissel). Things went great for a while but a week or so ago our BGK went missing :(
All this time you guys told me that he would eat our little fish but in the end it looks like they ate him. Very disappointing. D:
From previous posts, I'm assuming the "little fish" are zebra danios and cardinals. These would not kill a BGK. The angel might if it was full grown and the BKG was very small. What were the "algae eaters"? If ottocinclus, they would not kill a BGK. The asian "algae eater" might if it was big enough, they get 6+ inches and others have mentioned they can be rough. [ They also don't eat algae once they get larger.] It is more likely the BGK died on its own (the tank wasn't cycled, etc) and the other fish would scavenge it and it would quickly disappear. When any fish dies in an aquarium if you don't find it immediately it will not usually last long.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #60 of 73 Old 07-15-2009, 10:48 AM Thread Starter
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From what I can recall the inhabitants of the tank right now are
1x Zebra Danio
1x Swordtail Lyretail
2x Angelfish (1x veiltail)
2x Fancy Guppies
2x Otocinclus

The BGK was around 5 inches. There's nothing big enough to kill it. The problem for me is that I have no idea what WOULD have. The tank is cycled. Water tests have been superb for quite some time now. There wasn't any nipping or chasing going on between any of the fish except with the danio and the guppies. None of the other fish died. It just seems odd to me that a baby BGK would just up and die after several months of being awesome and without showing any real signs of illness or upset.
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