1 cory died in the bag. now other corys dieing? - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 18 Old 08-22-2012, 08:54 PM Thread Starter
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ok. im actually going tomorrow. i may just call and ask my lfs if they have julii corys. i wouldnt wanna drie all the way out there and they not hae them though.
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post #12 of 18 Old 08-22-2012, 09:36 PM
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Sorry TO Hear
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post #13 of 18 Old 08-23-2012, 05:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
You mention Corydoras julii, if you have the true C. julii species, it will be wild caught; this species is quite rare. Most corys labeled as julii are in fact C. trilineatus. This species is hardier, but as far as I know is still wild caught.
Corydoras julii have been very difficult to find the last few years for some reason; I'd wager export laws have changed in their major collection areas. Corydoras trilineatus is available captive-bred now (and in fact is what I see the majority of the time when I'm doing fish orders for the store).

Ultimately there isn't a huge difference between the two. I'd much rather go with the trilineatus just for the captive-bred aspect.
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post #14 of 18 Old 08-23-2012, 06:23 PM
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Corydoras julii have been very difficult to find the last few years for some reason; I'd wager export laws have changed in their major collection areas. Corydoras trilineatus is available captive-bred now (and in fact is what I see the majority of the time when I'm doing fish orders for the store).

Ultimately there isn't a huge difference between the two. I'd much rather go with the trilineatus just for the captive-bred aspect.
ya im with wonderfulwub. the captive bred species is hardier and can substain more.

My 10 gallon
----------------
4 Zebra Danios(danio rerio)
2 Amazon Swords(Live Plants)


My 5 gallon
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1 Baby Female Betta
2 Ghost Shrimp

I will never let a pleco live with danios again.
People dont put them together.
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post #15 of 18 Old 08-23-2012, 06:54 PM
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Corydoras julii have been very difficult to find the last few years for some reason; I'd wager export laws have changed in their major collection areas.
The likely reason is given in our profile; but in addition to what is stated therein, another issue could be the flooding this year. According to one collector in Peru, where the probably source river for this species is located, this was the worst year in 20 years for either floods or drought, both of which preventing collection from several areas. [In case you're not familiar with the profiles, they are under the second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top. If the name is used identical in a post to how it is given in the profile, common or scientific, it will shade and you can click that to pop-up the profile.]

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Corydoras trilineatus is available captive-bred now (and in fact is what I see the majority of the time when I'm doing fish orders for the store).
This is worth knowing, though I will always select wild-caught over commercially-raised if given the option.

Which brings me to the comment about hardiness raised by fishlover, and to which I do not subscribe. There is plenty of evidence that in most cases, wild caught fish will be less prone to disease in the aquarium. I don't want to get into whether this is or isn't due to inbreeding of captive fish, and I don't know if this plays a part or not, though i suspect it must given the considerable weakening of the various livebearers in particular. But wild fish seem to be "healthier" which is always a good sign, and they are often more colourful. The cardinal tetra has shown this, the wild caught are more brilliant than the tank-raised now appearing.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Last edited by Byron; 08-23-2012 at 07:28 PM.
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post #16 of 18 Old 08-23-2012, 07:41 PM
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The cardinal tetra has shown this, the wild caught are more brilliant than the tank-raised now appearing.
Yes, but take it from someone who deals with cardinals on the retail level on a daily basis, wild-caught cardinals are wayyy more delicate than the captive-bred ones.
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post #17 of 18 Old 08-23-2012, 08:07 PM
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Yes, but take it from someone who deals with cardinals on the retail level on a daily basis, wild-caught cardinals are wayyy more delicate than the captive-bred ones.
It may depend upon what one means by "delicate." It would take some fairly controlled experimentation to determine that tank-raised are more resistant to disease. And in general, wild fish are stronger in this respect. If it is a case of lifespan, then that comes down to the water parameters. Given soft acidic water, wild cardinals will easily live beyond 10 years. I'd be interested in any evidence showing that harder water is less detrimental to tank-raised cardinals.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #18 of 18 Old 08-24-2012, 07:47 AM
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In my personal experience (your mileage may vary), wild cardinals have a higher mortality rate in our water than the captive bred ones. That's with a pH of 6.5~, hardness around 4, and temperature of 82~ (for our cardinal/rummynose tanks, that is).

I'm not saying it's because captive-bred fish somehow have a stronger immune system or that they're stronger against parasites/diseases, but they tend to have traveled far less and gotten a healthier start in life. Stress kills fish, that's a fact, and (properly) captive-bred fish are (in my opinion and experience) healthier for it, which is why I tend to gravitate towards and recommend CB fish over wild-caught.
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