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Fish Not Suitable for Beginners

This is a discussion on Fish Not Suitable for Beginners within the Saltwater Fish forums, part of the Saltwater Fish and Coral Reef Tanks category; --> Cleaner wrasse - typically(95% easy) will starve in a normal aquarium. Need to be in a large tank with an abundance of large fish. ...

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Fish Not Suitable for Beginners
Old 01-27-2010, 11:55 AM   #11
 
Cleaner wrasse- typically(95% easy) will starve in a normal aquarium. Need to be in a large tank with an abundance of large fish. +removal from the reefs is causing issues there too more than any other fish I have read research on.
Seahorses/Pipefish- definately not a beginners fish or at least a fish for new tanks. Pretty much need a dedicated system.
Orange Spotted Filefish- Wont eat prepared food in almost every case(Unless you consider SPS corals prepared food).
Fu Man Chu Lionfish- very difficult to get to eat prepared food.
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Old 01-27-2010, 08:27 PM   #12
 
Guess we cant edit on this forum. Pasfer reminded me of a different fish and reasons why.
Catalina Goby
and appearently Citron Goby-- Both of which are cold water fish and wont last long in reef tank temps
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Old 09-30-2010, 06:41 AM   #13
 
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Thank you guys for this list. This will really help me since I'm a newbie.
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Old 01-17-2012, 06:18 PM   #14
 
lionfish

I totally disagree with lionfish being hard to keep, my first saltwater fish (besides a couple of damsals to cycle tank) was a volitan lionfish (still have it) they are notoriously easy to keep in a saltwater and reef aquarium i have mine in a reef right now, i can assure you they do not pay any attention to the coral, the only thing they will eat are any fish/some inverts that are smaller than there mouths .I do admit they are a little hard to get eating at first but all you have to do is get about a 4 feeder goldfish and right when you drop the fish in it should instantly want it.Then soon after ween it on frozen kill to keep it healthy.

i would recommend this fish to anyone that owns a saltwater aquarium for three reasons:

1-they are one of the most beautiful fish to keep in a saltwater aquarium
2-easy to care for-they are pretty much prone to ich/other sicknesses because every time they get sick with a parasite/disease they will shed their skin taking the parasite off their body
3-They are venomous which makes this fish species very cool to keep in your home!
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Old 01-17-2012, 06:27 PM   #15
 
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i would not feed a saltwater fish goldfish. i suggest silversies, live feeder shrimp, blackworms, fish eggs, high quality pellets or flakes, pre-rinsed frozen foods. a large mixture of foods if possible to offer maximum nutrition.
id avoid offering live fish if possible, but saltwater converted mollies would prob. be a better choice then goldfish. just my opinion.
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Old 01-17-2012, 06:30 PM   #16
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bispinosa View Post
I'm not sure I'd be too quick to warn people away from all butterflyfish. I have a 3-inch Raccoon Butterflyfish right now in a fairly young tank (2 months, I believe, when I added him) and he's a happy-looking, active fish that gets his share during feeding time. I just have to make sure I put in bits of frozen food small enough for him, but brine shrimp, spirulina-enhanced brine, and mysis all work. Never used live food. He comes right to the surface without fail.

Of course, it's possible that the addition of my three longfin bannerfish, which are related to the butterflies and are supposedly hardy, had something to do with it; he often hangs around them and they are very active fish and very enthusiastic eaters. I put those in right after the Raccoon.

Anyhow, I'll change my assessment if I run into any problems down the road, but so far I've got a good opinion of the bannerfish and Raccoon.

racoons and long nose butterflies seem to be easier to keep. ive had a longnose since like 08-09 now, eats everything like a pig. other butterflies can def. be tricky. the copperband being one of them.
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Old 01-28-2012, 05:57 AM   #17
 
Fish can easily go a month without food and despite their slowly starving to death, never seem to appear "unhappy".
If he is the extremely rare mandaarin that is eating prepared foods, good for you. You got very lucky. If not, to bad for the little guy.


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Old 02-02-2012, 12:41 AM   #18
 
Fishers like cat, viper,moor fishes are not good for beginners because they are kind of different from others and beginners better start with Gold, angel and etc.
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Old 02-02-2012, 09:49 AM   #19
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sumi12 View Post
Fish can easily go a month without food and despite their slowly starving to death, never seem to appear "unhappy".
If he is the extremely rare mandaarin that is eating prepared foods, good for you. You got very lucky. If not, to bad for the little guy.


there def. are fish that cannot go a month without food. tangs constantly graze rock for algae naturally so i feel a daily algae sheet ( pref. sliced into strips but not all the way through to wave in the flow more natural ) is a good idea. anthias are another fish that need good food source and this list can continue.

alot of fish could prob. surive a 30 day no food period but i dont suggest putting them to the test. most things in my reefs get fed every other day but usually then alittle heavily. you have to think about the corals having mouths, fish, clean up crew ( even pods/worms ) shrimp all eat. this doesnt mean dump all your food in your tank but create a good feeding routine for what works in your system. i suggest mixing up what you use to feed from time to time ( or even mix 2+ foods together, then offer that ) and pre-rinsing frozen foods in tank/RO/DI water a few times until the run-off appears clear prior to feeding it.
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Old 03-27-2012, 05:05 PM   #20
 
Thumbs up Marine Reef Aquarium

Really a good thread this is, the thread is too much helpful for new beginner. A complete list of fishes which are not suitable in the salt water environment, the reason & other issues also include in the thread.
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