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red algee? (maybe)

This is a discussion on red algee? (maybe) within the Saltwater Fish Diseases forums, part of the Saltwater Fish and Coral Reef Tanks category; --> well that is a lot of help who do i listen to?...

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Old 01-31-2007, 06:42 PM   #11
 
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well that is a lot of help who do i listen to?
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Old 01-31-2007, 07:08 PM   #12
 
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Yourself.





Never listen to any of us. Read the advice given and pick what works best for you and your tank. If you can only mix 20g at a time then 20g it is. If doing 10g once a month doe snot fix the problem increase it a bit. If doing a sudden 40g WC your corals or fish look stressed cut back a little. The goal here is to rid your tank of excess nutrients or phosphates.

Again I'll say, increase yor flow to 30 times the water volume of the tank, add a Phosban reactor (they really are dirt cheap and since this is a recurring problem it will only help), water changes.
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Old 01-31-2007, 10:19 PM   #13
 
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Is the Phosban reactor something that stays on the tank or is it used only when needed?
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Old 01-31-2007, 11:11 PM   #14
 
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This is the best phos media but it's pricey. A great write up as well.
http://www.deltecusa.us/aquariummedia/rowaphos.php

This is the cheapest and most respected reactor.

http://www.twolittlefishies.com/tlf_...html?lang_id=1

Good deal and another write up explaining how excess nutrients contribute to algae problems.

http://cgi.ebay.com/PHOSBAN-REACTOR-...QQcmdZViewItem
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Old 02-04-2007, 09:01 PM   #15
 
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well I just ordered a seio 2600 and I hope it comes in soon, but in the mean time I put my rio 2500 in the tank that I was using to help me pump water out and in for my water changes. it is moving a ton more water I hope it takes care of the problem. I have a hair algee problem any recommendations?

Roger
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Old 02-04-2007, 09:04 PM   #16
 
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by the way this is the 90 gal not my 75 reef tank
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Old 02-04-2007, 09:35 PM   #17
 
Folks:

I am asking this for my own edification.

I understand that in the "salt water world" lighting is as important if not more important than filtration.

I do not understand why Roger is experiencing this problem with a wet/dry filtration system.

In my freshwater system the return water to the tank generates significant flow in the tank.

This is just a question but would not a pump with a larger output fix this problem assuming the biological and mechanical filtration is adequate?

TR
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Old 02-05-2007, 05:20 PM   #18
 
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Jones in a 90g tank I'd be pressing for about 3,000-3,500GPH or more for flow. Flow is very important in saltie tanks. A wet/dry for a 90g tank would not work if hooked up to a pump that could push 5,000GPH (giving extra for head losses). Also wet/dry filters can become a source of bane for saltie keepers if it is not regularly maintained. that's why you'll here more and more keepers referring to a sump (a place to add a skimmer out of sight) and a refugium (a place to grow unwanted algaes and such so as to use upt the nutrients). A sump or wet/dry is normally recommended to have a flow between 5-10 times the water volume whereas the tank should have 30-40 times turnover rate.
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Old 02-06-2007, 01:12 PM   #19
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by caferacermike
Jones in a 90g tank I'd be pressing for about 3,000-3,500GPH or more for flow. Flow is very important in saltie tanks. A wet/dry for a 90g tank would not work if hooked up to a pump that could push 5,000GPH (giving extra for head losses). Also wet/dry filters can become a source of bane for saltie keepers if it is not regularly maintained. that's why you'll here more and more keepers referring to a sump (a place to add a skimmer out of sight) and a refugium (a place to grow unwanted algaes and such so as to use upt the nutrients). A sump or wet/dry is normally recommended to have a flow between 5-10 times the water volume whereas the tank should have 30-40 times turnover rate.
I believe that I understand.

In the "saltwater world" the flow required in the tank is so great that if the flow were returned through the sump the filtration would not be effective.

TR
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Old 02-06-2007, 05:22 PM   #20
 
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