Another one bites the dust...
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Another one bites the dust...

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Another one bites the dust...
Old 04-20-2012, 08:48 PM   #1
 
Another one bites the dust...

So I'm new to Tropical Fish and Aquariums in general and was looking for some insight.

I purchased a 10 gallon tank to have a small tropical aquarium. I purchased six fish to start out with, which to my understanding is extreme, especially with a new tank.

Anyway, treated the water and setup the aquarium and added the fish. Everything was fine, until the next day I noticed one of my fish had died. I can't remember the type, some neon green dollar-fish looking thingy. I figured it was because of having too many or stress, so I exchanged him for the same type.

Next day, the new one died again. Yesterday, one of my Neon Tetras died, while his friend was fine.

Today, both of my Mollies are dead, which seemed fine. And the other Tetra, and another fish (Can't remember the name, looked like a bigger Tetra)

So, I'm left with the other bigger Tetra fishy and my Dragon Scale Betta. Now, the smaller Tetra had pieces missing and the larger one had some rear fin missing. But the other fish didn't seem to show any signs of physical damage.

My question is, what should I look at as potential causes? Is the Betta fish systematically murdering my tank of fish, or is it from too much stress of a new tank with too many fish (they were swimming around fine, not frozen or hanging out at the top). Any recommendations for breeds of fish to change them for or add now or in the future?

I would really not like to have a Auschwitz Water-park for fish. I understand I wasn't nearly patent enough with the setup and preparation of the tank and ecosystem, but how can I tell if that's the reason or if I just have a bully in the tank?
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Old 04-20-2012, 09:14 PM   #2
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Apathy View Post
So I'm new to Tropical Fish and Aquariums in general and was looking for some insight.

I purchased a 10 gallon tank to have a small tropical aquarium. I purchased six fish to start out with, which to my understanding is extreme, especially with a new tank.

Anyway, treated the water and setup the aquarium and added the fish. Everything was fine, until the next day I noticed one of my fish had died. I can't remember the type, some neon green dollar-fish looking thingy. I figured it was because of having too many or stress, so I exchanged him for the same type.

Next day, the new one died again. Yesterday, one of my Neon Tetras died, while his friend was fine.

Today, both of my Mollies are dead, which seemed fine. And the other Tetra, and another fish (Can't remember the name, looked like a bigger Tetra)

So, I'm left with the other bigger Tetra fishy and my Dragon Scale Betta. Now, the smaller Tetra had pieces missing and the larger one had some rear fin missing. But the other fish didn't seem to show any signs of physical damage.

My question is, what should I look at as potential causes? Is the Betta fish systematically murdering my tank of fish, or is it from too much stress of a new tank with too many fish (they were swimming around fine, not frozen or hanging out at the top). Any recommendations for breeds of fish to change them for or add now or in the future?

I would really not like to have a Auschwitz Water-park for fish. I understand I wasn't nearly patent enough with the setup and preparation of the tank and ecosystem, but how can I tell if that's the reason or if I just have a bully in the tank?

Hello,

Sounds like you might have rushed things a little bit.. theres a link to a very helpful article all about freshwater aquarium cycling, which is an essential aspect of keeping a successful aquarium, take a look. I would post the link here but for some reason it wouldn't let me.

from my VERY limited knowledge seems like there is several possible reasons.

the first one being the water, if you literally set the tank up on day one and then added the fish... this is a no no. The tank and filter would have no way of using up the byproducts of the fish. this is all explained in the article about aquarium cycling.

water hardness is another problem, or the PH of the water even. live bearer fish like mollies prefer hard water, and the likes of neons apparently need softer more acidic water. so those two fish are not really compatible I believe.

You mention stress, there is also an extremely informative article available in the same area as the cycling one, all about stress and how stress is created and manifests itself in fish. Essential reading!

One way of helping with the first few weeks is to throw a bunch of real plants in the tank. they will help with the cycle process and also keep the water safer for the fish. Once you get some plants in there, you'll want to keep going anyway! I love the plants!

anyway, just a couple thoughts from a noob.. I hope one of the experts takes over to help you out!

Simon
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Old 04-21-2012, 07:34 AM   #3
 
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It could be many reasons including fish incompatability and aggression. Adding that many fish at once to an uncycled tank probably caused an ammonia spike which is lethal to fish. I would not add any more fish to the tank at this time until you know some basics about the tank.

Fish species that don't work with the ph out of your tap water and are not compatible with the other fish in your tank will cause mayhem as well.

Do you have a good water test kit? If not, I would suggest buying the API Freshwater master test kit. You'll need to test your water frequently at the beginning (every day) and then once a week after the tank is cycled. The kit can be a little pricey but it will last you a good long time. You can find it cheaper online but need to be testing your water now during cycling the tank.

If you can't pick one up soon, bring a sample of your tank water to your fish store and have them test for ammonia, nitrIte, nitrAte, ph. Also test the ph out of your tap water. You can use the Tropical Fish Profiles link at the top of the main page of the forum to see which types of fish will work best and how many they should be in number. You're not going to be able to keep a whole lot of them in 10 gallons. And you'll have to figure out which fish will not nip at your bettas fins and vice-versa.

In the meantime, here's the link for cycling your tank. If you can add some live plants to the tank as well, that will be helpful.

http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...m-cycle-38617/

Welcome to the forum and good luck. It takes weeks and weeks to get where you need to be initially but we're here to help :)

Last edited by Romad; 04-21-2012 at 07:39 AM..
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Old 04-22-2012, 02:30 AM   #4
 
I'll get the water checked out for any fish cyanide. I considered getting live plants, but didn't know how much work would be involved with that.

Any suggestions for an amount of fish and breeds? I want freaky neon glow in the dark fish, that don't kill each other... often.
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Old 04-22-2012, 08:09 AM   #5
 
API master test kit has been a wonder fir me, allowing me to find issues with water chemistry before the become a problem. Question though, are there any good hardness testing kits out there, cant seem to find any around here?
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Old 04-22-2012, 08:40 AM   #6
 
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API master test kit has been a wonder fir me, allowing me to find issues with water chemistry before the become a problem. Question though, are there any good hardness testing kits out there, cant seem to find any around here?
You can find info on your tap water from your local water supplier, check their website should have it somewhere on there..
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Old 04-22-2012, 10:15 AM   #7
 
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You can find info on your tap water from your local water supplier, check their website should have it somewhere on there..

Unfortunately my water is well water, I do believe it is on the hard side, I'll have to keep looking, thanks for the tip about municipal water though.
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:35 AM   #8
 
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Originally Posted by Apathy View Post
I'll get the water checked out for any fish cyanide. I considered getting live plants, but didn't know how much work would be involved with that.

Any suggestions for an amount of fish and breeds? I want freaky neon glow in the dark fish, that don't kill each other... often.
You'll have to find your ph and hardness numbers before anyone can make good suggestions.
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Old 04-22-2012, 04:18 PM   #9
 
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Originally Posted by blwoodson View Post
API master test kit has been a wonder fir me, allowing me to find issues with water chemistry before the become a problem. Question though, are there any good hardness testing kits out there, cant seem to find any around here?
API makes a GH & KH General and Carbonate hardness test kit. You may not find at your LFS, but amazon.com carries it (as well as most mail order fish supply houses).
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Old 04-24-2012, 07:43 PM   #10
 
Okay, so I just exchanged my mass grave of fish.

I added two live plants to help keep the tank healthy and tested my water. My nitrate levels are low, and my pH levels are very high and I have hard water.

I now have my Dragon Scale Betta, two Cardinal Tetras, a Ghost Catfish and a Gold Mickey. My Betta and Mickey survived the high ammonia spike but lost color and their gills seem to be damaged. The betta no longer opens his gills wide when he's trying to look pissed off and the Mickey while swimming around sometimes, usually floats towards the top and sits there. Are they permanently damaged or could they potentially heal?

How is the pH and hard water going to affect my fish? Is there anything else I should add, or use for the water? Any suggestions for fish and types?

Last edited by Apathy; 04-24-2012 at 07:53 PM..
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