Frozen bloodworms a problem for Corys? - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Tropical Fish Diseases » Frozen bloodworms a problem for Corys?

Frozen bloodworms a problem for Corys?

This is a discussion on Frozen bloodworms a problem for Corys? within the Tropical Fish Diseases forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> If it is ich, yes, you treat the tank. You probably know the life cycle and why this is critical. If not, here's a ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Rainbow Shark
Rainbow Shark
Paradise Fish
Paradise Fish
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Frozen bloodworms a problem for Corys?
Old 06-11-2010, 06:01 PM   #11
 
Byron's Avatar
 
If it is ich, yes, you treat the tank. You probably know the life cycle and why this is critical. If not, here's a link to info on this issue from the Disease section:
http://redirectingat.com/?id=401X512...icles-11660%2F

If the betta is the only fish in the tank, you could isolate it to a "hospital" tank if the main tank is large; the only advantage to this is less medication. The "empty" main tank would, after two weeks, be free of ich. But if it is not a large tank, I would just treat the betta in it to avoid further stress moving it. Stress takes a real toll on fish.

I said "if" because sometimes it can be something else, and sometimes these things clear up on their own. However, given the stress to the fish due to the cycling issue, it may very well be ich. Fish that are stressed frequently come down with ich (one reason why new fish so frequently carry it).

I have cured ich several times (I see it more than one with my experience should) with Aquari-Sol. I like this product because it is less stressful on sensitive fish (such as corys if they were still alive, and characins), you don't need to fiddle with higher temperatures (though with a betta that is not an issue) and it works. The salt method also works but some fish cannot tolerate salt (corys and characins are not good candidates for salt treatments), I am not knowledgeable enough on betta to comment on salt; I know I would never use it on my anabantids, Chocolate Gourami and pygmy gourami, they are too sensitive.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2010, 08:04 PM   #12
 
bearwithfish's Avatar
 
if i may also interject some advice based on my personal experiance.... it is also possible to treat ICK with heat alon and no medications.... if you raise the temp 1 degree per day until you reach 88-89 F and then leave it there for 7 days and then slowly reduce temp by 1 degree per day until back to your normal level you will have sped up the ick life cycle and killed them all off... with out medications and with no harm to your environment.. an added benifit would be that BB will grow more rapidly during this time hastening your cycle.....
not attempting to be contrary nor am i attempting to step on anyones feet just demonstrating one way that has worked for our tanks.....
bearwithfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2010, 01:18 PM   #13
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bearwithfish View Post
if i may also interject some advice based on my personal experiance.... it is also possible to treat ICK with heat alon and no medications.... if you raise the temp 1 degree per day until you reach 88-89 F and then leave it there for 7 days and then slowly reduce temp by 1 degree per day until back to your normal level you will have sped up the ick life cycle and killed them all off... with out medications and with no harm to your environment.. an added benifit would be that BB will grow more rapidly during this time hastening your cycle.....
not attempting to be contrary nor am i attempting to step on anyones feet just demonstrating one way that has worked for our tanks.....
This remedy was mentioned in another thread, forgot when now, and it is in Mary Bailey's article on ich in the May 2010 issue of AFI. She mentions 90F as the temp for several days (until 3 days following the last visible spots she says), but warns that some fish cannot tolerate this and will die. But if the high temp is not an issue for the particular fish, this would seem to be the best method as no drugs get into the water and they cause stress for many fish.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2010, 07:25 AM   #14
 
i use jungle brand for ich. However make sure you do your water changes when you start treating for ich. It helps remove it.
AaronCombs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2010, 11:11 AM   #15
 
redchigh's Avatar
 
Well, do you have any other fish?

If you just have the Betta, you could try salt. (salt does not get along with cories, but if they're all dead...)


Ich also doesn't usually kill that fast.

With a Betta as the only fish, you could try one remedy that seems to work particularly well with Bettas...

It involves moving the fish into a new container every couple days. Ich has a three-stage life cycle-
Begins as a cyst (basically an egg.) It hatches after a couple days and looks for a host. Then it anchors to the fish and eats it's flesh. Once the parasite has had enough, it forms into a cyst and dies. Eventually the cyst falls off, and rests on the substrate until it hatches and begins the cycle anew.

So, you can use salt, or an overthecounter ich treatment...
Or just move the fish every couple days, so the cysts fall off and the fish is removed before they begin swimming again.
The parasite can only live about 1-2 days without a host.

As a side note, stress makes fish much more succeptable to ich. I had ich once, and it was all over my black mollies, and one platy- never spread beyond that.
redchigh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2010, 12:57 PM   #16
 
At the moment, all I have is the Betta and a mystery snail. I did some water changes, and stopped feeding for a few days and the fish and snail seem much happier. I've heard people describe Ich as resembling someone sprinkling salt on a fish. My Betta never looked like that. I think maybe it's just the coloring of the Betta.

I have a small Hydor heater in my tank and it doesn't have a thermostat to automatically cut off when it reaches a certain temp. I usually plug it in overnight when the house gets cooler and unplug it when I go to work. I forgot to do that the other day and left the heater plugged in. When I got home, the water was almost 85 degrees. Are Cory's generally more sensitive to hear than Bettas?
squilky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2010, 03:45 PM   #17
 
Byron's Avatar
 
I mentioned in an earlier post in this thread that corys are highly sensitive to fluctuating water parameters; temperature is a parameter, along with pH and hardness.

I don't see the cory species mentioned in your posts. A few species can manage with warmer temps long-term (Corydoras sterbai is one, and thus a good cory for tanks with discus and rams that require warm temps around 82-85). Some can tolerate higher temps short-term (a couple days). Many cannot tolerate warm temps (like 85F) at all. Aside from this, fluctuating temperatures is not going to make your fish comfortable. Even a betta may develop problems with constantly fluctuating temperatures if they are significant.

It is extremely important that fish have stability in their water parameters. I highly recommend you buy a good quality heater that will maintain a fairly constant temperature. There is some logic in having an aquarium a couple degrees cooler at night than during the day; after all, waters in the tropical rainforest usually fluctuate diurnally by a couple degrees. But this should be controlled by heaters, and the cooler temperature should be a night when the fish are resting and less active.

I would surmise that several things occurred and the corys simply could not handle it. These things all cause stress, and with fish just as with humans we know that stress affects the immune system as well as other things. The goal of each of us must be to reduce or eliminate as much stress as possible. The fish will definitely be healthier.

We have a number of fish profiles on this site: click "Tropical Fish Profiles" second from the left on the blue bar across the top of the page, or if names are used in posts they will be shaded and clicking on the name will take you to that profile. You can find out info on a fish's preferred water temperatures and other important data in the profiles of the species.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2010, 09:14 PM   #18
 
Im having trouble finding a heater small enough to fit in a 2.5 gallon tank. My tank goes down to 75 or 76 overnight, maybe I am better off just not using the heater.
Posted via Mobile Device
squilky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2010, 09:18 PM   #19
 
putting a heater in that size tank can cook your fishies...

just an FYI... even for a 2.5 gal i don't think I'd have that many fish in it.

Betta's need 1 gal alone.
AaronCombs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2010, 07:03 AM   #20
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronCombs View Post
putting a heater in that size tank can cook your fishies...

just an FYI... even for a 2.5 gal i don't think I'd have that many fish in it.

Betta's need 1 gal alone.

Well all I have in the tank now is a male Betta and a mystery snail. After I lost the 2 Cory's, I realized the tank was too small for more than that.

As far as the heater goes, the heater I bought was labeled as being specially made for small tanks under 5 gallons. So Im surprised that the temperature just keeps rising and rising. Not a very effective product at all. I didn't use the heater last night, and the water was 75 when I woke up this morning. I would expect that without the heater, the water will be about 77-78 during the day. Is this ok for a betta? Or is it too cool?
squilky is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Frozen or freeze dried bloodworms? Grimmjow Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 20 01-08-2010 11:05 PM
Bloodworms? Wallaby Freshwater and Tropical Fish 14 12-12-2008 12:45 AM
Crazie.Eddie: Do shrimps enjoy frozen bloodworms??? crazie.eddie Freshwater Journals 10 01-01-2007 03:35 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:21 AM.