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yellow tang acting weird

This is a discussion on yellow tang acting weird within the Saltwater Fish Diseases forums, part of the Saltwater Fish and Coral Reef Tanks category; --> Originally Posted by bettababy 280 is way too low for calcium. The animals, fish, inverts, corals... all need enough calcium for growth and organ ...

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yellow tang acting weird
Old 10-27-2010, 06:00 PM   #21
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bettababy View Post
280 is way too low for calcium. The animals, fish, inverts, corals... all need enough calcium for growth and organ function. Ideally calcium should read between 400 - 450. Without the proper amount of calcium in the tank, you are going to have many different kinds of issues, such as death, sick fish, dead/dying inverts...

And, as I mentioned in my last post, that is too many fish in that size of a tank. Waste issues are going to be a constant issue, even with daily water changes it will be more than the tank can handle, which is already apparent in your nitrate (no3) reading. Either a bigger tank or fewer fish is the answer to that.

+1 on that. i didn't catch that the ca was that low.
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Old 10-27-2010, 09:37 PM   #22
 
Damn I didn't. Know tap was so bad even to thaw out my mysin shrimp I use regular tap water need to put and end to that and would like one of those filter things to filter tap water work and u really think to much fish in tank right now only 4
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Old 10-27-2010, 10:00 PM   #23
 
And how do I lower carbonate hardness? Very high I just got reef test kit a week ago not not really fimiliar with it but I have master the other one
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Old 10-28-2010, 07:18 AM   #24
 
And I have chemical that raises calcium and says maintains magnesium and is magnesium the same as carbonate hardness?
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Old 10-28-2010, 08:58 AM   #25
 
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This does a much better job explaining the basic chemistry at work in our tanks than I ever could.
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/s...-marine-33079/
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Old 10-28-2010, 05:12 PM   #26
 
Great website but one more small question if I use fitered water do I still use the cholrine remover? I just got prime which removes chlorine chloramine ammonia and detoxifies nitrite and nitrate should I still use fitered water?
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Old 10-30-2010, 07:33 AM   #27
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bettababy View Post
280 is way too low for calcium. The animals, fish, inverts, corals... all need enough calcium for growth and organ function. Ideally calcium should read between 400 - 450. Without the proper amount of calcium in the tank, you are going to have many different kinds of issues, such as death, sick fish, dead/dying inverts...

And, as I mentioned in my last post, that is too many fish in that size of a tank. Waste issues are going to be a constant issue, even with daily water changes it will be more than the tank can handle, which is already apparent in your nitrate (no3) reading. Either a bigger tank or fewer fish is the answer to that.
I was asked for my input on this... sorry to take so long to respond, I just got home from Jamaica.

My initial reaction as I began reading this thread was that low calcium levels, high nitrates, and insufficient aquarium size have resulted in a weakened immunity over a period of time. The scratching behavior is the visual evidence for this. Reading this entire thread, I agree with Dawn word for word on her posts, and would have been posting almost identical responses.

The fact that this Yellow Tang was purchased at a 2'' size and looks the same today as when purchased is a big hint that the environment is to small. This is a fairly fast growing fish and should look much larger with more girth. Tangs growth to 70% of their adult size within the first year of their life, and placing them in a smaller sized aquarium stunts this growth, resulting in internal development issues that inevitably leads to a shortened life. I personally would suggest an aquarium of 6' in length would be wise for any Zebrasoma species of Tang, although I have seen some success in aquariums as small as 75 gallons.

For the record, there are some other things on this thread that I would not initially be as concerned about. I do not necessarily see a problem with using tap water on a fish only or FOWLR aquarium. Tap water in different parts of the world (or country) is treated differently, and an actual analysis of the tap water being used would be needed to have a good discussion on this. For the sake of argument, however, I will suggest that calcium levels under 300ppm could be an indication that something is going on related to the source water, be it the tap water or the salt mix.

I also would want to dig much further into the conversation about live rock absorbing phosphates. I have been at this hobby a very long time and can't recall seeing anything on this portion of the discussion, not in magazines, books, forums, chat rooms, or trade shows. Unfortunately, I have followed the posts of the member (reefsahoy) bringing this topic up, and I have had great respect for his (her?) experience in this hobby and obvious knowledge base. I am confident that there is information in this part of the discussion that will be beneficial.
Reefsahoy.... are you looking towards phosphates as a potential cause for the rapid calcium depletion?
[We are getting off topic with this I think, and perhaps getting into a very advanced discussion. As a moderator I would like to keep this very brief, or invite you to open a new thread where we can discuss this specific issue. There might be something here that a number of us can learn from. If you do open a new thread, please put a link to it on this thread.]

As a final note on this issue, I agree that pictures of the fish and overall aquarium would be extremely valuable. I can usually gather more helpful information from pictures and water parameters than I can from a conversation, especially when trying to help diagnose a disease or other potential problem.
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Old 10-30-2010, 11:50 AM   #28
 
I was also asked for my thoughts on this.

Pasfur, where in Jamaica are you from? I'm also from Jamaica, The country. No i was not bringing up phosphates as a calcium de[letion issue but rather that using tap may have other chemicals, like flouride, chlorimine, etc that may possibly contribute to fish health for example. simply putting chlorine remover will not remove any other chemicals. He also stated that this is a reef with corals so intense lighting is a requirement so if there is a phosphate issue you will get algae and such (see post 18).

Yeah i know that there are no articles about live rock absorbing phosphates but that's from my personal experience. for months i could not figure out where i had phosphates entering my system when i first started this tank and one day i decided to try a test from speaking to many people within reef hobby club locally. I made SW using RO and measured the phosphate levels at 0 then i threw a few rocks from my system into that water and over a few days i had readings of phosphates. there is no explaining how phosphate could have entered the freshly made water other than it came leaching out of the added live rocks so that's how i came up with the theory. Then the thought of old tank symdrome came to mind. IMO, if you look at tanks that have algae issues you can almost be certain that they are using tap water for their water source. I used to have issues but since changing to RO/DI, i have no issues with algae what so ever, even when i do water changes once every couple of months.
Just my .02 cents
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Old 11-01-2010, 06:40 PM   #29
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reefsahoy View Post
Pasfur, where in Jamaica are you from? I'm also from Jamaica, The country.
Misunderstanding. My wife and I just returned home to Kentucky from our vacation in Jamaica! Beautiful county. And I so enjoyed the reefs in the morning. More on that later in another post when I have time to discuss.

Quote:
No i was not bringing up phosphates as a calcium de[letion issue but rather that using tap may have other chemicals, like flouride, chlorimine, etc that may possibly contribute to fish health for example. simply putting chlorine remover will not remove any other chemicals. He also stated that this is a reef with corals so intense lighting is a requirement so if there is a phosphate issue you will get algae and such (see post 18).
I missed that this is a reef. {you see, this is why this site is so great. I knew that I had to be missing something if reefsahoy was giving advice that I couldn't figure out:-} Yes, I agree 100%, for a reef using RO is really a must. Its to difficult to control algae long term otherwise.

Quote:
Yeah i know that there are no articles about live rock absorbing phosphates but that's from my personal experience. for months i could not figure out where i had phosphates entering my system when i first started this tank and one day i decided to try a test from speaking to many people within reef hobby club locally. I made SW using RO and measured the phosphate levels at 0 then i threw a few rocks from my system into that water and over a few days i had readings of phosphates. there is no explaining how phosphate could have entered the freshly made water other than it came leaching out of the added live rocks so that's how i came up with the theory.
Understandable. I would offer that there were organic waste deposits inside the rock which died in transit, or perhaps detritus accumulation that was stirred up in your system with higher water flow. Either could spike phosphates. The same could happen in an older system if the rock was moved around or water flow was drastically changed. Would offer a decent explanation i'd think.

Thanks reefs.
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Old 11-03-2010, 01:29 PM   #30
 
I haven't really move the rocks since I got the coral but i am trying to sent pic to u guys I can get one of tank but can get one of tang sratching he has really doesn't do it any more trying to figure out how to send it
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